Ho'opili project doesn't fit Hawaii's...

Ho'opili project doesn't fit Hawaii's renewed focus on a sustai...

There are 37 comments on the Honolulu Star-Bulletin story from Sep 3, 2009, titled Ho'opili project doesn't fit Hawaii's renewed focus on a sustai.... In it, Honolulu Star-Bulletin reports that:

People seem to either love the Ho'opili development, or hate it. And I can understand that.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Honolulu Star-Bulletin.

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yep

San Diego, CA

#1 Sep 3, 2009
thanks for stepping up to the plate and letting your views known Representative Lee --- you are certainly breaking from the mold of the typical politician

most probably don't have clue where their representives stand --- guess everyone will need to call them today and report back here

if they don't have a straight answer, then at least everyon will know they don't stand anywhere on this issue

then the people can start voting informatively
Flexo

Kula, HI

#3 Sep 3, 2009
Self sustaining as we know it today is a joke. Locally grown produce is very, very expensive which is why we import so much. That same land that is so valuable for real estate development drives the cost of leasing the land to the farmers. The owners want the property to yield the most profits possible. And with limited lands available for either farming or real estate, the cost is always going to be high.
That being said, we still don't need this project, not with another 30 to 40,000 homes already approved and scheduled for construction in the area.
Von

Aiea, HI

#4 Sep 3, 2009
The issue has to do with jobs more than anything. I may not agree with the project, but there are so many people that desperate need jobs so what can you do? In the good times you would see a lot more opposition to this project, but now days the jobs are more important than anything.

Affording to buy a new house, well that is another story? There are many houses in Ewa Beach just setting there because the mortgage is way too high and the owners ran away to live with mom. So why build new houses if that is the case? It does not make any sense, but like I said this has more to do with jobs than anything. Never mind if you cannot afford it or not because that is not the issue.
Stumpy

Honolulu, HI

#5 Sep 3, 2009
Just concrete the entire island and build warehouses already, and stuff the people into them. That's the goal of the developers and polititians.
Islandboi

Fort Huachuca, AZ

#6 Sep 3, 2009
Schulers Hula Hoop slum housing project is the last thing the Nei needs. More cookie cutter homes, jammed together, no trees, no parking, high energy bills due to no trees, zero clearance lots, more traffic, on and on. All Schuler wants to do is stick it to the buyer and take their money back to Texas. Do right and tell Schuler to take a hike back to Texas, we do not need them on island. The land is fine just as it is, open space we desperately need.
somecommonsense

Waianae, HI

#7 Sep 3, 2009
Thank you for siding with the people who wish to stop this development. I think all the ag land that is left should be preserved. Once it is gone there is no turning back. Density in town makes much more sense and would stop overloading our freeways!

Ag land contributes to our food, jobs, and the beauty of this island.
Babes

Wahiawa, HI

#8 Sep 3, 2009
The time has come for developers to be allowed to build up, not out, to preserve land space. In the second city area, there should be no reason why residential building complexes shouldn't be constructed at maybe 10 floors maximum? We don't necessarily have to build more ugly single family homes and we don't necessary have to build more homes to buy. Many of our baby boomers prefer or will prefer to live in nice apartment complexes at affordable rental prices, too. And young people just starting out would fare much better as well. Why does it have to be all or nothing?
bluemoki

Seattle, WA

#9 Sep 3, 2009
I am seriously concerned that Schuler will play hardball and kick Aloun Farms off the land when their lease runs out in the next few years. They are not obligated to renew the lease. Once the farm is out of the picture, it will be much easier to convince the Land Use board that they may as well turn it into houses. Mark my words, Schuler is not stupid! This land should be bought back by the State and put into a permanent farmland reserve, otherwise it will get paved over sooner or later.
waimea jim

United States

#10 Sep 3, 2009
So, Mr. Lee, where do you stand on the proposed use of this land, all I see is more rhetoric from a politician?
Why don't you propose somewhere else to build, like the preservation land at the former Alan Davis property, or is it because they don't want more houses in Hawaii Kai? All they are growing there are weeds and boulders.
All the proposed developments are along the existing freeways and proposed rail routes. How about houses on the old Waialua Sugar plantation lands, are they prime ag lands too? Or, is it just too far from the freeways?
Honolulu should have a moratorium on all development of all former agricultural lands, until the State comes up with a revised plan for development.
does

Wahiawa, HI

#11 Sep 3, 2009
Does Chris Lee want to represent us here on the west-side? We need forward thinkers like him!!!
waimea jim

United States

#12 Sep 3, 2009
Babes wrote:
The time has come for developers to be allowed to build up, not out, to preserve land space. In the second city area, there should be no reason why residential building complexes shouldn't be constructed at maybe 10 floors maximum? We don't necessarily have to build more ugly single family homes and we don't necessary have to build more homes to buy. Many of our baby boomers prefer or will prefer to live in nice apartment complexes at affordable rental prices, too. And young people just starting out would fare much better as well. Why does it have to be all or nothing?
The problem with development is that the REALTORS go in and speculate on the properties without ever having the intention of living in the house / condominium. The go in, buy the house / condo then sell it before it is completed. What needs to be done is, they need to sell warrants to buy the house with the stipulation that you actually live in the home for 10 years. These warrants also would require that take physical possesion of the property, and not be able to sell them before they are completed(like in the Trump Condominium).
There needs to be a shift of priorities on housing from speculators to homeowners.
Fuzzy Ball

Honolulu, HI

#13 Sep 3, 2009
A local study done last year determined that with 1000 acres in a modern organic technique the whole island of Kauai could be kept sustainably in produce. Their base pop is 50k. 10-12k acres of land could support a lot of O'ahu. If not all here, grow it on the neighbor islands. Time for vision, cooperation, preserve the land and thrive locally. Mahalo for the article.
CWD

Hilo, HI

#14 Sep 3, 2009
No - we need him to stay here in Windward O`ahu!

Seriously, there is a huge need for people to run for office who will be around twenty years from now to live with the impacts of their decisions today.

We also need elected officials who can think beyond the boundaries of their district - or their island or even the state.

Having done major research on this issue, let me share with you just one very important fact that is truly scary: The City & County of Honolulu iz making its planning decisions for all sorts of infrastructure needs - transportation, solid waste, utilities including potable water - on a 50% population increase to 1.4 million residents plus another 60,000 military personnel and an average visitor count of 60,000 per day - in 20 years.

We need more Chris Lees in charge of the decision-making instead of a bunch of ageing bureaucrats who will not have to live with the day-2-impacts in 2030 of what is being decided in 2010. They may still be alive, but they won't have to drive long distances to work, put up with crumbling schools for their children, and deal with over-used and under-maintained beaches & parks.
waimea jim

United States

#15 Sep 3, 2009
yep wrote:
thanks for stepping up to the plate and letting your views known Representative Lee --- you are certainly breaking from the mold of the typical politician
most probably don't have clue where their representives stand --- guess everyone will need to call them today and report back here
if they don't have a straight answer, then at least everyon will know they don't stand anywhere on this issue then the people can start voting informatively
Are you kidding, this is just a politician talking out of two sides of his mouth, no stand was taken. No proposals, no solutions, just telling you the two sides of the issue. All of the politicians need to get some cajones, and tell us straight out that they hate the proposal or love it.
alice

Kahului, HI

#16 Sep 3, 2009
good point
KLMK

Honolulu, HI

#17 Sep 3, 2009
Ho`opili will be the best planned, most sustainable community in the state. I hope it will stand as an example of how future communities in Hawai`i should function.
Curious

Silver Spring, MD

#18 Sep 3, 2009
I have followed this discussion without having formed an opinion yet on whether development of Ho'opili is a good thing or a bad thing. I see merits on both sides of the argument. But one of the discussions that has not been raised (or maybe I've missed it) is the economic feasibility of farming. The State can preserve this land for ag uses but will anyone actually farm it? Does it make economic sense for someone - an individual or a corporate entity - to actually farm it and be able to make a living at it?

Just a thought.
Babes

Wahiawa, HI

#19 Sep 4, 2009
waimea jim wrote:
<quoted text>The problem with development is that the REALTORS go in and speculate on the properties without ever having the intention of living in the house / condominium. The go in, buy the house / condo then sell it before it is completed. What needs to be done is, they need to sell warrants to buy the house with the stipulation that you actually live in the home for 10 years. These warrants also would require that take physical possesion of the property, and not be able to sell them before they are completed(like in the Trump Condominium).
There needs to be a shift of priorities on housing from speculators to homeowners.
Not every resident can or wants to be a homeowner. Many still want or have to rent. I have no problem with investors of any kind buying property but there should be a premium for investors in the way of mortgages and property taxes. There should also be higher interests and taxes for foreign investors.
Babes

Wahiawa, HI

#20 Sep 4, 2009
Curious wrote:
I have followed this discussion without having formed an opinion yet on whether development of Ho'opili is a good thing or a bad thing. I see merits on both sides of the argument. But one of the discussions that has not been raised (or maybe I've missed it) is the economic feasibility of farming. The State can preserve this land for ag uses but will anyone actually farm it? Does it make economic sense for someone - an individual or a corporate entity - to actually farm it and be able to make a living at it?
Just a thought.
We are eating the fruits of the farms even now. Soil scientists have said that the soil on the ewa plains is the richest in the world. Why make the farmers move so the developer can pour concrete slabs on it for more ugly homes people can ill afford?
nimby

Waianae, HI

#21 Sep 5, 2009
Babes wrote:
<quoted text>
We are eating the fruits of the farms even now. Soil scientists have said that the soil on the ewa plains is the richest in the world. Why make the farmers move so the developer can pour concrete slabs on it for more ugly homes people can ill afford?
Who are these expert's? Where is the data to back them up?

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