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Batavia, IL

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#1
Jun 21, 2010
 
Mexican gangs have their own form of spoken and written language that is evident in their graffiti and conversation. Some of words, phrases, terms, gang name translations or numbers to be aware of:

13 = Depicts the letter M; refers to southern California
14 = depicts the letter N; refers to northern California
Barrio =(Varrio) Neighborhood
Cacos = Local Thieves
Carcel = Jail
Carnal (es)= Brother (s)
Chaca = Indian Warrior
Chicano = Mexican American
Chola = Female gangster
Cholo = Gangster
Cuetes = Gun, explosive, firecracker
Salto; En salto = Jump in (initiation)
Ese = "Hey";" What's up?"
Ese's = Chicanos
Guerrero = Warrior
Hasta La Muerte!= Until death!
Hueros = Whites; Anglos (Caucasions)
Hura = Police
Jefe = Boss
Jura = Police
La Eme = Mexican Mafia
La Mugre = Filthy ones
Maldito = Wicked One
MVL = Mi Vida Loca
NF or Ene Efe = Nuestra Familia
Norteno = A gangster from No. Cali.
Paca = Gang beating
Pachuco(a)= Gangster; Cholo
Pedo = Trouble
Pitufos = Smurfs
Placa = Tag or nickname
Playero = Beachgoer
PMV = Por Mi Vida
Por Mi Vida = For my life
Primo = Cousin
Puto Marks = Cross outs (graffiti)
Rata = Rat: Snitch
Raza = Race
Sombras = Shadows
Sureno= A gangster from So. Cali
Travieso = Misfit
Vago = Vagrant
Vato = Homie
VL = Vato Loco
XIII = 13
XIV = 14
XVIII = 18
Yerba = Marijuana

Maintaining close tabs on Mexican gangs is important. While they are rapidly increasing in numbers, they are stepping up their acts of violence. Many times, innocent people are victims of their violent behavior, especially those who are celebrating a family function when the gangsters decide to crash. There are several murders still under investigation that have not been solved with an arrest of a perpetrator.

These gangsters are spreading to all types of neighborhoods, cities and towns. Rural areas with farms to work, major cities with restaurants to man and suburban areas with construction jobs to complete are prone to these types of gangs forming.

These gang members will offer ID when approached by law enforcement, but mounting numbers of fraudulent alien cards, driver's licenses and social security cards are being confiscated from gang members. When dealing with them, analyze their documents carefully.

Most importantly, Mexican gang members can be very dangerous! This can be true for three reasons. First, they consider themselves Cholos (gangsters) and are probably involved in criminal activity, second, they view law enforcement as an enemy and third, they may be an illegal alien. Be careful!
Hula

Batavia, IL

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#2
Jun 21, 2010
 
Mexican Prison gang members

According to Robert Fong (1990), the Mafia's Constitution outlines 12 principal rules.

Membership is for life, meaning "blood in, blood out."
Every member must be prepared to sacrifice his life or take another's life at any time when required
Every member shall strive to overcome his weakness to achieve discipline within the MEXIKANEMI brotherhood
Never let the MEXIKANEMI down
The sponsoring member is totally responsible for the behavior of the new recruit. If the new recruit turns out to be a traitor, it is the sponsoring member's responsibility to eliminate the recruit
When disrespected by a stranger or a group, all members of the MEXIKANEMI will unite to destroy the person or the other group completely
Always maintain a high level of integrity
Never release the MEXIKANEMI business to others
Every member has the right to express opinions, ideas, contradictions and constructive criticisms
Every member has the right to organize, educate, arm, and defend the MEXIKANEMI
Every member has the right to wear the tattoo of the MEXIKANEMI symbol
The MEXIKANEMI is a criminal organization and therefore will participate in all aspects of criminal interest for monetary benefits (Constitution of the Mexican Mafia of Texas).

The Mexican Mafia operate on a paramilitary structure, complete with a president, vice president, and numerous generals, captains, lieutenants and sergeants. Below these high-ranking members are soldiers, also known as "carnales," as well as suppliers and associates, all of whose activities are overseen by the generals. Only one general operates in the federal prison system, while another one operates in the state prison system. The state general appoints a committee of lieutenants and captains who command prison units across the entire state.
Hula

Batavia, IL

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#3
Jun 21, 2010
 
Understanding East Coast Mexican gangs, Part 2
In Part 1 of this special series, I shared background on the early stages of Mexican gangs taking root on the East Coast and gave insight into some of their foundational principles and methods of operation.
In this second and final part, I’ll share information on their graffiti, tattoos, code language and their propensity for violence.
Graffiti
Mexican gang graffiti is more simplistic and to the point than other street gang graffiti. In one tattoo, Vagos is abbreviated by taking the first, middle and last letters of the gang name to create the gangs version of an acronym.(V.G.S.) This abbreviation technique is extremely common in Mexican gangs on the East Coast. Their graffiti seldom uses symbols and needs almost no interpretation. As is plainly stated in the picture above, Vagos are prominent around the area of West 116 Street in New York City. Gangs like the Vagos (aka 'Los Vagos') and other Mexican gangs will frequently insert a reference to 100% which means 100 percent gangster or “I am in to this gang life 100 percent.”
Tattoos
Although their graffiti is less symbolic than other gangs, their tattoos are highly symbolic in nature. Common to these gangsters is a picture of a pair of praying hands, which signify praying to God for forgiveness.
The Our Lady of Guadalupe icon is another favorite tattoo worn by gang members.
The Cholo (Gangster) symbol, which signifies the struggle for acceptance in America during the 1940s, is frequently tattooed on the bodies of Mexican Gang members.“Choloization” is the transition an individual makes away from the surrounding culture into a sub-culture. This is viewed by Mexican and Mexican American youth as their new socialization into a gang.
During the early 20th century Mexican American youth donned “Zoot Suits” as an expression of their individuality. The subculture of the Zoot Suiters was blamed for the 1943 Zoot Suit Riots, an altercation between sailors and Zoot Suiters that resulted in a 10-day riot in Los Angeles. It is still unclear today which group was really responsible for the melee.
These tattoos are extremely meaningful to the Mexican gang banger. Phrases tattooed on their bodies like Mi Vida Loca (My Crazy Life) and Perdoname Mi Madre (Forgive Me Mother) are also symbolic of their awareness of their gangster life and how it is unaccepted by their family and others. These words or phrases will be tattooed in Old English style of printing.
Many Mexican gangsters will tattoo the web of their hands with drawings symbolic of their specialty within the gang. These hand tattoos are common among other Latino gangs present throughout North America. In some hardcore cases, these symbols will be burned into the hand.
Hula

Batavia, IL

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#4
Jun 21, 2010
 
Turf
Mexican gang turf during the mid 90s on the East Coast was mostly temporary or non-existent. These gangs, consisting of illegal aliens, were hesitant to remain in one neighborhood for any significant length of time. They were very nomadic and fled to neighborhoods miles away at the slightest hint of pressure from the authorities. They were careful to write graffiti and tags inside of buildings rather than out.
As the late 1990's rolled in, Mexican gangs were claiming turf and hanging out in large groups without worry. Graffiti marking their turf, became bold and superfluous. Large graffiti tags with the gang’s name and membership roll call were now commonplace. Common turf for these gangs were neighborhoods with small apartments near restaurants and stores where they were employed. Today, these gang members will travel miles to work and stand on busy street corners in 'shape-up' groups to obtain a day’s work from contactors seeking cheap labor.
Making money is another use for the gang's turf and street corner drug sales are becoming a more popular way of doing so. As drug use increased among gang members and other Mexicans, the demand brought the gangs into the new millennium. Gangs claiming turf in highly traveled areas of some cities are gaining quite a clientele of drug customers, from a variety of ethnic background, and raking in profits.
Colors
Most Mexican gangs prefer the colors of the Mexican flag, green, white and red, as their gang's representative colors. There are, however, several gangs which have adopted other colors. On the East Coast, many Mexican gangs have adopted beads with their representative colors. They were influenced by other Hispanic gangs like the Latin Kings, La Familia and Netas which were using beaded necklaces since the 1980's.
Beads, bandanas and color-coordinated clothing are now standard alliance representations for Mexican gangs. When checking for a gang's colors or markings, look under a gangster's hat, on the rear of a belt, inside a knapsack or inside a pant's pocket. Mexican gang members are used to hiding their affiliation from the larger, more violent gangs like the Bloods and Latin Kings. And because of the recent violence connected to Mexican gangs, they will hide their affiliation from the police.
Tattoos like the one above are memorials to gang violence
Most violence involving Mexican gangs involves other Mexican gangs and their own countrymen, but external gang violence involving Mexican gang members is rapidly increasing. Incidents of Mexican gang violence will occur after a disrespectful act (dis') by a rival gang member precipitated from a shout out at a nightclub, party or celebration. When rival gangs are present at such functions, it doesn't require much of an incident to start an altercation.
Other acts of violence can occur when there is no other rival gang in sight but an opportunity to show their machismo. These acts often occur during Baptism celebrations, weddings, sweet sixteen parties and other family gatherings crashed by Mexican gangsters who are friends with the DJ or one of the attendees.
Mexican gangsters will crash the party drunk and take any opportunity as a chance to show his worth and gain respect in the eyes of his vatos (homies).
Other forms of disrespect among Mexican gangs have been shown in graffiti cross-outs, written derogatory statements or aggressive paintings, drawings and murals. One such derogatory drawing was seized from a member of the Chicano Nation (CN) who shows himself tearing off the head of the leader of their rival gang, La Escuadron (SDN).
Hula

Batavia, IL

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#5
Jun 21, 2010
 
Prison break - Mexican gang moves operations outside US jails
By Jay S Albanese
04 December 2008


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The Mexican Mafia is the oldest prison gang in the United States. Originally it consisted of young Mexican-American gang members, who organised in a Californian prison in 1957. Its name was chosen in imitation of Italian-American Cosa Nostra groups. Also called "La Eme" (the Spanish phonetic for the letter M), members of the Mexican Mafia largely hail from the barrios of eastern Los Angeles.

Originally a self-protection racket, the group expanded its activities to include drug trafficking and extortionate debt collection. Inside prisons, the Mexican Mafia usually victimises African-American and Caucasian inmates, rather than Mexicans, although it exacts violent retribution on those who become police informants.

According to FBI memos from the 1970s, obtained through the Freedom of Information Act: "The Mexican Mafia is only one of the many prison groups that are violently demonstrating their powers, both within penal institutions and on the street. The Mexican Mafia's plans on the street include the takeover of drugs in California." The events of the past 30 years demonstrate a concerted effort by the Mexican Mafia to carry out those plans.

The level of threat posed by the Mexican Mafia is therefore high in southern California, the southwestern US and in areas where local drug trafficking is controlled by Hispanic gangs.

Image: US Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers in Los Angeles check a tattoo on a suspected gang member's back to log any identifiable gang affiliation in 2008. Mexican Mafia members are distinguished by their many tattoos, most notably a black hand on their chest called "the black hand of death".(PA photos)
Hula

Batavia, IL

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#6
Jun 21, 2010
 
Mexican Drug Cartels Now Recruiting Hit Men From U.S. Military
August 20, 2009

While this is the first known instance of a U.S. soldier working as an assassin for the drug cartels, this may simply be a consequence of the evolving threat posed to this country by the cartels, as well as a result of the criminal gang activity which now exists in the U.S. military.

In April 2009, the FBI released a statement on the growing problem of gangs in the military, and the threat they now pose to U.S. police officers. What follows is an excerpt from that statement:

“Gang members with military training pose a unique threat to law enforcement personnel because of the distinctive military skills that they possess and their willingness to teach these skills to fellow gang members. While the number of gang members trained by the military is unknown, the threat that they pose to law enforcement is potentially significant, particularly if gang members trained in weapons, tactics, and planning pass this instruction on to other gang members.”

{snip} However, FBI gang investigator Jennifer Simon said in a recent article:“Gang membership in the U.S. Armed Forces is disproportional to the U.S. population.”

The prevailing estimate among most experts is that out of every 100 people who enter the military, at least two are gang members.

One of the reasons for the increasing number of gang members joining the military, is the fact that the lowering of recruiting standards, mainly by the Army. Of course, this is due to the two wars dragging on in Afghanistan and Iraq.

According to the Michael D. Palm Center at the University of California, between 2003 and 2006, recruiters allowed 4,230 convicted criminals into the Army.
Hula

Batavia, IL

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#7
Jun 21, 2010
 
LOOK HOME BOY MEXICAN MAFIA M M L A E M E
WE ARE TAKING OVER WHITE BALTIMORE COUNTY TOWNS
OF DUNDALK ROSEDALE PARKVILLE middle river
essex overlea brooklyn park some areas of anne arundel county areas 18th street gang sets are
getting stronger and stronger over here in
baltimore pico locos shatto park locos broadway and
7th street locos claton 14 gang 38th street wild
boys 21street locos see over here in baltimore
are mexican population has grown ese ms13 they
have their sets over here to but we mm, l a e m e
mexican mafia are making money in towson because
we sale to college kids we are in mostly eastern
baltimore county and in the city 18th street gang
mt washighton north baltimore patterson park east side highlandtown and brooklyn south side WE MEXICAN MAFIA 18TH STREET GANG KICKING ASS ESE

Posted May 14, 2010
Hula

Batavia, IL

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#8
Jun 21, 2010
 
Turf

Mexican gang turf during the mid 90s on the East Coast was mostly temporary or non-existent. These gangs, consisting of illegal aliens, were hesitant to remain in one neighborhood for any significant length of time. They were very nomadic and fled to neighborhoods miles away at the slightest hint of pressure from the authorities. They were careful to write graffiti and tags inside of buildings rather than out.

As the late 1990's rolled in, Mexican gangs were claiming turf and hanging out in large groups without worry. Graffiti marking their turf, became bold and superfluous. Large graffiti tags with the gang’s name and membership roll call were now commonplace. Common turf for these gangs were neighborhoods with small apartments near restaurants and stores where they were employed. Today, these gang members will travel miles to work and stand on busy street corners in 'shape-up' groups to obtain a day’s work from contactors seeking cheap labor.

Making money is another use for the gang's turf and street corner drug sales are becoming a more popular way of doing so. As drug use increased among gang members and other Mexicans, the demand brought the gangs into the new millennium. Gangs claiming turf in highly traveled areas of some cities are gaining quite a clientele of drug customers, from a variety of ethnic background, and raking in profits.
Hula

Batavia, IL

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#9
Jun 21, 2010
 
"What used to be all money is now all guns," said Troy Peterson, commander of the narcotics unit at the Harrison County Sheriff's Department. "The Mexican cartel wants any weapons they can get to fight the war they're having in Mexico right now. Without a doubt, they are definitely here, but they work in cells. Some are mixed in with [legitimate] workers. Some come in town and set up shop like a business. It's a front. There are several of those we've identified. They're doing a legitimate business, but it's also a front for drugs, guns and
Hula

Batavia, IL

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#10
Jun 21, 2010
 
Peterson would not identify any businesses suspected of being fronts for criminal activity because of ongoing investigations, but he did say, "They are spread out all over the coast."

Those setting up these businesses, Peterson said, stand to bring in substantial earnings because they make more in drug money than it costs to buy and smuggle assault weapons back into Mexico, even with the payments they are expected to make to Mexican Mafia members.

Authorities also said many of the Mexican-American criminals end up in Southern states such as Mississippi because it's considered a prime location to do business.

"It's easy because we have the interstate that feeds right back into Mexico," Peterson said.

Long before Katrina, South Mississippi law enforcement officers were warned that the bad would follow the good across the Mexican border, east to the Mississippi coast.

"We received intelligence that a large group of Hispanic people would come here to work and a mix of gang members would be with them," Biloxi Police Capt. John Miller said.

"We really haven't seen a gang problem like we thought we would, but we have established that we do have members of the Mexican Mafia street gangs here. We try to identify who they are. We try to stay on top of it - and we have no intention of letting a gang problem fester here."

FBI agents, along with other South Mississippi law enforcement officers, have worked many cases in recent years in which Mexican Mafia influence is suspected. Some of those cases are ongoing, and authorities say they can't reveal details at this time about them.

"Historically, local drug-trafficking organizations in the Pascagoula ... area routinely traveled to Texas to obtain supplies of cocaine and marijuana for their organizations," Breedlove said.

"However, a new supply market developed with the influx of a large number of Hispanics, particularly Mexicans, relocating to Jackson County."

Many of those associated with the Mexican Mafia are members of Hispanic-American street gangs, such as MS-13 or Mara Salvatrucha, the Los Zetas, or Zetas, and others.

Public awareness of the Mexican Mafia's connection to South Mississippi surfaced in mid-July after assault weapons used in a high-profile double murder in Pensacola, Fla., were traced back to a Moss Point home.

Florida authorities believe the killings are linked to the Mexican Mafia.

It was less than two weeks after the July 9 slayings of Florida residents Byrd and Melanie Billings that agents with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives came to South Mississippi to seize assault weapons used in the crime.

Eight people were arrested in the case, including the wife of Gulf Breeze, Fla., resident Hugh Wiggins, who authorities said was granted limited immunity after he led them to the house in Moss Point where the weapons were found.

In all, agents seized two Mossberg 12-gauge shotguns, a MAK-90 assault rifle, a Ruger Mini-14 and a .223-caliber AR variant rifle, along with accessories that included ammunition, scopes, magazines and gun cases.

They also found, court records show, two-way radios that Hugh Wiggins threw out the window of a van he was in while traveling through Jackson County.

Florida court records later released in the case show that a man, interviewed as a witness in the case, identified Hugh Wiggins as someone who referred to himself as a professional gun-runner - exactly the type of professional with whom authorities say Mexican Mafia members and their associates would be interested in doing business.
Hula

Batavia, IL

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#11
Jun 21, 2010
 
Peterson would not identify any businesses suspected of being fronts for criminal activity because of ongoing investigations, but he did say, "They are spread out all over the coast."
Those setting up these businesses, Peterson said, stand to bring in substantial earnings because they make more in drug money than it costs to buy and smuggle assault weapons back into Mexico, even with the payments they are expected to make to Mexican Mafia members.
Hula

Batavia, IL

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#12
Jun 21, 2010
 
Authorities also said many of the Mexican-American criminals end up in Southern states such as Mississippi because it's considered a prime location to do business.
"It's easy because we have the interstate that feeds right back into Mexico," Peterson said.
Long before Katrina, South Mississippi law enforcement officers were warned that the bad would follow the good across the Mexican border, east to the Mississippi coast.
"We received intelligence that a large group of Hispanic people would come here to work and a mix of gang members would be with them," Biloxi Police Capt. John Miller said.
"We really haven't seen a gang problem like we thought we would, but we have established that we do have members of the Mexican Mafia street gangs here. We try to identify who they are. We try to stay on top of it - and we have no intention of letting a gang problem fester here."
FBI agents, along with other South Mississippi law enforcement officers, have worked many cases in recent years in which Mexican Mafia influence is suspected. Some of those cases are ongoing, and authorities say they can't reveal details at this time about them.
"Historically, local drug-trafficking organizations in the Pascagoula ... area routinely traveled to Texas to obtain supplies of cocaine and marijuana for their organizations," Breedlove said.
"However, a new supply market developed with the influx of a large number of Hispanics, particularly Mexicans, relocating to Jackson County."
Many of those associated with the Mexican Mafia are members of Hispanic-American street gangs, such as MS-13 or Mara Salvatrucha, the Los Zetas, or Zetas, and others.
Public awareness of the Mexican Mafia's connection to South Mississippi surfaced in mid-July after assault weapons used in a high-profile double murder in Pensacola, Fla., were traced back to a Moss Point home.
Florida authorities believe the killings are linked to the Mexican Mafia.
It was less than two weeks after the July 9 slayings of Florida residents Byrd and Melanie Billings that agents with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives came to South Mississippi to seize assault weapons used in the crime.
Eight people were arrested in the case, including the wife of Gulf Breeze, Fla., resident Hugh Wiggins, who authorities said was granted limited immunity after he led them to the house in Moss Point where the weapons were found.
In all, agents seized two Mossberg 12-gauge shotguns, a MAK-90 assault rifle, a Ruger Mini-14 and a .223-caliber AR variant rifle, along with accessories that included ammunition, scopes, magazines and gun cases.
They also found, court records show, two-way radios that Hugh Wiggins threw out the window of a van he was in while traveling through Jackson County.
Florida court records later released in the case show that a man, interviewed as a witness in the case, identified Hugh Wiggins as someone who referred to himself as a professional gun-runner - exactly the type of professional with whom authorities say Mexican Mafia members and their associates would be interested in doing business.
Peterson would not identify any businesses suspected of being fronts for criminal activity because of ongoing investigations, but he did say, "They are spread out all over the coast."
Those setting up these businesses, Peterson said, stand to bring in substantial earnings because they make more in drug money than it costs to buy and smuggle assault weapons back into Mexico, even with the payments they are expected to make to Mexican Mafia members.
Authorities also said many of the Mexican-American criminals end up in Southern states such as Mississippi because it's considered a prime location to do business.
"It's easy because we have the interstate that feeds right back into Mexico," Peterson said.
Hula

Batavia, IL

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#13
Jun 21, 2010
 
The Immigrant Gang Plague
Heather Mac Donald EMAIL

In one respect, Central American immigrants break the mold of traditional American underclass behavior: they work. Even so, Mexican welfare receipt is twice as high as that of natives, in large part because Mexican-American incomes are so low, and remain low over successive generations. Disturbingly, welfare use actually rises between the second and third generation—to 31 percent of all third-generation Mexican-American households. Illegal Hispanics make liberal use of welfare, too, by putting their American-born children on public assistance: in Orange County, California, nearly twice as many Hispanic welfare cases are for children of illegal aliens as for legal families.
More troublingly, some Hispanics combine work with gangbanging. Gang detectives in Long Island’s Suffolk County know when members of the violent Salvadoran MS-13 gang get off work from their lawn-maintenance or pizzeria jobs, and can follow them to their gang meetings. Mexican gang members in rural Pennsylvania, which saw two gang homicides in late April, also often work in landscaping and construction.
On the final component of underclass behavior—school failure—Hispanics are in a class by themselves. No other group drops out in greater numbers. In Los Angeles, only 48 percent of Hispanic ninth-graders graduate, compared with a 56 percent citywide graduation rate and a 70 percent nationwide rate. In 2000, nearly 30 percent of Hispanics between the ages of 16 and 24 were high school dropouts nationwide, compared with about 13 percent of blacks and about 7 percent of whites.
Yet a seemingly innocuous block in Santa Ana can host five to eight households dedicated to gangbanging or drug sales. A front yard may be relatively trash-free; inside the house, a different matter entirely, says Santa Ana cop Kevin Ruiz.“I’ve been to three houses just this week where they made a mountain of trash in the backyard or changed their baby’s diaper by throwing it over the couch. They don’t use the indoor plumbing, while letting their dogs go to the bathroom on the carpet.” Ruiz drives by the modest tract home where his Mexican father, who worked in Orange County’s farming industry, raised him in the 1950s. A car with a shattered windshield, a trailer, and minivan sit in the backyard, surrounded by piles of junk and a mattress leaning on the garage door. Ruiz’s observations will strike anyone who has hired eager Mexican and Central American workers as incredible. I pressed him repeatedly, insisting that Americans see Mexican immigrants as cheerful and hardworking, but he was adamant.“We’re creating an underclass,” he maintained.
Illegl Immigrnts MostCrme

Batavia, IL

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#14
Jun 21, 2010
 
Illegal Immigrant Gangs Commit Most U.S. Crime
A soon-to-be-released FBI report sheds some more light on those “hard-working Americans” infiltrating our cities:
Criminal street gangs—mostly comprised of illegal immigrants—are responsible for the majority of violent crimes in the United States and are the primary distributors of most illicit drugs.
The alarming, but not surprising, information is revealed in a new report published by the Justice Department’s National Gang Intelligence Center (NGIC), an FBI task force created in 2005 to curb the growing threat of violent gangs in the U.S. The NGIC teams up with state and local law enforcement agencies throughout the nation to enforce, study and intercept gangs and has published several reports documenting their activities.
The agency’s latest publication has not been made public but a national newspaper revealed some of its findings this week. It says that up to 80% of crime in the U.S. is committed by gangs and that gang membership in this country has grown to 1 million, an increase of 200,000 in the last few years.
Additionally, gangs are the “primary retail-level distributors of most illicit drugs” in the U.S. and several are sophisticated enough to compete with major Mexican drug-trafficking cartels. Most of the country’s state and local enforcement agencies have reported gang activity in their jurisdiction and the problem will only get worse, according to the FBI.
In fact, a high-ranking FBI director said gangs have followed the migration paths of illegal alien laborers to avoid big-city police departments that have cracked down on their activities. An example is the notoriously violent Salvadoran gang known as Mara Salvatrucha or MS-13, which has spread throughout the U.S.—to at least 42 states—and continues expanding.
In 2008 alone MS-13 members, all illegal immigrants with previous criminal records, committed atrocious crimes that received ample media coverage. In San Francisco an MS-13 gang banger murdered a father and son with an assault weapon because their car blocked his from making a turn. In Los Angeles an MS-13 member just released from prison murdered a high school football star as the teen jock walked home from the mall. In Maryland a 14-year-old honors high school student was shot to death on a crowded public bus by a Salvadoran illegal alien who proudly revealed he belonged to the MS-13.
danny

Pikesville, MD

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#15
Nov 14, 2010
 
la e m e mexican mafia gangs are in baltimore and
washighton dc metro areas here in 2010 we have
men that call them selfs cholos and females call them
selfs cholas latin girl gangs in maryland are new
and they are latin queens ms13 girls and the 18th street
cholas girls they run drugs for they gang sets here
in baltimore and the washighton dc metro areas these
girls carry guns just like the men do no not all but
some but i live here in baltimore and work for the
baltimore f b i we have members from the 18th street
mexican mafia gang that has made its way out to
the counyies of baltimore dundalk middle river essex
towson rosedale overlea parkville brooklyn park lansdowne maryland they have gang sets in these towns
and in the city of baltimore areas of south east baltimore patterson park highlandtown caton and over
in the baltimore highlands area and the brooklyn area
of south west area of the city now black gangs have
their gang areas in park heights sandtown winchester
oldtown area of east baltimore dunbar gywnn oaks liberty
heights area of north west baltimore and cherry hill
area of south east baltimore and pats of north east baltimore each gang has rules and gang codes here in
baltimore if one gang cross over in to a other gang
neighborhood its bad news for them we as the united states f b i is working real hard to stop these gangs
from killing over drug blocks here in baltimore and
other maryland countyies the 18th street gang has made
it hard for other gangs like ms13 and latin kings here
in baltimore metro we have 30 major street gangs here
in baltimore city they are working in the drug trade
sex trade thats how they make money and music hip hop
mostly the african american gangs we have undercover
police working out here on these streets day and not
to stop these bad people we jamaican gangsters dominican
gangsters that kill you for their money here in baltimore my name is danny moss from the baltimore f b i
we have bloods from new york baltimore now even some
from losangeles crips from new york baltimore losangeles
black gangster disciples and vice lords have came here
to baltimore like three years ago to set up shop
most of them have left and some are in jail now
the black gangster disciples and vice lords have mostly
baltimore members now thin we have crip sets and blood
sets that are run by baltimore locos 18th street gang members are from dallas houston and mexico towns with
loco mexican youth latin kings members from new york
new jersy areas ms13 members are from the washighton dc
area dominicans are here from new york area of washighton heights up in harlem ddp dominicans dont play
thin white gangs tirgers dead man i n c polor bears
these are white gangs here in baltimore that are in
the drug trade
Rock

Los Angeles, CA

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#16
Apr 4, 2012
 

Judged:

1

I think half.of these comments is bull. The guy claiming to be with the f b i cant even spell and the other guy.claiming the mexican mafia is.in baltimore, for one if he was part of eMe he wouldnt be on a computer running his mouth about it and telling their bizz.
east coaster real one

Elizabeth, NJ

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#18
Jun 21, 2013
 

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This guy is bogus, a lot of mispellings. And besides, ddp, The Dominicans are not a major gang, mostly herbs
hmmm

Oxford, PA

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#20
Jul 20, 2013
 

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How many people know the total membership of the gang Dominicans don't play?
AnswerDominican Don't Play Gang is a Dominican-American street gang situated in Manhattan, New York in the early 1990s. They are known for mostly using axes and knives as weapons. They are involved in criminal activities like drug-trafficking, killings, arms, trafficking, assault and extortion. No one knows the total membership of the gang Dominicans Don't Play.

Do yor research
Uh Oh

Lancaster, PA

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#21
Aug 6, 2013
 

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east coaster real one wrote:
This guy is bogus, a lot of mispellings. And besides, ddp, The Dominicans are not a major gang, mostly herbs
Dominicans Don’t Play member held on attempted murder charge
The New Jersey and New York Dominicans Don’t Play street gangs were at war when a gunman walked up and opened fire on a surprised crew in Hackensack, starting a 13-month investigation capped by this week’s arrest of Manuel A. Falcon-Lopez of West New York.

Falcon-Lopez, 22, is charged with attempted murder and illegal weapons possession.

Falcon-LopezIt’s the first major case brought down by the Bergen prosecutor’s office in tandem with Hackensack police since Chief Ken Zisa was suspended without pay for insurance fraud and misconduct.

According to witnesses, Falcon and a group of others came up on the Hackensack crew outside a house on Campbell Avenue on April 19, 2009.

Falcon fired off three shots, none of which, fortunately, hit anyone, said Bergen County Prosecutor John L. Molinelli.

Falcon, who lives on Park Avenue just off 55th Street, was arrested late Thursday at his job as a stock room clerk at the Home Depot on Bloomfield Avenue in Clifton by officers from the prosecutor‘s office and Hackensack and Clifton police departments.

He’s being held on $50,000 bail at the Bergen County Jail in Hackensack pending grand jury action.

Many other DDP news stories available...google it

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