“Vote Republican”

Since: Aug 08

Wyandanch, NY

#41962 Aug 19, 2013
TSF wrote:
Just did some checking: Results:
Think Like a Baby-pre-school prep NYC tuition $29,800 per year
Convent of The Sacred Heart NYC tuition $32,680 per year
The Becken School NYC tuition $26,000 per year
Accredited Online School (Quaker) NYC tuition $30, 450 per year
The list goes on.
Didn't find the school with tuition of $5000. Which one is it?
+<quoted text>
Great find, yes NYC has some elite schools with tuition rates that exceed many colleges and universities. I am speaking of the typical and local Catholic education. These schools have rates that are well below the city system. Now, these schools do not have to contend with teachers salaries because they are being taught by Nuns.

My brother put himself through St. Johns on Long Island in the early 90s. He paid for it himself, and his tuition was $1,900 including books. We were very poor, and he was more motivated than poor. He ended up going to a sh!tty college, but his SAT scores were also crap. He went to Buffalo State College to be near me. I attended and played for the University at Buffalo. We open up with Ohio State this year, wish us luck.
State of Denial

Mount Holly, NC

#41963 Aug 19, 2013
Dang wrote:
(Newser)Ė With school budgets being slashed across the country, more and more teachers are paying for classroom supplies with their own money, according to a new study. The survey, by Horace Mann insurance, found 26% of teachers polled reported spending $400 of their own hard-earned on school supplies last yearóup 3% from 2011óand 53% said their school's budget had been cut, reports USA Today. DonorsChoose.org , a charity that helps teachers raise money for supplies, says requests from teachers grew 30% last year.
A 23-year-old elementary school teacher in North Carolina says she does babysitting work on the side to help buy extra supplies for her classroom. "I only have $100 from the school for the whole year to buy supplies, and it's not enough," she tells USA Today. "I even had to buy shelves and a stool for the kids to stand on to wash their hands at the sink." "Of course we're not forced to spend our money," says another teacher in Indiana. "But some of these kids don't even get breakfast before they come to school, so we buy them snacks and treats." Who says I'm not fair and balanced?!
It's called free breakfast and lunch, per the government. I don't have a problem with this at all. Times are hard and I never want to see a child hungry.

All over the local and national news there's been numerous stories about providing school supplies for underprivileged children.

Maybe there should be school supplies drives for supplies for teachers who don't have enough. JUST maybe the government doesn't have to provide children with Ipads and computers and that would be a great savings for regular classroom supplies.

Do you not think if the teacher only has $100 for classroom supplies SOMEONE in the public school system might need to look around and decide teachers need chalk and other items for the classroom. Hell, I don't have an Ipad and I can afford one. Our children have come far too dependent upon computerized methods of learning. How many kids do you think could make change at McDonalds or a grocery store if all computerized methods of math were taken away?

“Vote Republican”

Since: Aug 08

Wyandanch, NY

#41964 Aug 19, 2013
TSF wrote:
Just did some checking: Results:
Think Like a Baby-pre-school prep NYC tuition $29,800 per year
Convent of The Sacred Heart NYC tuition $32,680 per year
The Becken School NYC tuition $26,000 per year
Accredited Online School (Quaker) NYC tuition $30, 450 per year
The list goes on.
Didn't find the school with tuition of $5000. Which one is it?
+<quoted text>
Yes, Rutgers Day costs more than Rutgers University. Princeton Day costs half as much as Princeton University. St Johns University costs as little as many in state schools in PA and NY. So, you will find a wide dichotomy. The point is, educational expenses vary and the public system has been ripping off the tax-payer for many decades relating success with a dollar, when it is not true. Giving a raise to the maintenance guy will not ensure that Johnny can work with standard deviations.

However, cutting music and art will compromise the educational experience. Administrators who earn $200,000 a year salaries when you have students with a 40% dropout rate need to be let go. Teachers in NYC fail the math regents at a 25% rate should never be in the classroom. That is because we hire failures in our school system. We hire people who could not pass college math, so they because math teachers. They could not pass accounting, so they became business educators. They could not play a trumpet, so they became music teachers.

So, we have unmotivated people teaching unmotivated kids. And, their parents in many cases are just as unmotivated.

“Vote Republican”

Since: Aug 08

Wyandanch, NY

#41965 Aug 19, 2013
TSF, I attribute the cost of education to an illusion. For example, I was speaking with a white privileged parent one day who told me our boys are some of the best lacrosse players in Union County, and likely NC. I told him; ďNo, our boys are among the best players who have parents who can afford to spend $2,400 for equipment, and another $1,100 for participating, and another $5,000 on hotel and other travel costs.Ē Iím sure there are some kids from (you name the inner city) who would kick both our kidsí butts if they were given the same opportunities. The illusion that our children are better because I have a little more cash is a joke. My kids will be successful because they are motivated. They will fail, because they are not motivated. However, because, I have greater resources, I have provided an incentive that help to motivate them. That my friend is not an illusion.
State of Denial

Mount Holly, NC

#41966 Aug 19, 2013
This is a fine private school in Gaston County. They also provide financial aide.

http://www.gastonday.org/welcome
Splendid Tiger

United States

#41967 Aug 19, 2013
I Hate Syracuse wrote:
<quoted text>Great find, yes NYC has some elite schools with tuition rates that exceed many colleges and universities. I am speaking of the typical and local Catholic education. These schools have rates that are well below the city system. Now, these schools do not have to contend with teachers salaries because they are being taught by Nuns.
My brother put himself through St. Johns on Long Island in the early 90s. He paid for it himself, and his tuition was $1,900 including books. We were very poor, Iand he was more motivated than poor. He ended up going to a sh!tty college, but his SAT scores were also crap. He went to Buffalo State College to be near me. I attended and played for the University at Buffalo. We open up with Ohio State this year, wish us luck.
You will need a miracle buddy.Ohio State will grind yogi up like stale Cheetos.and spit you out like a bad loogie.Buffalo.What a town, cowering in the shadow of omnipresent NYC.
Dang

Lenoir, NC

#41968 Aug 19, 2013
State of Denial wrote:
<quoted text>
It's called free breakfast and lunch, per the government. I don't have a problem with this at all. Times are hard and I never want to see a child hungry.
All over the local and national news there's been numerous stories about providing school supplies for underprivileged children.
Maybe there should be school supplies drives for supplies for teachers who don't have enough. JUST maybe the government doesn't have to provide children with Ipads and computers and that would be a great savings for regular classroom supplies.
Do you not think if the teacher only has $100 for classroom supplies SOMEONE in the public school system might need to look around and decide teachers need chalk and other items for the classroom. Hell, I don't have an Ipad and I can afford one. Our children have come far too dependent upon computerized methods of learning. How many kids do you think could make change at McDonalds or a grocery store if all computerized methods of math were taken away?
Kids? "What is the average age of a McDonald's employee?
Email
We employ 91,500 people of all ages, from school leaving age to people in their 80s, who tell us that working at McDonald&#146;s helps keep them young.
We&#146;re one of the UK&#146;s biggest providers of first-time jobs and 42% of our employees are under 21. The average age of an hourly-paid employee is 20." http://www.mcdonalds.co.uk/ukhome/whatmakesmc... Now, 2 decades old and can not make change, we are doomed as a competing nation. Most countries in the urban areas have "street venders/markets". The people working them are forced to "think on their feet", just look at the straw market in the Bahama's. They do the percentage's in their head and quickly I might add, or they lose the sale.
Dang

Lenoir, NC

#41969 Aug 19, 2013
"Speaking of food, a sample budget put together by Visa Inc. and McDonald's Corp. is rocketing around the Internet. Most of the commentary suggests that McDonald's is heartless, and gauche, to suggest how its employees might live on the embarrassingly paltry wages that they are paid.(According to the Census Bureau's American Community Survey of 2009-11, median earnings for a fast-food worker were $18,564 a year.) The budget is based on two jobs, which has aroused special ire: Is McDonald's telling its employees to get a second job so they donít have to pay them anything?" http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-07-18/mcdo...
Dang

Lenoir, NC

#41970 Aug 19, 2013
$18,5 a year, isn't that ABOVE the poverty line?
Dang

Lenoir, NC

#41971 Aug 19, 2013
"The McDonald's workforce skews young. The average age of a fast-food worker is almost 30 right now, but thatís because of the recession; in 2000, it was 22. The average McDonald's line worker is not planning to put two kids through college on their salary. Only a minority are trying to support just themselves exclusively on their minimum-wage paycheck; they are living with a spouse or partner who makes at least as much as they do, or with parents or other relatives who make more than minimum wage. Moreover, very few people stay in entry-level minimum-wage jobs for very long (though again, the Great Recession has made this happen more than it used to); those workers eventually get promoted or leave for a more promising job.

Those who donít -- who actually try to support a family on minimum-wage paychecks -- will end up with substantial government support. Theyíll get the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, the Earned Income Tax Credit and, in many places, they will now be eligible for Medicaid.

Is that going to be easy? No. But is it impossible? Also no, which we know because there are millions of people in this country doing it. Keep in mind that most McDonald's workers donít live close to New York City or Washington, the sources of much of the commentary Iíve seen. These are, respectively, the first- and fourth-most-expensive cities in the country. In many areas, the median after-tax household income is not that far from that on the McDonald's worksheet, and itís pretty easy to rent a room in a friendís house for less than $600 a month. Memphis, Tenn., for example, has a median household income of $35,000, which, according to Paycheckcity.com ís take-home calculator, would give a single person about $2,300 a month after taxes. And thatís the median -- 50 percent of the city is below that. You should not develop a theory of household finance that declares that the city of Memphis does not exist."

“Vote Republican”

Since: Aug 08

Wyandanch, NY

#41972 Aug 19, 2013
Splendid Tiger wrote:
<quoted text> You will need a miracle buddy.Ohio State will grind yogi up like stale Cheetos.and spit you out like a bad loogie.Buffalo.What a town, cowering in the shadow of omnipresent NYC.
You are right, I am not a fan of the city, I just went to university there. I am from the NYC area.

OSU has suspended its 7th player. Buffalo only has to loose by less than 28 to make this a moral victory!
TSF

Park Ridge, IL

#41973 Aug 19, 2013
I Hate Syracuse wrote:
<quoted text>Bro, are you expected to be taken seriously? I do not want to be insulting, but are you serious?
But actually I am insane, that's why I'm for Obamacare, my private medical coverage is doing nothing to get rid of these voices in my head.
TSF

Fayetteville, NC

#41974 Aug 19, 2013
Gaston Day looks like a good school as far as NC private schools are concerned. I would say they are a rare exception . They do not offer advanced courses except on line, a distinct disadvantage. They do not list the qualifications of their teachers, which raises questions.
They require exemplary behavior from their students , a good thing. They are not forced to take probationary criminals by the court system like public schools are required to do, another good thing.
Making private schools available to give more choices, a good thing. Defunding public schools ,in an effort to make private schools more competitive, a seriously dishonest and misguided bad thing. The fraud in other states which have done this speaks for itself.

Tuition and Fees for 2013-2014

Pre-School (half day):$4,300

Pre-School (full day):$5,550

Pre-K (half day):$5,000

Pre-K (full day):$6,250

K-4th:$12,725

5th-8th:$13,955

9th-12th:$13,640
State of Denial wrote:
This is a fine private school in Gaston County. They also provide financial aide.
http://www.gastonday.org/welcome
TSF

Park Ridge, IL

#41975 Aug 19, 2013
The voices are back and they keep telling me to kill republikans, kill republikans, kill republikans, kill republikans, kill republikans.....
Boo

Lenoir, NC

#41976 Aug 19, 2013
TSF wrote:
The voices are back and they keep telling me to kill republikans, kill republikans, kill republikans, kill republikans, kill republikans.....
I hope you are a republican!!! it's a starting place.
Psychoticus

Lenoir, NC

#41977 Aug 19, 2013
I Hate Syracuse wrote:
<quoted text>You are right, I am not a fan of the city, I just went to university there. I am from the NYC area.
OSU has suspended its 7th player. Buffalo only has to loose by less than 28 to make this a moral victory!
The South inflicted horrible caualties on the North in the Civil War,despite being hampered by an agrarian economy and an almost total total lack of industry.How`d that work out for them? Ohio State is a breeding ground for NFL players.
Boo

Lenoir, NC

#41978 Aug 19, 2013
Dang wrote:
"The McDonald's workforce skews young. The average age of a fast-food worker is almost 30 right now, but thatís because of the recession; in 2000, it was 22. The average McDonald's line worker is not planning to put two kids through college on their salary. Only a minority are trying to support just themselves exclusively on their minimum-wage paycheck; they are living with a spouse or partner who makes at least as much as they do, or with parents or other relatives who make more than minimum wage. Moreover, very few people stay in entry-level minimum-wage jobs for very long (though again, the Great Recession has made this happen more than it used to); those workers eventually get promoted or leave for a more promising job.
Those who donít -- who actually try to support a family on minimum-wage paychecks -- will end up with substantial government support. Theyíll get the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, the Earned Income Tax Credit and, in many places, they will now be eligible for Medicaid.
Is that going to be easy? No. But is it impossible? Also no, which we know because there are millions of people in this country doing it. Keep in mind that most McDonald's workers donít live close to New York City or Washington, the sources of much of the commentary Iíve seen. These are, respectively, the first- and fourth-most-expensive cities in the country. In many areas, the median after-tax household income is not that far from that on the McDonald's worksheet, and itís pretty easy to rent a room in a friendís house for less than $600 a month. Memphis, Tenn., for example, has a median household income of $35,000, which, according to Paycheckcity.com ís take-home calculator, would give a single person about $2,300 a month after taxes. And thatís the median -- 50 percent of the city is below that. You should not develop a theory of household finance that declares that the city of Memphis does not exist."
Funny how the media and Gov. construe numbers.
Psychoticus

Lenoir, NC

#41979 Aug 19, 2013
NYC.What an overrated dung heap.Pizza is great there though.Much better than the fungus pile pizza they think is so great in Chicago.Chicago sucks even more than NYC.
Lemon Drop Kid

Lenoir, NC

#41980 Aug 19, 2013
When the scummy terrorists ignite their N-bomb,it will most likely be in NYC.Thats unfortunate.Talk about being the center of attention!
Boo

Lenoir, NC

#41981 Aug 19, 2013
TSF wrote:
<quoted text>But actually I am insane, that's why I'm for Obamacare, my private medical coverage is doing nothing to get rid of these voices in my head.
Join the club, I'm insane too, as well as being morbidly obese. I love food and laying behind a computer stuffing my fat ugly face.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Waynesville Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Pathalogical liar living with a family in Sylva (Oct '12) Feb 26 Liarliar 4
time warner cable Feb 23 muchojesse 1
Select Homes Property Management Company (Jul '14) Feb 19 kurtcooksalot16 4
Investigators hope upped reward, tech lead to c... Feb 18 morganton 1
Anybody know Teresa White? Feb 16 Just askin 1
Power from the sun: Investment in solar panels ... Feb 3 karland 1
Nation to honor Trooper Blanton (May '09) Jan '15 Jeanell Likes ACo... 104
Waynesville Dating
Find my Match
More from around the web

Waynesville People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]

NFL Latest News

Updated 2:46 pm PST

Bleacher Report 2:46PM
Panthers Sign TE Olsen to 3-Year Extension
ESPN 3:04 PM
Olsen inks 3-year, $22.5M deal with Panthers
Yahoo! Sports 3:14 PM
Panthers give Greg Olsen 3-year, $22.5M contract extension
CBS Sports 4:38 PM
Greg Olsen signs 3-year extension with Panthers: 4 things to know
NFL 4:47 PM
Ereck Flowers of Miami a possible fit for Carolina Panthers