Schools may take $852M hit

Would you support a school levy if your district gets a big cut in state funding? Click here to vote and comment. Read more
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northern man

Wayne, OH

#148 Mar 30, 2011
i believe that if they would cut well fare, the state would have all kind of money, cut well fare and no debt, make all those lazy asses get jobs, i dont care what type, work a fast food, be a paying citizen. get a JOB
Memphis

Columbus, OH

#149 Mar 30, 2011
Pragmatic wrote:
Memphis, I went back and read what Arborist and you have been saying and I must say I think you hit the nail on the head in your second paragraph where you say you are not a teacher and can't quantify the value of post graduate educational studies. Seems you can't quantify much else so that probably explains why you make so many personal attacks on Arborist. And it seems you never bothered to answer his/her questions about just what the teacher is learning in all that expensive post graduate work/study, or that it does any good as regards the children. Please answer these questions so I can honestly appreciate what you are trying to say. You sound sincere so I want to benefit from your thinking.
You want me to give you a syllabus for post-graduate educational studies? I already told you I'm not a teacher. But if you are really that interested, I suggest that you ask a teacher who has obtained a master's degree or even contact a university to examine the course of study (Here's OSU's: http://ehe.osu.edu/edtl/academics/ma/ ). If you think that the identified courses of study have no bearing on the "good as regards the children", then it begs the question of what you base your dismissal of these programs on. Is it just a conspiracy of every major university to offer an M.S. in education? Why do the universities seem to think these courses have value?

You ask for this information, but from your tone, you seem more "honestly" interested in making sport. Playing at feigned interest in my sincerity is transparent, argumentative, and weak. Like the other commenter, you ask for the values of post-grad education to be quantified and enumerated as on a balance sheet. I'll admit that I can't do that. But I do know that people who dedicate themselves to the study of virtually any trade, craft, art or practice become better at it the more in-depth they study it. If you can't comprehend that obvious, universal principal, then I wish you well and hope you enjoy your life of mediocrity.
educator

United States

#150 Mar 30, 2011
Right wing elite wrote:
I'm so sick of hearing teachers complain about how bad they have it. So what if they have to get a masters degree? My profession just changed from a masters degree to a doctorate, so guess what I'm working on now? I won't get a pay increase, and neither should teachers. I work 60-70 hours a week and probably don't make more than most teachers. On top of that, I pay 20% of my health insurance and fund my own retirement accounts. Why should the public sector be any different? Learn to take care of yourself like the rest of us have. And, teachers have the whole summer off. If they're really struggling financially, then get a part time job! Stop being lazy and work fulltime like the rest of us. It amazes me that everyone is bashing Kasick for trying to balance the budget. Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't that why people voted him in? They wanted him to clean this state up. So now he's come up with a solution to do so and the public sector is up in arms because it's going to affect them. I'd love to know how the teachers and other union members would like to balance Ohio's budget. Let me guess - increase corporate taxes, right?
Could we please stop describing teachers in such negative terms? Please? I worked in the public sector for 25 years, then switched to teach math in a rural district in southwest Ohio. I'm in my 7th year, and make $37,000 per year. I've never complained about this. I stay after school many, many, days, simply because I want to help students understand that if they really commit to learning, they can experience the satisfaction of understanding and doing well. Having switched professions, I will not receive much in retirement benefits. I am not whining or complaining about this, I only wish that simply because I teach, I am painted as being lazy, a whiner, not used to really working, etc.; I work full-time, and have done so for many, many, years.

Thank you.
beanie

Tiffin, OH

#151 Mar 31, 2011
Bill wrote:
<quoted text>Joe, you are so negative in your comments that you must be a Democrat. Ohio's best days are ahead of it; Kasich is turning the state around; once the businesses move back to Ohio and existing ones expand, people will see Kasich's wisdom. So many of you Democrats are so anti-business.........if you were a businessman would you want to come to Ohio and be trashed by the people and the Democrats when in power?
I hear a pipe dream !
Archibald

Chislehurst, UK

#152 Apr 1, 2011
What is that in pounds please? As a 95 year old former head teacher from Britain who retired in December 1980 the current state of the two nation's systems and the cuts being inflicted to our young, the future of this 21st century seems uncertain more than at any time and I fear for even the near future that I am likely not to see very much more of.
teacher1952

Lancaster, OH

#153 Apr 2, 2011
Arborist wrote:
<quoted text>May I ask Memphis, do you have some solid evidence that getting the masters degree for 3d grade teachers makes them more effective as teachers? What does that extra year or two of advanced college teach the teachers? How to talk to the kids? How to present the materials? How to encourage them? What evidence is there of the teachers being "better" regarding the quality of what they impart to the children? Or is it simply an assumption we will make in order to justify paying them more? Also, if you get what you pay for.......geeeeee, let's pay teachers $300,000 a year and then, since we get what we pay for, we will have all our kids excelling in everything they do. If you are a teacher I think you better return to school and take a "rational thought" course.
Dear Arborist,
My Master's Degree in Teacher Education and an additional 50 hours in behavioral and cultural studies transformed me as a teacher. Advanced coursework gave me the opportunity to learn new reading techniques that were not available to me in my undergraduate work. Research-based material is always altering the methodology that teachers have access to. I was a good teacher before but now I am an outstanding teacher. It must be hard for one outside the school and classroom environment to comprehend the challenges faced by teachers today. I enjoy learning as much as I do teaching.

Every year I meet new students with unique challenges, learning styles, and educational needs. As a special education teacher at the high school level, my classroom is a myriad of unique individuals. I must be prepare each day to meet the emotional and psychological needs of each as well as their academic needs. The dynamics of my classroom are never the same on any given day. It is my personal goal to meet these unique individuals where they are, with all the energy, knowledge, flexibility, humor, love, firmness, creativity, and understanding that I have. I implore you to visit your local public schools as a volunteer or perhaps as a speaker regarding your career as an arborist. Special Education teachers are always appreciative of community members willing to share their career experiences. This way you will be able to share your gifts and see the true picture of public schools today.

In closing, I want you to know that every teacher in my school building is putting forth their best effort day in and day out. It is frustrating for us to open the paper to this constant barrage of negative press. I would never demean your profession in any way and I clearly don't see why you feel an expertise to demean mine. This demoralizing communication affects everyone. Just think of all the positive energy we could create by using more encouraging and uplifting words and actions.
Support SB 5

Grove City, OH

#154 Apr 4, 2011
educator wrote:
<quoted text>
Could we please stop describing teachers in such negative terms? Please? I worked in the public sector for 25 years, then switched to teach math in a rural district in southwest Ohio. I'm in my 7th year, and make $37,000 per year. I've never complained about this. I stay after school many, many, days, simply because I want to help students understand that if they really commit to learning, they can experience the satisfaction of understanding and doing well. Having switched professions, I will not receive much in retirement benefits. I am not whining or complaining about this, I only wish that simply because I teach, I am painted as being lazy, a whiner, not used to really working, etc.; I work full-time, and have done so for many, many, years.
Thank you.
Could we please stop describing teachers in such negative terms? Please?
After watching the way you union teachers act in Wisconsin and Ohio, there's no other way for the public to view you radicals but in negative terms. Public sector workers only make up a little better than 13% of Ohio's workforce,(that includes both administrative non union workers and union workers). Support SB 5. Don't allow the 13% of public sector workers to hold the rest of Ohio hostage.

“American gvt is in the bag”

Since: Sep 10

Location hidden

#155 Apr 4, 2011
Support SB 5 wrote:
<quoted text><quoted text>After watching the way you union teachers act in Wisconsin and Ohio, there's no other way for the public to view you radicals but in negative terms. Public sector workers only make up a little better than 13% of Ohio's workforce,(that includes both administrative non union workers and union workers). Support SB 5. Don't allow the 13% of public sector workers to hold the rest of Ohio hostage.
I disagree. Polls on the opinions of public sector unions actually rose slightly while all those folks were on the news. That's why there is still such a big argument. Instead of "evil union bosses" what people saw on TV were actually just teachers, police and firefighters.
Matt

Columbus, OH

#156 Apr 4, 2011
not a fan wrote:
<quoted text>
Uh, no. People elected Kasich to create jobs. So far, I see him spending a lot of time creating opportunities for those who contributed to his campaign.
Ding, Ding, we have winner. He has a lot of people to pay back, get ready.
educator

Washington, DC

#157 Apr 16, 2011
Support SB 5 wrote:
<quoted text>[QUOTE]Could we please stop describing teachers in such negative terms? Please?"

After watching the way you union teachers act in Wisconsin and Ohio, there's no other way for the public to view you radicals but in negative terms. Public sector workers only make up a little better than 13% of Ohio's workforce,(that includes both administrative non union workers and union workers). Support SB 5. Don't allow the 13% of public sector workers to hold the rest of Ohio hostage.
I am a teacher. I am 60 years old, have taught 7 years. I am holding no one "hostage".
Black Lion

Columbus, OH

#158 Apr 17, 2011
teacher1952 wrote:
<quoted text>
Dear Arborist,
My Master's Degree in Teacher Education and an additional 50 hours in behavioral and cultural studies transformed me as a teacher. Advanced coursework gave me the opportunity to learn new reading techniques that were not available to me in my undergraduate work. Research-based material is always altering the methodology that teachers have access to. I was a good teacher before but now I am an outstanding teacher. It must be hard for one outside the school and classroom environment to comprehend the challenges faced by teachers today. I enjoy learning as much as I do teaching.
Every year I meet new students with unique challenges, learning styles, and educational needs. As a special education teacher at the high school level, my classroom is a myriad of unique individuals. I must be prepare each day to meet the emotional and psychological needs of each as well as their academic needs. The dynamics of my classroom are never the same on any given day. It is my personal goal to meet these unique individuals where they are, with all the energy, knowledge, flexibility, humor, love, firmness, creativity, and understanding that I have. I implore you to visit your local public schools as a volunteer or perhaps as a speaker regarding your career as an arborist. Special Education teachers are always appreciative of community members willing to share their career experiences. This way you will be able to share your gifts and see the true picture of public schools today.
In closing, I want you to know that every teacher in my school building is putting forth their best effort day in and day out. It is frustrating for us to open the paper to this constant barrage of negative press. I would never demean your profession in any way and I clearly don't see why you feel an expertise to demean mine. This demoralizing communication affects everyone. Just think of all the positive energy we could create by using more encouraging and uplifting words and actions.
That's all nice personal enrichment, but a masters degree is not required to teach in the state of ohio. You are on a four-tier system. If you want MORE pay you can apply for a promotion to the third tier in which case you will need a masters, but you don't have to do this to remain employed as a teacher.
Black Lion

Columbus, OH

#159 Jan 14, 2012
Black Lion wrote:
<quoted text>
That's all nice personal enrichment, but a masters degree is not required to teach in the state of ohio. You are on a four-tier system. If you want MORE pay you can apply for a promotion to the third tier in which case you will need a masters, but you don't have to do this to remain employed as a teacher.
Well, here we go again. All those masters degrees(not required in Ohio), step raises, paid health, vision, dental and expensive retirement programs have once again brought a new levy proposal to our March ballot even after voters said no in November. There are no cuts from the teachers as the unions won't give up a nickel. We are running senior citiizens out of Westerville because they can't afford the taxes anymore. Houses that cost a little over $220,000 just five years ago are paying almost $6000 in property taxes, the bulk of which goes to the schools.

Vote no on the new levy proposal. It's time to stop the fat-cat teacher unions.
Catholic Veteran

Tampa, FL

#160 Jan 14, 2012
dlb wrote:
Strong man, General Noriega of Panama closed all public schools before he was captured by the United States and put in prison. Those that really wanted an education didn't miss a beat.
It is said that one can take a horse to water but one can not make him drink. The same can be said for students. I suppose many students are wasting our time and money, but those that really want an a good education will not miss a beat.
The real lesson here for all Ohio residents is don't spend what you don't have.
Adolf Hitler was educated in Public schools, and he closed all the Catholic schools.

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