Indy landfill could grow by 96 acres

Indy landfill could grow by 96 acres

There are 20 comments on the The Indianapolis Star story from Dec 9, 2007, titled Indy landfill could grow by 96 acres. In it, The Indianapolis Star reports that:

One of Indiana's largest landfills could grow by more than a third under a plan being reviewed by state environmental officials.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Indianapolis Star.

Al Gore

Frankfort, IN

#2 Dec 10, 2007
An inconvenient result - 2/3 of the increase in US population since 1990 are immigrants (legal and illegal). The American citizens did their part toward a sustainable population and birthrate, but politicians destroyed that with inaction and misplaced pity. Any environmental action you take is immediately negated by the 10000 illegals flooding the country every day. So, pat yourself on the back for driving a Prius while the 10000 new illegals are driving 1978 smooke-belching Buick Electra's!
Elmer

United States

#3 Dec 10, 2007
If Recycling were automatically included in our taxes, and Trash were a costly option, perhaps the landfill would have another 12 years capacity without an expansion.

Our current system is backwards.
Observer

Indianapolis, IN

#4 Dec 10, 2007
You have to look hard to find a recycling location that takes plastics, bottles and cans. Newspaper recycling containers are everywhere, but the containers for plastics, bottles and cans have disappeared. Why is that? Couldn't we save waste-space and improve the environment if recycling containers for all types of recycling were located within neighborhoods and easily accessible? These days every family should have a dedicated recycling bin in their house and make weekly trips to recycling bins. Why isn't Indpls. trying to get ahead of the curve on this?,
John

Duncan, OK

#5 Dec 10, 2007
rather have it on the Southside then the Northside.
Danny White

AOL

#6 Dec 10, 2007
This is a terrible idea. Place it on the North Side. The wind blows from the Southwest. If it was on the northeast side no one would be subjected to the smell of this. Next, why not use the underground mine (aggregate) that is next door to it and fill it in with trash. NO MORE EXPANSION on the South Side. Take the Cities trash to Carmel. That would make better sense than to expand the existing one. The current one does not meet it's committments and conditions. Piles of trash and earth are much much higher than originally agreed upon. The piles of trash are a couple hundred feet in the air. That was not the orignial agreement and why is no one doing anything about it. To conclude, the South Side land fill scatters trash and mud all over Kentucky Ave. to the point I will not use that section of KY. Ave HWY #67.
Elmer

United States

#7 Dec 10, 2007
And speaking of taking the City's trash to Carmel, I would like to propose that the Wheeler Mission and all soup kitchens be moved to Carmel. Then they can deal with spending tax dollars on those headaches.
Danny White wrote:
This is a terrible idea. Place it on the North Side. The wind blows from the Southwest. If it was on the northeast side no one would be subjected to the smell of this. Next, why not use the underground mine (aggregate) that is next door to it and fill it in with trash. NO MORE EXPANSION on the South Side. Take the Cities trash to Carmel. That would make better sense than to expand the existing one. The current one does not meet it's committments and conditions. Piles of trash and earth are much much higher than originally agreed upon. The piles of trash are a couple hundred feet in the air. That was not the orignial agreement and why is no one doing anything about it. To conclude, the South Side land fill scatters trash and mud all over Kentucky Ave. to the point I will not use that section of KY. Ave HWY #67.
nimby

Fishers, IN

#8 Dec 10, 2007
Danny White wrote:
This is a terrible idea. Place it on the North Side. The wind blows from the Southwest. If it was on the northeast side no one would be subjected to the smell of this. Next, why not use the underground mine (aggregate) that is next door to it and fill it in with trash. NO MORE EXPANSION on the South Side. Take the Cities trash to Carmel. That would make better sense than to expand the existing one. The current one does not meet it's committments and conditions. Piles of trash and earth are much much higher than originally agreed upon. The piles of trash are a couple hundred feet in the air. That was not the orignial agreement and why is no one doing anything about it. To conclude, the South Side land fill scatters trash and mud all over Kentucky Ave. to the point I will not use that section of KY. Ave HWY #67.
You can't put trash in an open mine it would contaminate local groundwater (drinking water) besides southside garbage does not meet Carmel's standards for quality. However Carmel trash is certainly good enough for southsiders to serve at schools and resturants.
Happy

Indianapolis, IN

#9 Dec 10, 2007
If Marion County mandated recycling, we would not have to worry about having a 96 acre expansion lasting only 12 years. What then? We will have to expand yet again, dedicating land for trash. What the heck kind of sense is that? Instead, we could be maximizing our profit and minimizing our imprint by:

Mandate recycling – promote education in recycling benefits. Educate the public about what materials are really recyclable and which are not. Provide recycling bins for citizens. Place hefty fines on those who do not follow the recycling rules.

Create industries that reuse recyclable materials - Indianapolis can reuse recycled materials for building inside Indianapolis and provide the building materials to contractors at a fraction of the price for materials brought in from outside of Indianapolis. The materials can also be sold to surrounding counties at a fraction of the price, creating business revenue and in effect, support itself.

The majority of all material in landfills is plastic. Plastic can be turned into fabric for clothing and carpets, engineered wood/ poly composites, more bottles for bottling plants inside Indianapolis and around Indiana, storage containers for the city/ state, orange barrels for DOT.

The end product of the sanitary system is a big brick that is not very different from masonry and structural bricks. The bricks are not poop, they are not smelly, and they do not contain corn. They are the inorganic material that is left after all organic material and trash has been filtered and decomposed from the system. Indianapolis can take this material to be used in city buildings, masonry roads, and as a supplement to concrete and cinder block creation. Indianapolis had the opportinuity not to long ago to have a much cheaper stadium be built with this material, but the public rejected it due to poor public education on the part of the city and more than likely at the request of building material suppliers and contractors. If Indy created an industry for brick production, we could sell the product to surrounding counties.

Paper is another contributor to landfills filling up quickly. Indianapolis is riddled with engineering and architecture companies who use a ridiculously enormous amount of paper on a weekly basis. Many of these companies do have a recycling program in place and so they generate an equally enormous amount of waste. This paper waste, which is more than likely clean and light bond, can be turned into an unlimited amount of products such as – mulch/ planter bedding, more paper, cardboard boxes, restaurant carry-out containers, etc…

All recycled products sold to restaurants for carry-out containers will off-set the amount of Styrofoam used by the restaurant industry. Card-board packaging made from recycled materials can be sold off to distribution warehouses and local businesses at a fraction of the cost of the products they normally buy and tax incentives can also help promote to use and further recycling of reusable materials.

Indiana being the corn farming stat that it is has always had an enormous opportunity to use corn by-products for everyday use as well. Corn husks can be used in making boxes and thicker papers for industrial use. It can also be used as batting for insulation. Mostly the husks are tossed into landfills.

To sum it up, we have so many resources at out disposal that can be used to create a self-sustainable city that provides not only our own material, but material for the entire state, yet we throw it all away and think nothing of. Instead we create solutions that will only lead to the exact same problem we face now.
Thank you for reading this, even though I know it is really long.

“We're all Bozos on this bus”

Since: Jan 07

South Bend, IN

#10 Dec 10, 2007
Since the landfill has been growing vertically for decades, why do they now need to grow it horizontally?
Wow

Carmel, IN

#11 Dec 10, 2007
Burn it. Burn it all I say.
interesting

United States

#12 Dec 10, 2007
The most interesting fact that was mentioned in this article, is that four people attended a meeting to hear about what the options were.
Anonymous

Hartford, CT

#13 Dec 10, 2007
Indianapolis does currently burn a lot of it's trash, we need to just burn it all.
Atila

Carmel, IN

#14 Dec 10, 2007
we have land (resource), so we are not forced to think outside of the box (invent). Countries that don't have land (Japan) recycle 85% of their trash.

It happens all the time. Netherlands doesn't have land or sunshine...but it's the biggest exporter of flowers (greenhouse innovation)...there are other historic factors there too, but I believe when you don't have resources, it leads to innovation.

"Unfortunately" we have plenty of land so we can expand landfills, we create suburban sprawl, etc.
Happy

Indianapolis, IN

#15 Dec 10, 2007
Anonymous wrote:
Indianapolis does currently burn a lot of it's trash, we need to just burn it all.
Trash incinerators are not very clean and they do not provide enough energy to justify the amount of pollution they put out which are mostly heavy metals like mercury and cadmium. Trash incinerators also only burn the "cleanest" of the trash. All the stuff that is soggy with chemicals and toxic materials go to the landfill. They are mostly a bad solution to an even worse problem.
Local landlord

United States

#16 Dec 10, 2007
The problem I have with this landfill is the fee. People illegally dump all over this city because they don't want to pay $25-$75 to run a pickup to the dump. If you go you'll see huge trucks all day long in and out, being weighed; really big industrial and business waste. But the homeowner with a small truck just trying to clean up his alley or run an old bed from an apartment gets socked with these big charges. I pay my taxes. Why can't I run a few things to the dump on the cheap? They'll tell you they have a $5 Saturday for homeowners but when I tried it it was hard to find and had a line an hour long. I'll bet Monroe Gray's concrete trucks don't pay anything. I had 4 or 5 items the other day and they charged me $26. No wonder everybody just tosses their junk in an alley.

“We're all Bozos on this bus”

Since: Jan 07

South Bend, IN

#17 Dec 10, 2007
interesting wrote:
The most interesting fact that was mentioned in this article, is that four people attended a meeting to hear about what the options were.
The only notice was probably that teensy line buried in the back of the Star's classifieds. It's surprising even 4 people saw it.

I, for one, didn't even know about any such meeting.
Anonymous

Hartford, CT

#18 Dec 10, 2007
Happy wrote:
<quoted text>
Trash incinerators are not very clean and they do not provide enough energy to justify the amount of pollution they put out which are mostly heavy metals like mercury and cadmium. Trash incinerators also only burn the "cleanest" of the trash. All the stuff that is soggy with chemicals and toxic materials go to the landfill. They are mostly a bad solution to an even worse problem.
This is incorrect, the scrubbers on top of the smoke stacks filter about 99.9% of all emmisions. Alot of the power used to generate steam for downtown indianapolis and chilled water for the large buildings comes from incinerating trash. And don't even start on the global warming BS, its just a pile of BS :)
Kevin

Woodburn, IN

#19 Dec 10, 2007
HERE IS A THOUGHT....RECYCLE

What a great concept.
bob searcy

United States

#20 Dec 10, 2007
im beggin ya.solidify the sh#t,and build up morgan countys hill ranges with it.wed have a mountain tourist town here in 20 yrs.foresight people foresight.people thought king ludwig was mad too spending money on fantasie castles.but,his castles today and tomorrow bring the state of bavaria countless millions
bob searcy

United States

#21 Dec 10, 2007
Anonymous wrote:
<quoted text>
This is incorrect, the scrubbers on top of the smoke stacks filter about 99.9% of all emmisions. Alot of the power used to generate steam for downtown indianapolis and chilled water for the large buildings comes from incinerating trash. And don't even start on the global warming BS, its just a pile of BS :)
global warming might be bs but in five yrs a 900 sq ft house will be common in us.

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