Breaking News in pike county

Posted in the Waverly Forum

Who

Brooklyn, NY

#1 Sep 17, 2012
New study shows that waist size for pike county residents is larger than IQ number. City suggesting removing mcdonalds and walmart.
rayie

United States

#2 Sep 17, 2012
Oh ur full of shi*.
whatabout

Waverly, OH

#3 Sep 17, 2012
If I want my waist size to be big, that should be my decision, not the cities! There is a lot better things they could be doing with there time.
robert

Logan, OH

#4 Sep 17, 2012
I think that more breaking news would be that there is a deputy on the sheriff's department that has obsessive compulsive disorder!!! How can this happen...how many times would he have to put the handcuffs on and off before making the arrest?
Hillbilly

Jackson, OH

#5 Sep 17, 2012
Ignorance is bliss.
Wakefield Resident

Maywood, IL

#6 Sep 17, 2012
Want breaking news. How about a meth lab bust on Salt Creek Road today. Same place as last time and the same people. Road was blocked off. Fire Dept was there also sheriff, highway patrol, drug task enforcement and alot of others I couldnt identify. Had a big truck up by the trailer filling it up with stuff from in the house trailer. Thats pike county breaking news. Goes to show let them out of jail too soon and they will continue their hobby.
the whole truth

Ashland, KY

#7 Sep 17, 2012
U.S. economy
Here Comes the Big Manufacturing Slowdown
By Matthew Philips on September 17, 2012 Tweet
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Do Tax Breaks Help Manufacturers?A new TV commercial running in the New York region features Robert De Niro lauding the “new” New York State economy to the tune of Jay-Z’s Empire State of Mind. Quick-cut shots of high-tech manufacturing assembly lines, silicon wafers, and spinning wind turbines (among others) accompany De Niro’s voice-over about attracting businesses and creating jobs, lowering tax rates, and spurring innovation. The message is clear: Business and manufacturing in New York State is making a big comeback. It’d be nice if it were true.
For the second straight month, manufacturing activity in the New York region slowed, this time to the lowest level since April 2009, during the worst of the global recession. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s Empire Manufacturing Survey dropped to a minus 10.4 reading in September, nearly double the slowdown from August’s reading of minus 5.85, and five times as bad as the median forecast of the 53 economists surveyed by Bloomberg, which called for a reading of minus 2. The slowdown was broad and deep, from new orders and shipments to employment. All sank more than expected.
This would be less of a problem if it were just a regional slump. But the New York data is clearly part of a much bigger trend. Last week, the Fed reported a sharp contraction in the country’s industrial output, which showed that production from factories, mines, and utilities fell by 1.2 percent last month—the biggest drop since 2009 and also well below expectations. Slowing U.S. exports have pushed the monthly trade deficit in manufactured goods to a record $63.9 billion. After creating 500,000 jobs since 2010, factories are starting to cut workers.
Manufacturing data tend to be a leading indicator for the rest of the economy. The recent weakness is more an indication of future conditions than present ones, meaning the U.S. manufacturing renaissance of the last two years may be about to take an extended breather. An analysis of 27 major industries by the Manufacturers Alliance for Productivity & Innovation predicts that industrial activity in the U.S. is entering a period of sluggish growth that will last until the second half of 2014. MAPI chief economist Daniel Meckstroth expects that industrial production will grow by 4.5 percent in 2012 and only 2.3 percent in 2013, a full percentage point lower than his previous estimate of 3.3 percent.“The big difference right now is that the growth we’ve seen for the last two years, that’s not going to occur much anymore,” says Meckstroth.
What’s frustrating is that industry is primed for a big investment boom. On the whole, manufacturers have high profits, relatively high utilization rates, and bunches of cash. They face ultra-low borrowing costs. Right now, the U.S. manufacturing sector is using 78 percent of its total capacity, compared to a low of 66 percent in June 2009. Even with low growth expected, companies aren’t that far from maxing out what they can produce at current capacity merely to meet a 2 percent increase in production. A lot have plenty of cash on their balance sheets, and with borrowing rates so low, it’s hard to think that the return on investment from a new project wouldn’t be higher than the cost of the money it takes to build it.“The hurdle rate is really low right now,” says Meckstroth
the whole truth

Ashland, KY

#8 Sep 17, 2012
U.S. economy
Here Comes the Big Manufacturing Slowdown
By Matthew Philips on September 17, 2012 Tweet
Facebook
LinkedIn
Google Plus
60 Comments Email
Print
Related
Story
Researcher Unearths Record Manufacturing Trade GapStory
Bloomberg View: A Reality Check on American ManufacturingStory
Worker Shortage? Teach Teens Manufacturing SkillsStory
Small U.S. Manufacturers Give Up on 'Made in China'Blog
Repatriating Jobs: U.S. Manufacturing Gains MomentumStory
An Obama Aide Makes the Case for a Manufacturing BiasStory
Ideas Matter: Obama Adviser Makes the Case for Helping ManufacturingBlog The Manufacturing Myth That Both Parties Cling ToStory
Do Tax Breaks Help Manufacturers?A new TV commercial running in the New York region features Robert De Niro lauding the “new” New York State economy to the tune of Jay-Z’s Empire State of Mind. Quick-cut shots of high-tech manufacturing assembly lines, silicon wafers, and spinning wind turbines (among others) accompany De Niro’s voice-over about attracting businesses and creating jobs, lowering tax rates, and spurring innovation. The message is clear: Business and manufacturing in New York State is making a big comeback. It’d be nice if it were true.
For the second straight month, manufacturing activity in the New York region slowed, this time to the lowest level since April 2009, during the worst of the global recession. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s Empire Manufacturing Survey dropped to a minus 10.4 reading in September, nearly double the slowdown from August’s reading of minus 5.85, and five times as bad as the median forecast of the 53 economists surveyed by Bloomberg, which called for a reading of minus 2. The slowdown was broad and deep, from new orders and shipments to employment. All sank more than expected.
This would be less of a problem if it were just a regional slump. But the New York data is clearly part of a much bigger trend. Last week, the Fed reported a sharp contraction in the country’s industrial output, which showed that production from factories, mines, and utilities fell by 1.2 percent last month—the biggest drop since 2009 and also well below expectations. Slowing U.S. exports have pushed the monthly trade deficit in manufactured goods to a record $63.9 billion. After creating 500,000 jobs since 2010, factories are starting to cut workers.
Manufacturing data tend to be a leading indicator for the rest of the economy. The recent weakness is more an indication of future conditions than present ones, meaning the U.S. manufacturing renaissance of the last two years may be about to take an extended breather. An analysis of 27 major industries by the Manufacturers Alliance for Productivity & Innovation predicts that industrial activity in the U.S. is entering a period of sluggish growth that will last until the second half of 2014. MAPI chief economist Daniel Meckstroth expects that industrial production will grow by 4.5 percent in 2012 and only 2.3 percent in 2013, a full percentage point lower than his previous estimate of 3.3 percent.“The big difference right now is that the growth we’ve seen for the last two years, that’s not going to occur much anymore,” says Meckstroth.
browneyelover

United States

#9 Sep 18, 2012
at least meth keeps waist size small
hair raiser

Heath, OH

#10 Sep 18, 2012
Once again if they the law would give drug test to those on probation for drug test that are mandated by the courts it might help.
jrs

Waverly, OH

#11 Sep 18, 2012
What a retard lets worry about the waist size in pike county and not the opiate and meth epidemic! No lets worry about the fat people because they are getting children hooked on fat and selling fat!
ThePhantom

Waverly, OH

#12 Sep 19, 2012
NEWS FLASH:
This Just in...
One third of the entire county's population is obese and diabetic, one third are just waiting on their unemployment check, and the other third are all hooked on pills and just dont give a damn.
Local officials say they frankly couldnt care less.......
jrs

Waverly, OH

#13 Sep 20, 2012
You must fall under all three!

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