House collapses into rushing Kaipapau...

House collapses into rushing Kaipapau Stream - Hawaii News

There are 38 comments on the Honolulu Star-Bulletin story from Nov 15, 2009, titled House collapses into rushing Kaipapau Stream - Hawaii News. In it, Honolulu Star-Bulletin reports that:

Hauula resident Shon Kaanaana still locks the door to his house, which is now just a kitchen hanging over the rushing Kaipapau Stream.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Honolulu Star-Bulletin.

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enufalready

Honolulu, HI

#1 Nov 15, 2009
Have to wonder at the initial decision to build any structure right on the earthen bank of a waterway that is prone to flooding; it's like building homes with wooden shingles and shakes in fire prone regions, or homes on oceanfront sand dunes in hurricane zones. The owners of homes that are destroyed by the natural events that their decision to build foolishly defied cannot expect others to foot the bill or accept responsibility when the inevitable occurs.
Da kine

Union City, NJ

#2 Nov 15, 2009
So long ago dos dirty rats politicians knew of "worst" areas in hawaii and,did "Cero" to help.Me,myself and I attitude is what rules in their minds people do not expect help from them unless you vote again and give them money for their toilet paper.Wake up Hawaii and see taht dis dirty rats do not do what their said.WAKE UP!!!!
Pelelike

Paso Robles, CA

#3 Nov 15, 2009
Start stockpiling foods and da like. Planet X is inbound and the same as in Noahs day will happen again. Our Government knows its coming and is hiding it. They are stockpiling food in their underground tunnels and cities that they have built for 40 years. They have enough food and supplies for 1.3 million people for 2 years. The weather will get worse. Feb is rain month and this is only nov.
Do your homework. Look up "Nibiru".
grunt

Mililani, HI

#4 Nov 15, 2009
enufalready wrote:
Have to wonder at the initial decision to build any structure right on the earthen bank of a waterway that is prone to flooding; it's like building homes with wooden shingles and shakes in fire prone regions, or homes on oceanfront sand dunes in hurricane zones. The owners of homes that are destroyed by the natural events that their decision to build foolishly defied cannot expect others to foot the bill or accept responsibility when the inevitable occurs.
Although I feel terrible about Mr. Kaanaana's loss of property I agree with your assessment of the situation. I would like a clarification about who owns the stream. There must be a lot of owners of that stream??
Hula Girl

Chicago Ridge, IL

#5 Nov 15, 2009
enufalready wrote:
Have to wonder at the initial decision to build any structure right on the earthen bank of a waterway that is prone to flooding; it's like building homes with wooden shingles and shakes in fire prone regions, or homes on oceanfront sand dunes in hurricane zones. The owners of homes that are destroyed by the natural events that their decision to build foolishly defied cannot expect others to foot the bill or accept responsibility when the inevitable occurs.
Exactly! If I were going to build or buy a house or condo, it would NOT be next to a stream, especially on the wet windward side. It would also not be up next to the mountains or hills - too many cases of bolders crashing into houses in wet weather when the ground gets saturatead with water and the boulders come loose. And I would not live in or buy a structure right on the street on a busy street or intersection - there have been too many cases of drivers losing control of their cars (either drunk or they fall asleep a the wheel) and they crash into the structure.
My friend's sister's father in law was killed because a drunk driver lost control of his car and crashed into their house; he crashed into one of bedrooms, which was on the front of the house. The father in law was sleeping in the bed and the car landed on top of him, killing him.
Mike

United States

#6 Nov 15, 2009
Do boat houses pay higher property taxes? Ask Mufi.com
foot in mouth

Hauula, HI

#7 Nov 15, 2009
enufalready wrote:
Have to wonder at the initial decision to build any structure right on the earthen bank of a waterway that is prone to flooding; it's like building homes with wooden shingles and shakes in fire prone regions, or homes on oceanfront sand dunes in hurricane zones. The owners of homes that are destroyed by the natural events that their decision to build foolishly defied cannot expect others to foot the bill or accept responsibility when the inevitable occurs.
You idiot. There was a retaining wall there, before all this happened. This predicament was brought to the attention of the city, state and DLNR years ago, that the intergity of the wall had deminished. No one stepped foward to take responsibility.
Now you come into the picture telling how foolish these people were for building on earthen river bank. Give me a break.

Since: Oct 08

Honolulu, HI

#8 Nov 15, 2009
From what I read, this guy made efforts to have things be safe, and somebody else didn't come through. And to those who say he shouldn't have built, or should move, maybe he inherited the land, and is not rich like some of you others lucky enough to have the kind of money to relocate when you feel like it. The bottom line it seems to me is that the party or parties responsible for maintaining that stream didn't do their job, this guy's home was destroyed, and it was preventable. I hope this guy retains Seitz or someone like that and pursues this through the courts.
James Kanahele

Kapaa, HI

#9 Nov 15, 2009
and these are the same city and state bozos who are expected to successfully design, construct, and operate a multi-billion dollar rail transit system?

i don't think so.
alice

United States

#10 Nov 15, 2009
another mufi fiasco
satch7

Aiea, HI

#11 Nov 15, 2009
There is NO EXCUSE for Kaanaana's house collapsing as both state and city workers were forewarned but typical white collar pencil pushing bureaucrats blaming each other for being responsible in ensuring the safety of the area around the dwelling. This just makes me sick! I hope the Kaanaana family can hire a civil lawyer and sue the state or city or both for their incompetence. My goodness, we're talking about a person's home and these bureaucrats cannot take it upon themselves to direct a shoring up of the embankment so a disaster like this couldn't happen. I am just disgusted with these state 'n city bureaucrats and I do hope they are eventually laid off as WE DON'T NEED THESE PENCIL PUSHERS who just bloat our state bureaucracy with incompetents. My sympathy and heart goes out to the Kaanaana family.
alice

United States

#12 Nov 15, 2009
city has deterorated under mufi
Tahoe Joe

Gresham, OR

#13 Nov 15, 2009
The City/County Gov't. says it's a "private Stream" and they can't do anything...Hey Bruddah's and Sister's, you supposed to be da "public-servants".
How'z about you get off your okole's and get out there and help this poor bruddah.

What, "No Can Help"?

Fooey.

Do Sumpin.

You politicians and bureaucrats ought to be ashamed of yourselves.

Real simple...The stream affects the bridge and the highway, both public improvements you are duty bound to protect.

Mitigating the stream flow to protect the "public" improvements could have saved this bruddah's home.

Shame, shame, shame.

The fools that made and supported the decisions not to help here need to go.

Politicians and bureaucrats who can't figure out a simple way to help people and sit wringing their hands saying "No Can Help" ALL need to go.

No Aloha here.

Shame, shame, shame.
Not like you had no idea either.
All this jump up quick and surprise everybuddy, it be understandable.

To sit on your hands weeks, months, or years wayyy stupid.

Go Quit now.

Shame.
Lifes Lessons

Kaneohe, HI

#15 Nov 15, 2009
Lesson #1, do not buy a house so close to a stream.
Hawaii5-0

Burbank, IL

#16 Nov 15, 2009
So much adversity to this family. Like one of you recent comments, this could've been inherited land or this could've been the only house these Hawaiians could afford. I know if it was up to them, they probably wouldn't have wanted a house on the banks of a stream but in a more safe location. It all comes down to money and politics again. Like was said earlier, the family probably couldn't afford living in a place of their choice like the filthy rich do. When it comes to politics, we know we're in a losing battle with those clowns that sit on their okole and get paid for their "Title". It's so sad to see this State which is suppose to be the Aloha State with lack of Aloha to it's own people, indigenous or not. If I were one of those people who has a million zeros after the number, I would certainly help people in need and try to come up with a solution that would help them immediately but I'm not. I'm just a normal person who after 27 years have been laid of because of the system of this country where the rich take all. Some of these people have umteen of money for many lifetimes and istead of helping, they just want to hoard it all. I was going to say, they'll get their do but it seems they always come out on top. Again a no win situation. Anyway, my heart goes out to the family but I'm glad the sister had insurance. Hey! State, City and County get off your elemu and do something. Aloha, ahui hou a pau......
Former Maui Resident

San Diego, CA

#17 Nov 15, 2009
foot in mouth wrote:
<quoted text>
You idiot. There was a retaining wall there, before all this happened. This predicament was brought to the attention of the city, state and DLNR years ago, that the intergity of the wall had deminished. No one stepped foward to take responsibility.
Now you come into the picture telling how foolish these people were for building on earthen river bank. Give me a break.
Natural streams are not stable. Their course changes over time, whether or not retaining walls are in place. Anyone building close to a stream or river (i.e., in the flood plain) is at eventual risk of losing their home / lives. Have you ever heard of a 100-year flood? That said, it sounds as if the 'natural' stream was being blocked due to a lack of maintenance / man's construction (bridges, retaining walls, etc. P.S. I studied the fluvial morphology of a major river in California, and watched in one storm event, a major portion of orchard and housing go down the river.
local boy

United States

#18 Nov 15, 2009
alice wrote:
poor hawaiian monkey lost his grass shack home....time to make room for him at the honolulu zoo
Your not very nice! You sound like a gorilla and probably live at the honolulu zoo. If you are trying to be funny your not. What goes around comes around.
TheShaft

Kihei, HI

#19 Nov 15, 2009
I don't understand. If the stream is privately owned, isn't the owner of the stream then responsible to keep it cleared of debris and not the Stat?
Roids

Kapaa, HI

#20 Nov 15, 2009
"Glenn Christensen, a retired postal worker who lives across the street from Kaanaana, said he's been waiting for five years after the state told him it was going to take over his house to widen Kaipapau Bridge. The project is scheduled to start next year."

It appears the homes in the area were already condemned through the power of emminent domain to make the stream wider.

Once the foundation started to be eroded, Kaanaana's residense should have been condemned and the electricity turned off.

I wonder if that has been done yet? The article appears incomplete.
Kahukuan

Las Vegas, NV

#21 Nov 15, 2009
Everyone should know by now how s l o w w w the state elected and appointed officials work by now...it's no surprise to get anything done in a timely manner by the state or city..lot of red tape and wasted time in trying to find out is responsible..city or state.
Example: After fast-moving floodwaters rushed into some 120 Manoa homes and the University of Hawaii campus on October 20, 2004, causing more than $85 million in damage, the state did kick off a project to increase water capacity and improve flow under Woodlawn Bridge.
The project is the first in what is expected to be a series of major flood-mitigation efforts for Manoa Stream over the next two decades.
But residents won't see changes over-night.
Though the design phase of the Woodlawn Bridge project started on December 2007, construction won't begin until December 2009 because of required federal approvals and environmental reviews. The project is expected to wrap up by late 2010.
Residents are frustrated by the pace of work but relieved officials are finally doing something.
It's not just the bridge...It's Manoa stream all the way up to the mountains.
the Manoa flood of 2004 was spurred by a combination of unusually heavy rains and debris-laden streambeds.
Will the state help Hauula? Who knows..maybe five years from now...with new elected and appointed officials..

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