Hope for Berkshire dairy farmers

Hope for Berkshire dairy farmers

There are 63 comments on the Berkshire Eagle story from Aug 6, 2008, titled Hope for Berkshire dairy farmers. In it, Berkshire Eagle reports that:

The dwindling population of dairy farmers in Massachusetts is watching warily to see how new legislation, awaiting the governor's signature, will affect their battered bottom lines.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Berkshire Eagle.

First Prev
of 4
Next Last
Eric

AOL

#1 Aug 6, 2008
Just one more special interest group getting a welfare handout.

Since: May 08

Location hidden

#2 Aug 6, 2008
Eric wrote:
Just one more special interest group getting a welfare handout.
You have NO idea of what you are talking about. Check the facts about farming then make your rude comments!
Eric

AOL

#3 Aug 6, 2008
coopsmama wrote:
<quoted text>
You have NO idea of what you are talking about. Check the facts about farming then make your rude comments!
I grew up on a dairy farm, and my cousin still runs it. I know the business. It isn't viable in the Northeast.

Since: May 08

Location hidden

#4 Aug 6, 2008
how do you figure that? Also I'm sure the Dairy Farmers in Berkshire County would disagree with you.
Eric

AOL

#5 Aug 6, 2008
coopsmama wrote:
how do you figure that? Also I'm sure the Dairy Farmers in Berkshire County would disagree with you.
If a business was viable, it wouldn't need government handouts. And I'm sure Berkshire dairy farmers disagree...the same way pigs with their snout in the trough squeal for more slop.

Since: May 08

Location hidden

#6 Aug 6, 2008
Eric wrote:
<quoted text>If a business was viable, it wouldn't need government handouts. And I'm sure Berkshire dairy farmers disagree...the same way pigs with their snout in the trough squeal for more slop.
Aren't you the same guy that writes the letters to the Editor? Again you have no clue of what you are talking about and I doubt that you where raised on a farm. The farmers I know in Berkshire County are hard working men and women and respectful and take pride in what they do. With the price of grain and fuel going up the farmers barely break even. Check the facts.
Oink

Queensbury, NY

#7 Aug 6, 2008
Eric wrote:
<quoted text>I grew up on a dairy farm, and my cousin still runs it. I know the business. It isn't viable in the Northeast.
I'm sure your cousin is as proud as a peacock, to have a family member claiming that he is "like a pig" and part of a "special interest group" waiting for a handout.
Legal 1

Albany, NY

#8 Aug 6, 2008
One of the surest ways to assist local farmers and insure the freshest product in your pantry, fridge, whatever, is to buy locally produced grocery items.

“What are you looking at?”

Since: Feb 08

Location hidden

#9 Aug 6, 2008
Almost all farming gets some sort of subsidy, in all regions of the US. From tax breaks for the land to grants for crop loss, and price subsidy for market changes.
The alternative is not to have any farming done in the US and be at the mercy of importing all our food.
Even states like California and Wisconsin, the two largest dairy states, they have subsidies that make MA subsidies look like chump change.

Short version:
Almost all commercial farming is eligible for subsidies.
fly on da wall

Alton, NH

#10 Aug 6, 2008
Swinson wrote:
Almost all farming gets some sort of subsidy, in all regions of the US. From tax breaks for the land to grants for crop loss, and price subsidy for market changes.
The alternative is not to have any farming done in the US and be at the mercy of importing all our food.
Even states like California and Wisconsin, the two largest dairy states, they have subsidies that make MA subsidies look like chump change.
Short version:
Almost all commercial farming is eligible for subsidies.
Tariffs, from which the federal government derived the large portion of its revenue prior to the advent of the illegal income tax, were meant to level the playing field between American producers of all sorts and the imports from those countries with (for whatever reason) lower production costs. The tariff on an import would raise its selling price to a level EQUAL TO that of our equivalent item. Then the QUALITY would become the deciding factor for the consumer.

The abolition of tariffs in the name opf anti-protectionism has been one factor leading to our current state of affairs.

Reinstating them would go a long long way toward restoring our manufacturing and agricultural bases.
fly on da wall

Alton, NH

#11 Aug 6, 2008
Legal 1 wrote:
One of the surest ways to assist local farmers and insure the freshest product in your pantry, fridge, whatever, is to buy locally produced grocery items.
BINGO!

“What are you looking at?”

Since: Feb 08

Location hidden

#12 Aug 6, 2008
I do not disagree but we would end up with what we had before, tariff wars. But again the tariffs don't really go to helping with the day to day operations of a farm, nor have they in the past.
A tariff does not "pay for" crops ruined by natural disasters, nor does it help with taxes paid on land.
The problem is many of the input costs of farming are very high, so although a tariff might level the playing field for products inside the country v. those being imported, it does nothing to help defray the input costs.
Lastly, if we put tariffs on imported products that we also export, at some point we will just be cut out of the process and if supply exceeded demand in any given year for say, wheat, it would again ruin the farmers.
Bart

Williamstown, MA

#13 Aug 6, 2008
Eric wrote:
<quoted text>If a business was viable, it wouldn't need government handouts. And I'm sure Berkshire dairy farmers disagree...the same way pigs with their snout in the trough squeal for more slop.
So Eric I guess you are in favor of eliminating subsidies to the big oil companies?
Eric

AOL

#14 Aug 6, 2008
Oink wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm sure your cousin is as proud as a peacock, to have a family member claiming that he is "like a pig" and part of a "special interest group" waiting for a handout.
I know this may come as a surprise, but people can profoundly disagree about somebody and still get along. To be perfectly honest with you, I've said worse things to his face than in here, and he's said worse to me, but we're blood, so it ends there.
Eric

AOL

#15 Aug 6, 2008
Bart wrote:
<quoted text>
So Eric I guess you are in favor of eliminating subsidies to the big oil companies?
Other than subisides which bear directly on the national defense, such as fuel subisidies to airlines to fly heavier than necessary planes in case they eventually have to be used as troop transports, I favor no subsidies for anyone.
fly on da wall

Alton, NH

#16 Aug 6, 2008
Swinson wrote:
I do not disagree but we would end up with what we had before, tariff wars. But again the tariffs don't really go to helping with the day to day operations of a farm, nor have they in the past.
A tariff does not "pay for" crops ruined by natural disasters, nor does it help with taxes paid on land.
The problem is many of the input costs of farming are very high, so although a tariff might level the playing field for products inside the country v. those being imported, it does nothing to help defray the input costs.
Lastly, if we put tariffs on imported products that we also export, at some point we will just be cut out of the process and if supply exceeded demand in any given year for say, wheat, it would again ruin the farmers.
Tariffs do and have worked.

The day--day operations are the farmer's responsibility and ensure that only the efficient will survive.

Natural disasters are the reason farmers purchase crop insurance.

Taxes are a part of the overhead, added to the cost of doing business.

Tariffs have absolutely nothing to do with the above other than to ensure that prices remain competitive.

I'll stop short of ludicrous in describing your last statement which describes a highly improbable scenario in view of the ongoing global food shortages.

One very real problem is companies like Monsanto which are greedily grabbing seed varieties from OUR seed banks and PATENTING THEM. The farmers are then forced to buy seed from them which they are unable to save from their own crops, as in previous years, and must buy seed from the megacorps EVERY YEAR. When you factor in the growth of corporate agribiz gobbling up tillable acreage, an insidious trend becomes obvious.

The very real dangerous trend is the concentration of food resources in the hands of the greedy few and the likely possibility that it will be used as a population control device.
Eric

AOL

#17 Aug 6, 2008
coopsmama wrote:
<quoted text>
Aren't you the same guy that writes the letters to the Editor? Again you have no clue of what you are talking about and I doubt that you where raised on a farm. The farmers I know in Berkshire County are hard working men and women and respectful and take pride in what they do. With the price of grain and fuel going up the farmers barely break even. Check the facts.
So you tell me, what is so respectable about, or to be proud of, in getting government handouts?
Bart

Williamstown, MA

#18 Aug 6, 2008
Eric wrote:
<quoted text>So you tell me, what is so respectable about, or to be proud of, in getting government handouts?
In this case the two are unrelated. In your first few posts you gave the impression that you felt farmers were a lazy lot and would prefer to sit back and collect welfare than earn a profit.

The subsidies on the other hand are there for farmers who having chosen to live a respectful life (to that of the land, animal, crop, and community) are still unable to make a living. The land they protect from the agri-business you oppose, as well as the condo developer, is in jeopardy. The subsidies are a way to help the farmer help the community. They are post production, not pre-production.

The first redeeming post I have read from you - you oppose subsidies to big oil.
Eric

AOL

#19 Aug 6, 2008
Bart wrote:
<quoted text> In this case the two are unrelated. In your first few posts you gave the impression that you felt farmers were a lazy lot and would prefer to sit back and collect welfare than earn a profit.
The subsidies on the other hand are there for farmers who having chosen to live a respectful life (to that of the land, animal, crop, and community) are still unable to make a living. The land they protect from the agri-business you oppose, as well as the condo developer, is in jeopardy. The subsidies are a way to help the farmer help the community. They are post production, not pre-production.
The first redeeming post I have read from you - you oppose subsidies to big oil.
I never said lazy, but stick to the word I did use, welfare. My point is people should pull their own weight, and not get government subsidies when the going gets tough.
Bart

Williamstown, MA

#20 Aug 6, 2008
Eric wrote:
<quoted text>I never said lazy, but stick to the word I did use, welfare. My point is people should pull their own weight, and not get government subsidies when the going gets tough.
I didn't say you said lazy, I said you gave the impression that that was your opinion.

I understand your point, but I think you are missing the bigger picture. Though the farmer receives the actual subsidy, it is the community as a whole that benefits.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 4
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Warren Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Warren asks Trump to withdraw AG nominee or fac... Feb '17 davy 86
News W. Brookfield man spends wedding night in jail (Aug '06) Aug '16 Dave Jersey 9
News Tantasqua Regional High School students charged... (Jun '12) Aug '16 Mike Jersey 4
News Pregnant Mom Arrested For OUI, Drug Possession (Oct '06) Jul '16 Mike Jersey 3
Dan Kirouac returns to Ware for acoustic concert (Jun '16) Jun '16 New England Music... 1
Dan Kirouac performs live in Ware (May '16) May '16 New England Music... 1
cousin Brian chaffee (Dec '15) Dec '15 Mike Jersey 1

Warren Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

Warren Mortgages