Program hopes to motivate freshmen to...

Program hopes to motivate freshmen to excel - Hawaii News

There are 12 comments on the Honolulu Star-Bulletin story from Aug 27, 2009, titled Program hopes to motivate freshmen to excel - Hawaii News. In it, Honolulu Star-Bulletin reports that:

Hawaii's public schools announced a new Step Up diploma initiative yesterday to encourage freshmen in the Class of 2013 to take more rigorous classes to better prepare them for college and the work force.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Honolulu Star-Bulletin.

high school senior

Mililani, HI

#1 Aug 27, 2009
nope. this does nothing for the freshmen and stresses out the seniors who are guinea pigs for the senior project.
Public Education Skeptic

Kailua Kona, HI

#2 Aug 27, 2009
Once again, here's a program to benefit the top 1% of kids. When is the DOE going to realize that the large percentage of kids are being left behind and many in the public school system believe that those numbers will grow. Soon we will see a large percentage of drop-outs. Fundamental skills are lacking from elementary school on up to middle school. Increasing requirements just "leave more kids behind". This is not a "No Child Left Behind" initiative, it does exactly the opposite. Once again, DOE has it's priorities mixed up.
quebert

Haubstadt, IN

#3 Aug 27, 2009
Simple, 4 years mathmatics, including intermediate Algebra, required, grades in geo, A1, A2, set up for whether higher math or remedial math is needed prior to graduation. Next, 4 years English, with stress on orthography, reading, and composition. Final year to have options of literature or other types of writing, dramatic, American lit, English Lit, ESL. 4 years history, government and civics classes, including how to write/word legislation and at least one semester each on the following: The foundational documents of the government, Compacts, Articles, Declaration, Constitution, Bill of Rights, Amendments. One semester on due process of law, civil and criminal prodcedures and the rights of victims and accused. One semester on electoral process, political parties, elections, and public office. But we'll never see these types of classes, as your children would grow up to put the current crop of politicians against a wall and shoot them.
lookie here

Honolulu, HI

#4 Aug 27, 2009
Public Education Skeptic wrote:
Once again, here's a program to benefit the top 1% of kids. When is the DOE going to realize that the large percentage of kids are being left behind and many in the public school system believe that those numbers will grow. Soon we will see a large percentage of drop-outs. Fundamental skills are lacking from elementary school on up to middle school. Increasing requirements just "leave more kids behind". This is not a "No Child Left Behind" initiative, it does exactly the opposite. Once again, DOE has it's priorities mixed up.
So you would prefer to leave behind the smarter students so the DOE can focus more energies on the lesser students?

The smart students deserve access to FAPE (Free and Appropriate Public Education) as much as the dumber students.

Currently, all NCLB does is leave behind the smartest and the dumbest students, and focus energies on the tipping point students, so that schools may pass the Hawaii State Assessment.

Anything that helps the top students succeed and provices them opportunities that are otherwise being denied so funding can be spend on the lesser students should be considered.

Since: Feb 08

Kaneohe, Hawaii

#5 Aug 27, 2009
Public Education Skeptic wrote:
Once again, here's a program to benefit the top 1% of kids. When is the DOE going to realize that the large percentage of kids are being left behind and many in the public school system believe that those numbers will grow. Soon we will see a large percentage of drop-outs. Fundamental skills are lacking from elementary school on up to middle school. Increasing requirements just "leave more kids behind". This is not a "No Child Left Behind" initiative, it does exactly the opposite. Once again, DOE has it's priorities mixed up.
As an alumna of an elite East Coast school, I see many high school applicants who want to follow in my footsteps.

When I ask public school seniors about the classes that they have taken in high school, many of these bright students bemoan the lack of challenge in the curriculum. Frankly, compared to the private school applicants, they come across as woefully unprepared with a lackluster transcript. Consequently, they are not admitted to my school (and, I imagine other schools) to the degree that the private school kids are admitted.

The upper 1% are at that level because they have worked for it. They are the leaders of tomorrow. The resources have already been pulled from these kids--the ones who have the greatest chance of making a difference in the future. These are the kids who will make the medical breakthroughs, write the insightful prose, and design the bridges of tomorrow. That we would throw them to the wind is a travesty and a blueprint for a darker future.
Parent

Honolulu, HI

#6 Aug 27, 2009
The issue of a "stepped up" degree just to get into college underlies the fundemental problem that students are falling farther behind in the level of academics needed to succeed. No "new" degree will solve the problem, in fact it may alienate the majority of students who are falling two grade levels behind. Mastery of the subject matter not adding on new requirements is needed to succeed.
Its over

Hilo, HI

#7 Aug 27, 2009
OH WOW!!!! Imagine that!!! The DOE will now be offering classes designed to help kids get into college??? The DOE will now be doing something to "motivate" Freshman to succeed??

If the DOE is only doing this now, WHAT THE HELL HAS IT BEEN DOING DOING FOR THE PAST 30 years??????

To me, this is tantamount to the DOE issuing a press release saying, "Hey, everybody, guess what??? We're gonna try to educate kids this year. Pat us on the back. We're so great."
Lefty

Waipahu, HI

#8 Aug 27, 2009
OK, kids. Here's your ticket to a successful future. Whining about injustices done a hundred years ago and playing the perpetual victim will lead you nowhere, and definitely won't put food on the table or a roof over your head. Education is the key. Who is going to step up and take advantage of this and who is not?
Really

Los Angeles, CA

#9 Aug 27, 2009
The state thinks this plan will actually work? Where is adjustments that should be made at lower grade levels where the foundations of learning are built?
Challenging courses? At public schools, in Advance Placement classes, the teachers have to teach to the slowest learner. That causes major problems right there for various reasons. The article also said that joining the program will help with receiving jobs in the future...what kind of jobs??? State jobs??? what a joke. The DOE needs to rebuild from the bottom up. I think public school students need to get out of the state of Hawaii and go to mainland colleges, then bring back what they learn to Hawaii to improve the state.

Since: Jul 09

Honolulu, HI

#10 Aug 27, 2009
high school senior wrote:
nope. this does nothing for the freshmen and stresses out the seniors who are guinea pigs for the senior project.
Poor baby. So stressful being expected to behave like an adult. Wait until you are in your 20's living with your parents because you can't get a job (let alone get admitted to college). But wait - that's stressful for THEM, not you, right?

Since: Jul 09

Honolulu, HI

#11 Aug 28, 2009
To: "Public Education Skeptic" who says: "Once again, here's a program to benefit the top 1% of kids."

That is exactly the point. The "top 1% of kids" (and I doubt the percentage you quote) in
Hawaii have skills similar to the top 25% elsewhere in the U.S.(probably the top 45% or more globally). I have taught in several countries outside the U.S., and know this to be true.

Do you think the solution is to dumb education down? These kids are NOT stupid - they are not being challenged enough. If we train them for manual labor jobs that no longer exist (and never will again) we cheat them out of their future.
Reader

Kahului, HI

#12 Aug 28, 2009
Mr. Gima,

You made a mistake in the Requirements box. 0.5 credits, NOT 5 credits, of expository writing are required.

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