Hurricane Rita Experiences

Hurricane Rita Experiences

There are 23 comments on the Fema.gov story from Sep 18, 2006, titled Hurricane Rita Experiences. In it, Fema.gov reports that:

The stories told by Hurricane Rita's displaced residents in Southwest Louisiana are as different and fascinating as the people doing the telling.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Fema.gov.

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MY 2 CENTS

Sulphur, LA

#1 Sep 19, 2006
I went through this Hurricane, wow, I have been through several being from the Texas Gulf coast, but this one was big and bad! The winds and the rain was bad enough1, but it was the aftermath that really surpriced me! Yes it took awhile for help to arrive, and yes there were some that got upset and mad at each other, mostly over gas and false information getting out where to go for help. But the majority of us pulled togther and helped each other out. The difference from Rita Aand Katrina was Rita hit in a majority small area thats was populated mostly by whites and Katrina hit in a major city(though it was water not winds that hit that area)The New Orleans the self proclaimed "chocolate city" instead of its citizens organizing themselves to help there fellow man out they went insane case and point the superdome and all the looting and the shooting at rescuer`s.
dwr in Sulphur La

Wichita, KS

#2 Sep 19, 2006
MY 2 CENTS wrote:
I went through this Hurricane, wow, I have been through several being from the Texas Gulf coast, but this one was big and bad! The winds and the rain was bad enough1, but it was the aftermath that really surpriced me! Yes it took awhile for help to arrive, and yes there were some that got upset and mad at each other, mostly over gas and false information getting out where to go for help. But the majority of us pulled togther and helped each other out. The difference from Rita Aand Katrina was Rita hit in a majority small area thats was populated mostly by whites and Katrina hit in a major city(though it was water not winds that hit that area)The New Orleans the self proclaimed "chocolate city" instead of its citizens organizing themselves to help there fellow man out they went insane case and point the superdome and all the looting and the shooting at rescuer`s.
Sad wasn't it.Hard to argue with those folks too. I tried, they always have a reason why they cant or couldn't. Dependancy on government will kill you, if there isnt one thing that Katrina should have taught people, it is that one thing.
Tara

Chattahoochee, FL

#3 Sep 20, 2006
dwr in Sulphur La wrote:
<quoted text>
Sad wasn't it.Hard to argue with those folks too. I tried, they always have a reason why they cant or couldn't. Dependancy on government will kill you, if there isnt one thing that Katrina should have taught people, it is that one thing.
Amen!! My nephew was in New Orleans, at Tulane University Hospital, during the days after the flooding. His son, my great-nephew, just 18 months old had some fluid on his brain and they were there for testing, treatment, etc. That hospital was under attack just like the reports said, it was stormed by men wanting to get narcotics. Junkies. My nephew was one of the few there who repeatedly made cell calls for help while barracading himself in a room, top floor, waiting for air evac. They DID shoot at the chopper. Finally, he was able to see his baby aboard one helicopter, he was turned away. That boy made his way out of the hosp, waded through water, walked that overpass, waded and swam through some more and walked his way right OUT of NO. A news truck picked him up and gave him a ride back to Baton Rouge where my brother, his daddy, finally got him. I feel for the old and the young who couldn't walk out. But what about the others? They could've done the same, in my opinion. I'm proud of my nephew, I'd done the same. Piggy-backed my girl all the way out of that god-forsaken place. The rest, waiting on the gov't. Lordy, Lordy. "God helps those, who help themselves"
Tara

Bristol, FL

#4 Sep 20, 2006
MY 2 CENTS wrote:
I went through this Hurricane, wow, I have been through several being from the Texas Gulf coast, but this one was big and bad! The winds and the rain was bad enough1, but it was the aftermath that really surpriced me! Yes it took awhile for help to arrive, and yes there were some that got upset and mad at each other, mostly over gas and false information getting out where to go for help. But the majority of us pulled togther and helped each other out. The difference from Rita Aand Katrina was Rita hit in a majority small area thats was populated mostly by whites and Katrina hit in a major city(though it was water not winds that hit that area)The New Orleans the self proclaimed "chocolate city" instead of its citizens organizing themselves to help there fellow man out they went insane case and point the superdome and all the looting and the shooting at rescuer`s.
I've been through em all my life being from the coast too, and Rita was terrible. You're right, if it had been a densely populated area with more minorities it would have grabbed the headlines, too. Well, it didn't grab any headlines, but it got a hold of me. That was my home completely destroyed. I grew up in Grand Chenier, I've lived all over LA it seems, but that's were I spent the majority of my childhood, graduated school. It breaks my heart, everytime I go. My heart hurt for everyone, friend or foe, I know back home. Knowing we all lost the same thing, Home. My brother, in Carlyss, had damages, his father-in-law's home was picked up and set back down, they're still demolishing it by hand, no help from FEMA. My brother took him in. We take care of our own.
Tara

Bristol, FL

#5 Sep 20, 2006
Hey, y'all, just caught Sammy Kershaw on CMT and he said he just had to comment on the hurricanes, katrina in the east and rita in the west. He said and I quote "Cajuns over in the west went in after the water receded and got to work immediately on rebuilding and salvaging what they could. They didn't sit around and wait on FEMA, they just got to work. There's time for fighting with the gov't and ins. agencies later, first things first." He went on to say "I'm proud of that, just goes to show you can't break the Cajun's spirit." There was more. LOVED IT!!! Damn straight, tell em like it is, Sammy!!!
RANDY HOOD

United States

#7 Oct 14, 2006
MY EXPERIENCE WITH RITA----HELP
I RODE THE STORM OUT IN MY HOME IN MOSS BLUFF, JUST NORTH OF LAKE CHARLES. AFTERWARDS, I MET A LOT OF WONDERFUL PEOPLE, WHO LEFT THEIR HOMES AND FAMILIES TO COME DOWN AND HELP. MY BIGGEST SURPRISE HAS BEEN MY MORTGAGE COMPANY(SAXON MORTGAGE SERVICES). MY INSURANCE IS WITH STATE FARM, A YEAR HAS GONE BY AND I AM STILL FIGHTING WITH MY MORTGAGE COMPANY TO SEND ME MY INSURANCE CHECK WITH THEIR ENDORSEMENT. IN THE FIRST SIX MONTHS THEY LOST THE CHECK, GOT STATE FARM TO RE-ISSUE IT, SINCE IT WAS ADDRESSED TO A DIFFERENT ADDRESS THAN THE INSURED ADDRESS THEY REFUSED TO ENDORSE IT, SO THEY SENT IT BACK UN-ENDORSED. GOD FORBID THAT SOMEONE WOULD BE DIS-PLACED AFTER A HURRICANE. AFTER DISCUSSIONS WITH STATE FARM(WHO BY THE WAY THINK THE MORTGAGE COMPANY IS NUTS), THEY SENT A LETTER STATING THAT THE CHECK WAS FOR REPAIRS AT THE MORTGAGE ADDRESS, THEN SAXON WANTS AN INSPECTOR TO LOOK AT THE HOUSE AND BE SURE ALL REPAIRS HAVE BEEN MADE. FORTUNATELY, I COULD COVER THE REPAIRS MYSELF, BUT THINGS ARE STARTING TO GET TIGHT(REPAIRS APPROX.$10,000) SAXON SAYS THATS MY PROBLEM. IF ANYBODY KNOWS OF A GOVERNMENT AGENCY OR AN ATTORNEY THATS HANDLING PROBLEMS LIKE THIS, PLEASE, E-MAIL ME AT [email protected]
dwr in Sulphur La

Wichita, KS

#8 Oct 15, 2006
RANDY HOOD wrote:
MY EXPERIENCE WITH RITA----HELP
I RODE THE STORM OUT IN MY HOME IN MOSS BLUFF, JUST NORTH OF LAKE CHARLES. AFTERWARDS, I MET A LOT OF WONDERFUL PEOPLE, WHO LEFT THEIR HOMES AND FAMILIES TO COME DOWN AND HELP. MY BIGGEST SURPRISE HAS BEEN MY MORTGAGE COMPANY(SAXON MORTGAGE SERVICES). MY INSURANCE IS WITH STATE FARM, A YEAR HAS GONE BY AND I AM STILL FIGHTING WITH MY MORTGAGE COMPANY TO SEND ME MY INSURANCE CHECK WITH THEIR ENDORSEMENT. IN THE FIRST SIX MONTHS THEY LOST THE CHECK, GOT STATE FARM TO RE-ISSUE IT, SINCE IT WAS ADDRESSED TO A DIFFERENT ADDRESS THAN THE INSURED ADDRESS THEY REFUSED TO ENDORSE IT, SO THEY SENT IT BACK UN-ENDORSED. GOD FORBID THAT SOMEONE WOULD BE DIS-PLACED AFTER A HURRICANE. AFTER DISCUSSIONS WITH STATE FARM(WHO BY THE WAY THINK THE MORTGAGE COMPANY IS NUTS), THEY SENT A LETTER STATING THAT THE CHECK WAS FOR REPAIRS AT THE MORTGAGE ADDRESS, THEN SAXON WANTS AN INSPECTOR TO LOOK AT THE HOUSE AND BE SURE ALL REPAIRS HAVE BEEN MADE. FORTUNATELY, I COULD COVER THE REPAIRS MYSELF, BUT THINGS ARE STARTING TO GET TIGHT(REPAIRS APPROX.$10,000) SAXON SAYS THATS MY PROBLEM. IF ANYBODY KNOWS OF A GOVERNMENT AGENCY OR AN ATTORNEY THATS HANDLING PROBLEMS LIKE THIS, PLEASE, E-MAIL ME AT [email protected]
I know someone who has had a simular experience, The mortgage company in his case took the money and instead of repair the House, They applied it to the loan so They have a house that is damaged but no longer have a mortgage. They are getting the repairs done, though. But the whole thing was a mess.
Tara

Bristol, FL

#9 Oct 25, 2006
I sent this poem out to family and friends back home, or at least nearby,:0( after the storm; just wanted to share. Enjoy!

I noticed as I drove thru back home how the Oaks are greening once more. Amazing with all the damage and destruction around. And at the same time inspiring! This is for all the beautiful Oaks in Cameron Parish that stood Alone after Hurricane Rita!! May they not stand alone for too long! A reminder of the quiet beauty of this truly unique strip of land we call Home.



I Saw in Louisiana a Live-Oak Growing

I saw in Louisiana a live-oak growing.
All alone stood it and the moss hung down from the branches,
Without any companion it grew there uttering joyous leaves of dark green,
And its look, rude, unbending, lusty, made me think of myself,
But I wondered how it could utter joyous leaves standing alone there without
its friend near, for I knew I could not,
And I broke off a twig with a certain number of leaves upon it, and twined around it a little moss,
And brought it away, and I have placed it in sight, in my room,
It is not needed to remind me as of my own dear friends,
(For I believe lately I think of little else than of them,)
Yet it remains to me a curious token, it makes me think of manly love;
For all that, and though the live-oak glistens there in Louisiana solitary in
a wide flat space,
Uttering joyous leaves all lits life without a friend a lover near,
I know very well I could not.

--by Walt Whitman




GOD,
I Believe In HIM,
HE Believes In ME,
And I Believe In YOU!!
LOVE YA!! TARA
Tara R

Bristol, FL

#10 Oct 30, 2006
Red Beans and Rice

Every Monday morning Mother
would wash our dirty clothes
in a galvanized tub on the back porch.
She would curse "blue Mondays"
while her knuckles grew raw
from soaping and rubbing out the dirt
on her corrugated scrub board.
Then she'd hang the clothes out to dry,
and in the afternoon gather them in
to iron and fold and stow away.

But that wasn't all Mother did:
on Mondays she cooked red beans and rice.
All day long the beans would bubble
and simmer on our old iron stove,
taking flavor from the fat back,
onions, garlic, tomatoes, Tabasco,
and cajun spices she stirred into the pot.
My job was to stoke the fire,
on pain of a whipping should it die.
But I'd find all kinds of reasons
just to hang around the kitchen,
smelling those red beans cooking,
getting more tender by the minute,
soaking up the mysterious flavors.
When her "wash day" was over,
and Daddy had come home from work,
Mother would cook a big bowl of rice,
and we'd sit down to our supper
of red beans over the rice,
topped with chopped onion and olive oil.
It was a meal outsiders
called slave food and lean fare
fit to be served only in the poorhouse,
but to this New Orleans kid
red beans and rice was a feast
good enough for royalty.
Even after Mother got a washing machine
and gave the scrub board to me--
as a toy to make music on--
she still cooked red beans and rice
every Monday. It was a culinary habit
bayou women kept all their lives.

Much later in life I read a quote
by Nelson Algren that goes like this:
"Never eat at a place called Mom's,
never play cards with a man named Doc,
and never go to bed with a woman
whose troubles are greater than your own,"
all rules I've broken several times over,
and regretted--as a man.
Still, I wish he'd never said "never"
about eating at a place called Mom's.
A kid growing up has to eat at Mom's,
because that's where he lives.
I don't know when Algren's maxims
kicked in completely for me,
but the good Lord knows how much I'd give
to go back and eat at my Mom's one more time,
especially if it were on Monday,
when she'd be serving up red beans and rice.
Tara R

Bristol, FL

#11 Oct 30, 2006
Robert Frost
Poetry

The Tuft of Flowers

I went to turn the grass once after one
Who mowed it in the dew before the sun.

The dew was gone that made his blade so keen
Before I came to view the levelled scene.

I looked for him behind an isle of trees;
I listened for his whetstone on the breeze.

But he had gone his way, the grass all mown,
And I must be, as he had been,--alone,

`As all must be,' I said within my heart,
`Whether they work together or apart.'

But as I said it, swift there passed me by
On noiseless wing a 'wildered butterfly,

Seeking with memories grown dim o'er night
Some resting flower of yesterday's delight.

And once I marked his flight go round and round,
As where some flower lay withering on the ground.

And then he flew as far as eye could see,
And then on tremulous wing came back to me.

I thought of questions that have no reply,
And would have turned to toss the grass to dry;

But he turned first, and led my eye to look
At a tall tuft of flowers beside a brook,

A leaping tongue of bloom the scythe had spared
Beside a reedy brook the scythe had bared.

I left my place to know them by their name,
Finding them butterfly weed when I came.

The mower in the dew had loved them thus,
By leaving them to flourish, not for us,

Nor yet to draw one thought of ours to him.
But from sheer morning gladness at the brim.

The butterfly and I had lit upon,
Nevertheless, a message from the dawn,

That made me hear the wakening birds around,
And hear his long scythe whispering to the ground,

And feel a spirit kindred to my own;
So that henceforth I worked no more alone;

But glad with him, I worked as with his aid,
And weary, sought at noon with him the shade;

And dreaming, as it were, held brotherly speech
With one whose thought I had not hoped to reach.

`Men work together,' I told him from the heart,
`Whether they work together or apart.'
Tara R

Bristol, FL

#13 Oct 30, 2006
Cajun Boy wrote:
<quoted text>I struggled to read this aloud to my spouse as my soul remembered every emotion of my own experiences. You post brought tears to my eyes and pain to my heart from missing my mother who died a couple of years ago. I miss her terribly.
Thanks for the wonderful memories.
Do you write professionally?
I write but never this well. Oh, how I wish I wrote it... I found it, looking for something of home this morning. I miss Home. It brought tears to my eyes as well, but, it made my heart laugh.... I've taken up the tradition of Red Beans and Rice,*slave*:0)*poor folk* food.

I know your sorrow, I know your grief, and I'm glad we could all remember together....

God's Speed, Sha!!
Tara R

Bristol, FL

#14 Oct 30, 2006
http://home.hawaii.rr.com/jeverly/ralph/poetr...

Cajun Boy, here is where I found it. There is more to enjoy. It just speaks to me!! My daddy, mawmaw and pawpaw are from Eunice. My daddy is J.C. Fruge. He is passed on, gone home now. Back home to Eunice, matter of fact!!:0) God Bless Y'all!!
Tara R

Blountstown, FL

#16 Oct 31, 2006
Cajun Boy wrote:
<quoted text>Hi Tara,
Thanks for the link. I saw your posts on several other forums - don't remember which ones.
I moved to Houston right after floudering around in South Louisiana for a while trying to decide what to do. Graduated from the Univ of Houston with a degree in psychology and built a rather successful practice which I thoroughly enjoyed for 30 years. My 7 siblings remained in the South LA area all within 15 miles of Eunice.
When my mother was diagnosed with Alzheimers disease, my siblings spouses immediately "voted" to put her in the nursing home. I was shocked that my siblings would even consider that option since my mother was so loving and sweet. I would not allow it and moved in with my mother to care for her. Her condition became worse and after 2 years my savings were all but gone. Her medication was so very expensive I could no longer afford it and got absolutely NO help from any my siblings. One came to visit once a week and wondered if I got bored with "nothing" to do all day.
After two years of living with her, my savings gone and a relationship in Houston which I had seriously neglected, I asked for one of my brothers to take over for a weekend. That was my saddest mistake. When I returned, my brothers had my mother in a nursing home, her apartment had been vacated (after all the years of sharecropping, my parents never owned their own home). I finally broke down from all the stress and my lover decided I could use the help and moved to be with me in Eunice. Well, Mom died, I still have my regrets that she wasn't able to finish her days in her home. I am still so saddened. My hetrosexual brothers abandoned my mother & betrayed me. I am still grieving. My partner and I have been together for 30 years and still have absolutely no protection. He is still nothing more than the "roommate" to my family. They haven't missed mass in years.
Thanks for listening.
Cajunboy; I really feel for you concerning your mom. My mother and myself took care of my grandmother up until her passing. None of my Aunts and Uncles *had time*, and they suggested the same fate. I worked at an Asst Living Facility during that time, and I was entirely opposed to the idea. So Grandma lived with us, she still had her wits about her. We had no financial help either from noone and after her passing it was I who took care of all funeral arrangements, the services, the casket, her dress, the whole affair. She and I were roomies til she passed. Watching her go was heart aching. I can't put to words how my heart hurt. But I feel grateful that I had the chance to be with her and do for her. She worried about her funeral expenses, kept a sock full of cash to bury herself. I told her one night, that she needn't worry about it, that I would take care of everything. And I did. I miss her dearly, I miss my father as well. I know I always will.
Tara R

Bristol, FL

#17 Oct 31, 2006
Cajunboy; I see you made a point of letting me know you have read my other posts in this forum. As well as letting me know about you and your partner's situation.

First I feel I must offer you an apology if anything I've posted has offended either of you. As I'm sure it has. I apologize.

I think it's terrible that your siblings have turned their backs on you, not once, but twice...Regardless of their feelings you are their brother. I myself rarely hear from my own siblings, unless there is something they think I can do for them! I can't lie, to say that it angers me would be the least of it. Indeed, it hurts me even moreso. I've broadened my own definition of family to include those who are close to me, who accept me just as I am, help me when I need it, make me laugh when I'd rather cry, call me silly nicnames, pop in for lunch, love me even though they don't have to; their my friends, their my family. I hope you and your partner have a family of your own, I know how much it must hurt and anger you about your sibs. I am sorry for their neglect of the both of you, sha.

Now I have certain beliefs, as you've no doubt seen expressed here and elsewhere, but I do not *hate* as I have been accused. I have known many homosexual people personally and they have known me as well as the remarks I've posted. Which to my chagrine, most of them find amusing.:0) I do not discount their worth because of my beliefs. I know them too well. And they are lovely to me, and I'm always there for them. I asked one onetime, after a heated discussion, why he even bothered with me knowing how I felt. He said it was because he Loved me, I love him too. Of course, he'd known me since I was in diapers.:0)

I've been called a racist on here repeatedly as well, I've been adimant to the fact that I am not such. I do not believe in interracial relations and I do not deny facts when proven to me. Somehow that makes me a racist. I could never be racist, sha...I have a 17 month old great nephew, Jordan, his mother, my neice is white, his father her husband, black. I adore my neice and her son. He's such a cuttyyy!!! I could Never be Racist, you see...

Anyhoo, again I apologize for any offense I've done to the two of you. I hope I have not discouraged you from visiting the forums.

God Bless You Both!! Have a nice Day!!
Tara R

Bristol, FL

#19 Nov 1, 2006
Cajun Boy wrote:
<quoted text>Thanks for responding. Your story is similar to mine in many respects. I commend you for what you did for your mom. That really shows the true character of your heart. I also have been accused of being a racist - that doesn't really bother me. You have your own opinions about gay people and that doesn't concern me. I know quite a few gay people I wouldn't want to associate with either. But it's not because people are black or gay or straight that I don't like them. There are certain behaviors that I find disturbing. And I don't back down from those. I don't like people who are disrespectful to my community by playing music so loudly I can hear it from inside my home. I don't like being hounded for quarters when I'm at the store. I don't like picking up litter from my yard every morning. I resent having to pay for the freeloaders who claim disability or the attitude of those Katrina refugees who were so ungrateful for the 20 large pizzas my neighborhood bought to feed them that they threw most of them in the garbage cans because they preferred bar-b-que and shrimp. You feel the way you do for a reason and I respect whatever that reason is. I have found that I will agree with some people on one forum and then see their posts on another that I consider "way off". There is no need to apologize for your posts. I liked MOST of them and consider them educational and insightful. You seem "smarter than the average bear" and I can sort through things pretty well. Have a great day and enjoy all you can and throw out the rest.:)
Thank you, Cajunboy. It has been a delight sharing with you. I hope the morning sun has found you and yours happy and hopeful. Have a beautiful day! God Bless You!!:0)
Tara R

Bristol, FL

#20 Nov 1, 2006
For Cameron Parish

Marshland Sunset

From the stern of my boat,

I sit and at the sun gloat,

It sets with ease, so many of it have wrote,

Cooler it seems, must go and fetch my coat…

The fish all come to the surface as well,

They are there to watch the sunset too,

I do not say this as just a story to tell,

You can ask any of my loyal crew, in lieu…

I find myself unable to drop another line,

The fish I can see are smarter than I,

They know I am here, telling me to of the sunset watch,

Another day of fishing I have allowed myself to botch…

--Ed Matlack
Tara R

Bristol, FL

#21 Nov 1, 2006
I used to go down to the Mermentau bridge and turn at the dock where Ken Lee's Seafood place was and pass on down to the lil *beach* there on the right and get down to go fishing.
I'd bring my icechest, a five gallon bucket and plenty of shrimp.
I would be after some Redfish but end up with some Sheepheads, Hehe.
I think it was more about just sittin there on the river where it bends and heads out to the marsh. Just enjoying the peaceful and lazy way the Mermentau River took her time in joining with the Gulf.
Don't get me wrong, I left happiest with Redfish in my bucket!!
Sometimes I'd get down right there at Ken's and make my way down to where I was almost under the bridge to cast out and fish the current.
That was always the *best place* to catch some Reds, at least to me.
But all in all, I preferred the lil *beach* to fish. It was calmer there. And the muddy river at sunset back at the bend was more pleasing to my Soul.
I know that that is one thing Rita did not destroy.
Our Mermentau. Our lazy, peaceful, muddy Mermentau.
I miss you, Grand Chenier.
Tara R

Bristol, FL

#22 Nov 1, 2006
The Marsh
Sasha P.,,

Air tasting like salt.

The rising odors of atrocious smelling mud.

The marsh stretches onward toward the sea.

The light brown grass is as sharp as knives.

The sand runs through my hands like sugar

Crystals.

The air is thick,

And settles like a blanket on the marsh.

Hidden among the grass lie crickets,

Chirping their beautiful song.

Birds tweet high above,

Their song echoing all around.

The marsh seems so desolate, so deserted.

And yet I am not alone.
Tara R

Bristol, FL

#24 Nov 2, 2006
Cajun Country
by
Hardy Parkerson

When you're down in Louisiana
On Interstate Highway Ten,
We want you to feel welcome,
So you'll want to come again.

Stop and have a shot of coffee,
When you get to Iowa;
And get the best of food and drink
At any town cafe.

There are crawfish bisque and boudin,
You can smell them in the air;
There are crawfish, shrimp and oysters,
Just waiting for you there.

We'll boil a pot of Cajun shrimp
Out on the open file;
you can eat them with your favorite drink,
Strong or soft, as you desire.

And the Cajuns there will greet you
And lighten up your load;
And help you pass a real good time,
As you pass through on the road.

You might meet Justin Wilson,
Hear his silly Cajun jokes;
Or you might meet Cajun Boudreaux,
Or some other Cajun folks.

You can hear the French accordian
Playin' JOLI BLONDE at nine,
When the Cajuns all kick off their shoes
And have a dancin' time.

For the Cajuns like a FAIS DO DO,
They like a BONNE SOIREE;
The Cajuns like to eat and drink
And pass some revelry.

And if Lady Di were here with us,
She'd eat some crawfish too;
We'd teach her how to crack the tails
Jus like the Cajuns do.

An alligator SAUCE PIQUANTE
We'll cook for you, my friend;
We want to make you happy,
As you pass on Interstate Ten.
Tara R

Bristol, FL

#25 Nov 2, 2006
I know I-10 from the Texas Line to the Mississip. And I've got down at nearly every town in between. Louisiana. I know her back roads too, how to get in and out in a hurry, and which way to go to take my time and enjoy the ride.

And the lil stores, maw and paw types, from one end to the other, My favorites.

Ya get down, fill up your tank, and follow the smell of boudain inside their lil grocery stores. You stand over the rice cookers, usually three or four of em. One with boudain, one with sausage, one with tasso(oh yeah), one with more boudain.

Ya end up at the register with a lil of each, a Coca-Cola, some crackers, and Lots of Napkins. Pay your tab, exchange some *hellos* and *have a good ones* and load back up.

Ya drive out balancing some boudain in one hand and the wheel and a piece of piping hot(I mean HOT)tasso in the other.

It takes you about 5 to 10 minutes to make your way back to I-10. At the exits you pass all the chain-stations with their regular fair, take a bite of boudain, and reenter the hwy.

Was it worth the trouble, going out of the way, to the Maw and Paw place.

Yeah, You Right, Sha.....!!!!:0)

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