Roads to recovery

There are 18 comments on the Lowell Sun story from Oct 21, 2010, titled Roads to recovery. In it, Lowell Sun reports that:

The idea of a new Interstate 93 exit ramp between exits 41 and 42 along the Andover-Tewksbury-Wilmington corridor has been talked about for more than a decade.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Lowell Sun.

wandering autistic child

East Hampton, CT

#1 Oct 22, 2010
Here is a front page story by Robert Mills titled,'Parents Want School to Act After Autistic Boy Lost Again" that the Sun has yet to permit comment; it concerns a special needs child in a Lowell School who wandered away from the school three or more times. His parents are demanding more aides to watch their child.

While the child is entitled to protection while in school, it needs to be understood that the classroom teacher and aides are overwhelmed with responsibilities.

The parents of this child should pay an extra fee for services similar to that of parents who pay extra fees in school systems that provide after school sports programs, art, and music lessons.
Mary

Billerica, MA

#2 Oct 22, 2010
wandering autistic child wrote:
Here is a front page story by Robert Mills titled,'Parents Want School to Act After Autistic Boy Lost Again" that the Sun has yet to permit comment; it concerns a special needs child in a Lowell School who wandered away from the school three or more times. His parents are demanding more aides to watch their child.
While the child is entitled to protection while in school, it needs to be understood that the classroom teacher and aides are overwhelmed with responsibilities.
The parents of this child should pay an extra fee for services similar to that of parents who pay extra fees in school systems that provide after school sports programs, art, and music lessons.
Actually if you were here yesterday you would have seen that the Sun did allow comments on the story. There were well over 100 comments. But the sun had to shut it down and delete the thread because people cannot be adults and have adult conversations without throwing out derrogatory terms aimed at kids with disabililites. I won't use the the term but it wasn't nice. And it wasn't just a few people either. If this is how grown adults speak of children with disabilities it's no wonder we have so many bullies in our school systems who make fun of other children.
copy editor

East Hampton, CT

#3 Oct 22, 2010
Mary wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually if you were here yesterday you would have seen that the Sun did allow comments on the story. There were well over 100 comments. But the sun had to shut it down and delete the thread because people cannot be adults and have adult conversations without throwing out derrogatory terms aimed at kids with disabililites. I won't use the the term but it wasn't nice. And it wasn't just a few people either. If this is how grown adults speak of children with disabilities it's no wonder we have so many bullies in our school systems who make fun of other children.
The Sun shut down a thread yesterday because of, "derogatory [sp] terms aimed at kids with disabilities [sp]?" Your statement lacks both truth and correct spelling. Get a dictionary.
Mary

Billerica, MA

#4 Oct 22, 2010
copy editor wrote:
<quoted text>
The Sun shut down a thread yesterday because of, "derogatory [sp] terms aimed at kids with disabilities [sp]?" Your statement lacks both truth and correct spelling. Get a dictionary.
Oh another grammar Nazi who has nothing to contribute to a conversation other than pointing out grammatical errors. Thanks Sherlock you found my one typo. I'm sure you've never made a grammatical error before. You must be a copy editor for the Sun. They are known for their outstanding editing skills and accuracy which is top notch above the rest.

So then please share with us why the thread was deleted if not for the ugliness that was being directed towards disabled children?
Mary

Billerica, MA

#5 Oct 22, 2010
Hey copy editor..Check out some of the other threads. There are enough grammatical errors to keep you busy all day in some of them. Have fun!
Franklin M

United States

#6 Oct 22, 2010
The cost of having a one on one staff member to keep an eye on this kid is probably prohibitive. Perhaps the activity of monitoring this student could be part of a mentor program, an intern program, or a student teacher program. Perhaps this activity could be performed by people who are training to work with special needs children or adults.
If there is no funding for a full time monitor, perhaps it could be for class or other training credits. Guidance counselors, teachers, therapists, and even some nursing students may find the experience applicable to their field.
In addition, this child may not require a "buddy system" once he gets used to the routine of his required schedule.
the leslie experience

East Hampton, CT

#7 Oct 23, 2010
Franklin M wrote:
The cost of having a one on one staff member to keep an eye on this kid is probably prohibitive. Perhaps the activity of monitoring this student could be part of a mentor program, an intern program, or a student teacher program. Perhaps this activity could be performed by people who are training to work with special needs children or adults.
If there is no funding for a full time monitor, perhaps it could be for class or other training credits. Guidance counselors, teachers, therapists, and even some nursing students may find the experience applicable to their field.
In addition, this child may not require a "buddy system" once he gets used to the routine of his required schedule.
Yes, they have that program at Middlesex Community College but that volunteer community service program doesn't run the entire year nor do student teachers spend an entire day at the schools. Those "volunteer" student teachers are also inexperienced and the autistic child has many needs. It's a little premature to expect this child to not require a buddy system after spending a short time with one.

It's interesting that the writer doesn't seem to recognize any need for the parents of this child to pay a fee for greater supervision. A small fee of several hundred dollars a year demonstrates an appreciation for the costs of the labor intensive supervision necessary for their autistic child. In addition IEP students are entitled by law to a particular level of care by professionals rather than amateurs.
Franklin M

United States

#8 Oct 23, 2010
the leslie experience wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, they have that program at Middlesex Community College but that volunteer community service program doesn't run the entire year nor do student teachers spend an entire day at the schools. Those "volunteer" student teachers are also inexperienced and the autistic child has many needs. It's a little premature to expect this child to not require a buddy system after spending a short time with one.
It's interesting that the writer doesn't seem to recognize any need for the parents of this child to pay a fee for greater supervision. A small fee of several hundred dollars a year demonstrates an appreciation for the costs of the labor intensive supervision necessary for their autistic child. In addition IEP students are entitled by law to a particular level of care by professionals rather than amateurs.
I did not state that the child should be assisted by a volunteer instead of trained staff.
However, it would not take a PHD to make sure he didn't wander off. An additional staff member, who's purpose was to monitor the students location would solve the problem of his wandering off and provide the volunteer with some experience.
Please don't volunteer any more of your incorrect interpretations of my comments.
Thanks.
the leslie experience

East Hampton, CT

#9 Oct 24, 2010
Franklin M wrote:
The cost of having a one on one staff member to keep an eye on this kid is probably prohibitive. Perhaps the activity of monitoring this student could be part of a mentor program, an intern program, or a student teacher program. Perhaps this activity could be performed by people who are training to work with special needs children or adults.
If there is no funding for a full time monitor, perhaps it could be for class or other training credits. Guidance counselors, teachers, therapists, and even some nursing students may find the experience applicable to their field.
In addition, this child may not require a "buddy system" once he gets used to the routine of his required schedule.
Please review your earlier statement above. Your idea is that adequate services be provided by, "people who are training...a student teacher program, or a student teacher program," addresses a low cost and to a certain extent "free" supervision. This is not a distortion of your ideas for they are your words. In your bottom line you suggest the "buddy system" will be of short duration. Thus, your criteria doesn't meet the needs of the autistic child whose entitlements are law. Thank you.
Franklin M

United States

#13 Oct 24, 2010
the leslie experience wrote:
<quoted text>
Please review your earlier statement above. Your idea is that adequate services be provided by, "people who are training...a student teacher program, or a student teacher program," addresses a low cost and to a certain extent "free" supervision. This is not a distortion of your ideas for they are your words. In your bottom line you suggest the "buddy system" will be of short duration. Thus, your criteria doesn't meet the needs of the autistic child whose entitlements are law. Thank you.
Wrong again. I never said that any current staff should be elininated, only that a volunteer be used to keep track of the students location. There is absolutely nothing in my statement that suggests that any current professional should be eliminated or replaced.
There is nothing in my post that suggests that the number of staff should be reduced.
You made that assumption, and it is incorrect. If you don't have the integrity to acknowledge your mistake, perhaps you could simply go away.
Eddie

Lowell, MA

#14 Oct 24, 2010
Not one of the comments thus far is related to the material in the article. Get a life people.
the leslie experience

East Hampton, CT

#15 Oct 24, 2010
Franklin M wrote:
<quoted text>
Wrong again. I never said that any current staff should be elininated, only that a volunteer be used to keep track of the students location. There is absolutely nothing in my statement that suggests that any current professional should be eliminated or replaced.
There is nothing in my post that suggests that the number of staff should be reduced.
You made that assumption, and it is incorrect. If you don't have the integrity to acknowledge your mistake, perhaps you could simply go away.
When employing a "volunteer" that person must meet state standards and have the appropriate teaching credentials to qualify for taking care of an autistic student.
Please note that the system has red-lined the word, "elininated" in your last reply because the word is spelled incorrectly.
Steven Grimes

Windham, NH

#16 Oct 24, 2010
the leslie experience wrote:
<quoted text>
When employing a "volunteer" that person must meet state standards and have the appropriate teaching credentials to qualify for taking care of an autistic student.
Please note that the system has red-lined the word, "elininated" in your last reply because the word is spelled incorrectly.
No one ever said that the volunteers wouldn't have to meet certain standards, just like no one ever said that there would be staff eliminated.
And pointing out a typographical error?
A typographical error has no bearing on the actual response or the content of the comment. Your two gross misinterpretations of the comments made are the important errors here, and the fact that someone typed an "N" instead of an "M" isn't something you take the time to point unless you have no real argument to make.
Franklin's suggestion that a voluntarily staff member be assigned to monitor certain students for class credits instead of cash was a well thought out and valid strategy.
Your misinterpretation of how many staff would be present and the complete fantasy that they would somehow attain less than appropriate people for the job did nothing to help with the issue or the conversation.
People like you are why it is so difficult to get anything good accomplished.
Steven Grimes

Windham, NH

#17 Oct 24, 2010
Eddie wrote:
Not one of the comments thus far is related to the material in the article. Get a life people.
A hall monitor is not required. A valid conversation was initiated. The fact that the original header is unrelated has no bearing on the current exchange.
for steve and frankie

East Hampton, CT

#18 Oct 24, 2010
The article written by Robert Mills titled, "Parents want to school to act after autistic boy lost again." It's in the archives, so read it.

Steven Grimes and Franklin H take the position that labor intensive childcare-which autism involves-are provided by the schools for free. The fact is that volunteers are often unavailable or unreliable.

Since the writers insist that volunteers would solve the problem it is suggested that they contact the Lowell School Department and offer their services for FREE!
TOMMYBOY

San Antonio, TX

#19 Oct 25, 2010
Even a high school kid or anybody with a few hours a day to volunteer could be put in a classroom and keep a head count of 5-10-20 children,to keep one from wandering off.You don't need a degree to count to 20.
Steven Grimes

Windham, NH

#20 Oct 25, 2010
for steve and frankie wrote:
The article written by Robert Mills titled, "Parents want to school to act after autistic boy lost again." It's in the archives, so read it.
Steven Grimes and Franklin H take the position that labor intensive childcare-which autism involves-are provided by the schools for free. The fact is that volunteers are often unavailable or unreliable.
Since the writers insist that volunteers would solve the problem it is suggested that they contact the Lowell School Department and offer their services for FREE!
You people are like children.
If they initiated a program where people who were training for jobs in these fields could participate and earn credits there would be some good people available to assist. This would benefit the students and the trainees.
What's your next argument going to be, that additional staff would create parking issues at the schools?
Are there anymore non arguments?
And yes, if I was back in training to work with special needs children, I would jump on the chance to work for extra credit.
This conversation makes me feel like I'm at work, except the kids pick up on stuff faster than you people do.
Steven Grimes

Windham, NH

#21 Oct 25, 2010
"Steven Grimes and Franklin H take the position that labor intensive childcare-which autism involves-are provided by the schools for free."

We do? Where does it say, in either of our posts, that we think these services are free?
Your ENTIRE argument has been fabricated on things we did not say.
I have worked with special needs children, both mental and emotional based, and I am well aware of the costs related to the service.

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