Foreclosed homes: Orlando-area forecl...

Foreclosed homes: Orlando-area foreclosed home are rotting away...

There are 354 comments on the Orlando Sentinel story from Jun 19, 2009, titled Foreclosed homes: Orlando-area foreclosed home are rotting away.... In it, Orlando Sentinel reports that:

Manny del Valle, who runs a business cleaning up foreclosed homes, looks at the thousands of dead bees inside a foreclosed home in Kissimmee.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Orlando Sentinel.

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Fat Albert

Sanford, FL

#1 Jun 19, 2009
Peoples true colors come out when they try to blame the bank for the foreclosure. Amazing how people blame banks because they wont lower the payment. A guy at my work gave his 3 year old truck back cause the bank wouldn't lower his payment. The guy had trashed the truck. He used it for constructioon and the whole bed was caved in from going in the exit of a gated community and the gate didn't stop when it hit his truck. The truck was worth 3k and balance on loan 10k. Then the moron buys another truck from a buy here pay here dealer. I purchased a bank owned house last month and luckly no real damage except the walls were filthy and lots of small holes in drywall. I hope the people that trash the houses have ruined credit for many years. Many have no idea what comes with bad credit like inflated car insurance cost and disqualification from many jobs. I believe many mortgage brokers were screwing people, it is up to the buyer to understand what they are signing at closing.
Been There

Satellite Beach, FL

#2 Jun 20, 2009
Uh, moron, the buyer can't understand when they are lied to when the mortgage papers are presented to them.
Never My Fault

Beaumont, TX

#3 Jun 20, 2009
Been There wrote:
Uh, moron, the buyer can't understand when they are lied to when the mortgage papers are presented to them.
Ever hear of caveat emptor? Obviously not. Clearly, you think that mom and pop will be around your whole adult life to keep bad things from happening to you, eh? First rule of contracts: READ THE CONTRACT. If you don't understand it, don't sign it until you do (Simple concept really--for non-Obama voters, anyway)
Disgusted

Palm Bay, FL

#4 Jun 20, 2009
Been There wrote:
Uh, moron, the buyer can't understand when they are lied to when the mortgage papers are presented to them.
Uh duh, can you read? If a person is too stupid to read that they have an adjustable rate mortgage, then maybe they shouldn't be buying a house. It amazes me that people don't read if there's going to be a penalty for paying off the mortgage early clause, balloon payment clause, or adjustable rate clause. Stop being greedy, read before you sign, and do your homework first. Stop blaming other people for your ignorance!

The people destroying their foreclosed homes should be punished to the fullest extent.
Adult

Daytona Beach, FL

#6 Jun 20, 2009
We live in a era of "blame someone else" You are an adult making adult decisions. Read, research, and if it is too good to be true, it probably is.
Reality Check

AOL

#8 Jun 20, 2009
Think about this from the homeowners perspective. The bank will modify mortgages for people who owe 105% or less of the value of the property. If not, and the homeowner can't pay, they will move to foreclose and sell the home at a much lower price than 105% of the value. Why not just let the homeowner stay there in the home and let them refinance with the reduced price the bank was going to sell the home for, anyway?

Both homeowners and banks need to compromise. I lost my job in January, and with little income coming in, I can't afford my $350,000 mortgage. I also owe more than 105% of the value of the home. So I am short-selling the home, and the sale price will be $220,000.

If the bank would just let me refinance for $220,000, I could actually afford to stay in this home.

It's just stupid... Am I the only one who feels this way???
The Recession

San Antonio, TX

#9 Jun 20, 2009
I just can't wait until foreclosures double again next year. Population should begin to grow again in 15 or 20 years, after the next generation of retirees has saved enough to retire to the sunshine state. The baby boomers went broke. They ain't coming. Stick a fork in it.

“miz Kitty”

Since: Jul 08

small town USA

#10 Jun 20, 2009
XXX wrote:
<quoted text>
If you can't afford a real estate attorney to walk you through it, you don't DESERVE a home! You illiterate b*a*s*t*a*r*d...
some friends i know, their bank sold their mortgage to a lender in another state. instead of just being able to go in and pay in person they have to send their pymt to another state, to a bank they've never done business with. they were sent a letter explaining the details months later, they signed NOTHING approving this. it was just done. how are THEY responsible for a late pymt? when details were not disclosed well in advance?
people that are faced with foreclosure need to stay put and make the bank present them with their original loan documents prior to taking a legal action on them.
the way the banks bundled and sold loans not many of them know clearly who owns/owes what.
The Lorax

Kissimmee, FL

#11 Jun 20, 2009
Reality Check wrote:
Think about this from the homeowners perspective. The bank will modify mortgages for people who owe 105% or less of the value of the property. If not, and the homeowner can't pay, they will move to foreclose and sell the home at a much lower price than 105% of the value. Why not just let the homeowner stay there in the home and let them refinance with the reduced price the bank was going to sell the home for, anyway?
Both homeowners and banks need to compromise. I lost my job in January, and with little income coming in, I can't afford my $350,000 mortgage. I also owe more than 105% of the value of the home. So I am short-selling the home, and the sale price will be $220,000.
If the bank would just let me refinance for $220,000, I could actually afford to stay in this home.
It's just stupid... Am I the only one who feels this way???
I would imagine that the banks feel that, if you cannot pay for your existing mortgage, what's the likelihood that you'd remain capable of paying for the reduced amount? Just my speculation. As well, imagine the amount of fraud that would take place if they actually DID institute such a policy.
I used to date a woman who decided that she didn't like where she was living, took out a second mortgage on her condo, used that money to buy an investment property in another country (no paper trail), and THEN bought another condo elsewhere, moved into IT and purposely defaulted on the first one. Sure, now she'll have bad credit (one amongst how many thousands) but she has a brand new condo in a better location, and a place overseas to go on vacation.

And you'd have the banks institute a policy of negotiation???

Personally, if there were a way to prove the purposeful destruction of the home by the homeowner, I'd institute a policy of tracking them down and leaving them in the street with broken knees and ankles.
stupid_bytch

Palm Bay, FL

#12 Jun 20, 2009
But obama will save the country. Yea sure he will. More like run it into the ground.
Pat

Pensacola, FL

#13 Jun 20, 2009
stupid_bytch wrote:
But obama will save the country. Yea sure he will. More like run it into the ground.
Your description of yourself explains it all.
Pat

Pensacola, FL

#14 Jun 20, 2009
Been There wrote:
Uh, moron, the buyer can't understand when they are lied to when the mortgage papers are presented to them.
People need to read and understand the agreements. If they cannot understand it, hire someone (independent) to explain it. I think the agreement paperwork is very much geared to helping the consumer. People need to take responsibilty for their own actions. I don't understand how the hell people can even think of making such a huge purchase without understanding what they are signing.
Get Real

Orlando, FL

#15 Jun 20, 2009
csmith wrote:
<quoted text>
some friends i know, their bank sold their mortgage to a lender in another state. instead of just being able to go in and pay in person they have to send their pymt to another state, to a bank they've never done business with. they were sent a letter explaining the details months later, they signed NOTHING approving this. it was just done. how are THEY responsible for a late pymt? when details were not disclosed well in advance?
people that are faced with foreclosure need to stay put and make the bank present them with their original loan documents prior to taking a legal action on them.
the way the banks bundled and sold loans not many of them know clearly who owns/owes what.
Selling your loan to another lender is common practice and it's not what leads to foreclosure. I've bought or refinance 6 or 7 times and each time the original bank sold the loan. BUT, I didn't get my house forclosed on because of it. AND, if I did I wouldn't have trashed the house and stolen everything out of it. You sign those papers and you are responsible for it. I love how everyone is complaining about how banks lied to them. If a bank actually lied to anyone they would take them to court in a second and win a lawsuit, but you haven't seen that so obviously it's irresponsible people unwilling to take responsibility for their own actions and pure greed.
bank on it

Deltona, FL

#17 Jun 20, 2009
as a hard working american we didn't get no bailout so we lost our home I say git'r'done! by the way stop buying foreclosed homes there not worth what your paying for especially now, besides hey hey! your going to be our 4th wave of recession when no one has job's and can not pay rent for all the foreclosed houses you just bought this is a vicious cycle
Sad

Winter Park, FL

#18 Jun 20, 2009
It's a journalists job to TRACK DOWN the "homeowners" and write a hard news story. It might take an extra day or two but getting to the root of the issue is a journalists job. Please don't write this fluff to help convince others that it's okay to destroy property. People's values suck enough as it is.
King Whiteee

Longwood, FL

#20 Jun 20, 2009
I'm looking for a new pool pump anyone know of a foreclosed property I can get one?
UM Player

United States

#21 Jun 20, 2009
Did we not see this coming???

You just can't make this up.
UM Player

United States

#22 Jun 20, 2009
Change is coming. You can not change greed, and that is what defines the free world. Like it or not, we all want more.
King Whiteee

Longwood, FL

#23 Jun 20, 2009
What is with these stupid links the sentinel is putting in our posts?

I guess they figured out nobody is reading their poorly written articles and people actually come to the message boards for the real story.
Tito

San Antonio, TX

#24 Jun 20, 2009
These folks won't be anymore successful with all of "stripped items" in their possession, it won't help them a bit f they have nowhere to go, very sad.

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