Small bid for digital classroom blossoms

Parents and educators in the modest Beach Park school district had tired of watching the latest technology pass them by. Full Story
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A Grandma

AOL

#1 Nov 30, 2007
I hope this proliferation of computers etc does not totally deprive this generation and maybe those to come the pleasure of working on paper. The joy of producing eraser-free work, watching handwriting improve, the smell of new books and the pleasure of reading them are never forgotten. And the accomplishment of being able to do simple mathematics without all the little gadgets may someday be a necessity. Just think, the children won't be bored when the electricity goes out and there isn't a battery in the house if they can read a book by turning pages instead of pushing a button. They will find a lot of good board games that depend on brain power. Simple math will come in handy too.( And they might become courteous and kind to their friends and parents without all those nasty kids on TV giving them ideas.)
TOM SLICK

Chicago, IL

#2 Nov 30, 2007
See, if the chicago public schools would charge 100 dollars a year for each child, they would not be in the position there in. I'm sorry, they would probably waste that money to.
An Educator

Springfield, IL

#3 Nov 30, 2007
The world is evolving. Technology is here to stay and will only increase.

I still pick up a good book to read during my leisure time, but I also enjoy shopping on-line via my laptop. I enjoy downloading music from itunes.

One cannot do certain mathematics without the background knowledge. Just because they have a calculator doesn't mean they'll be able to solve the problem.

This is a wonderful opportunity for this school. Don't rain on their parade.
TrekkieTechie

Jacksonville, NC

#4 Nov 30, 2007
I love this story and congratulate the parents and local gov't for having that level of trust and cooperation (we all know it's rare these days).

Everything in moderation.
Don't freak-out because everyday technology is making it's way into the classroom. That's a good thing. Keep in mind that those children whose families cannot afford to have that level of technology in the home will now become exposed to it in school; and will not be socially handicapped as they might have otherwise become.

The "biggie problem: is yet to come, when they eventually try to replace actual classrooms with virtual classrooms altogether. I hope it doesn't happen in my lifetime. When that happens, our entire society will be in a downward spiral.
TOM SLICK

Chicago, IL

#5 Nov 30, 2007
A Grandma wrote:
I hope this proliferation of computers etc does not totally deprive this generation and maybe those to come the pleasure of working on paper. The joy of producing eraser-free work, watching handwriting improve, the smell of new books and the pleasure of reading them are never forgotten. And the accomplishment of being able to do simple mathematics without all the little gadgets may someday be a necessity. Just think, the children won't be bored when the electricity goes out and there isn't a battery in the house if they can read a book by turning pages instead of pushing a button. They will find a lot of good board games that depend on brain power. Simple math will come in handy too.( And they might become courteous and kind to their friends and parents without all those nasty kids on TV giving them ideas.)
Good point.
Deborah Bukovy

Chicago, IL

#6 Nov 30, 2007
We thought the story was very interesting but we'd like to point out that St. Matthias Transfiguration School in Chicago has been on this track for years.
eagle mom

Niles, IL

#7 Nov 30, 2007
Kudos to those dedicated parents, school staff and the community for getting the students what they need to succeed!
Shame on the governor & the state of IL for letting it get to the point where already over-taxed parents and communities are forced to fund raise to get the basics that the state should be providing to our schools!
Scotty G

Minneapolis, MN

#8 Nov 30, 2007
I totally agree with what David Morris. He is spot on in his comments!
Cathy

United States

#10 Nov 30, 2007
TOM SLICK wrote:
See, if the chicago public schools would charge 100 dollars a year for each child, they would not be in the position there in. I'm sorry, they would probably waste that money to.
A little negative about Chicago Public Schools... with or without the 100 dollars per child, they will hopefully know the difference between "there" and "they're" and the difference between "to" and "too".
TOM SLICK

Chicago, IL

#12 Nov 30, 2007
Cathy wrote:
<quoted text>
A little negative about Chicago Public Schools... with or without the 100 dollars per child, they will hopefully know the difference between "there" and "they're" and the difference between "to" and "too".
Thanks for correcting me. I see you had no comment for the article, so that say's quite a bit about you. Being 50 and professional, I'm entitled to error every now and then.
Concerned

Downers Grove, IL

#13 Nov 30, 2007
To be able to provide a chid's teacher with the resources and tools needed to enhance lessons and learning is tremendous. To be able to do this with technology is even more tremendous. This is the future whether we like it or not. Education needs to move forward and prepare our students to become well rounded citizens with knowledge that goes beyond the towns they live in. Those that are against providing our students with technology and ways to learn are usually those that are scared of it themselves. Great job to the whole school district and community for providing your children and your children's teachers with resources to enhance and stimulate learning!!!
Layton Olson

Chicago, IL

#14 Nov 30, 2007
Interesting to see public investment yields 5 times in outpouring of support from parents and civic engagement parties, and how schools now wired to use Instructional Support distance learning tools at high speeds for flexible classroom projection and individual student project participation.

Great to see use of TV and handheld tools in which youth today have "second nature" skills, building on many schools and teacher training locations around the state using "laptop immersion" and similar programs.

Great illustration of what Governor of Georgia has said "broadband is today's dialtone." Gov. Blagoyevich's Broadband Deployment Council chaired by Lt. Gov. Quinn supports such Gigabyte-goals for the whole state. For example, Illinois Century Network's telecommunication network for schools, libraries, hospitals and community centers recently increased its speeds beyond home DSL and Cable connections, as needed for everyday uses today.

Keep up the coverage,
Layton Olson
Law firm Howe & Hutton, Ltd.
Digital Education Project and
Governor's Broadband Deployment Council

Looking forward
Nancy B

Skokie, IL

#15 Nov 30, 2007
To Grandma: Interesting how you responded to the article -via the Internet and not by the Pony Express. Some points you may not have considered: technology is the future and if those students are not prepared they will be left behind; differentiated classrooms are where education is right now. With just a click of the button the children can experience other countries, cultures, books and resources that they may never have had the chance to explore; Due to funding some schools don't even have books that they need. The idea is not just about technology but about people knowing that something should be done and doing something about it instead of making excuses about how they should learn. It has been an amazing enhancement in those classrooms and it is a shame you criticize, instead of helping these schools prepare these children for the future because if they don't the world will not think twice and pass them by. Let them explore their window to the world and don't prevent them from moving forward.

“Bene Gesserit”

Since: Oct 07

Lincoln Park

#16 Nov 30, 2007
How long do you think these high end "materials" would last in a ghetto Chicago public school? They would be vandalized or stolen. They have all the audio-visual tech support in schools already: Parker, Latin, Northside Prep, Decatur, and other high-scoring schools. Anyway, wishful thinking is great!!!
Robin

San Diego, CA

#17 Nov 30, 2007
Good going Zion! You are a beacon.

For the above comment - Yeah, they only vandalize schools in the ghetto. They only waste money in ghetto schools. The only place bad things happen is to the bad people in the ghetto... Sometimes I am very hopeful for my young black son who is everything to his father and myself, and who will inherit this world along with his peer and other times, when I read a statements like Trixie's I want to cry.

As humans, our mechanical growth, since we crawled out of caves or down from trees or whatever, has been phenomenal. We are the gods of our ancestors imagination with our flying chariots; thunderbolts capable of causing great destruction; the ability to see, hear and communicate with people who are thousands of miles away; the ability to swim deep in the sea and go to the heavens; a lifespan 3 times as long. Unfortunately our moral growth hasn't been nearly as successful. All of the hate, greed, vanity and vapidity that has ever been, still is. Thanks Trixie.
Cynical One

Libertyville, IL

#18 Nov 30, 2007
It's lovely that the parents support the schools. It's great they have this equipment, but it would be far better if the money was spent hiring more teachers. Some of those elementary classes in Kenneth Murphy have 30 students???

“Bene Gesserit”

Since: Oct 07

Lincoln Park

#19 Nov 30, 2007
zzzzchariotsZZZZzzzzzzthunderb olts ZZZZzzz...lol. A little too much SciFi channel there? FRAK!! Anyway! I remember having a set of Encyclopedia Brittanica and a library card to do research while I was in grade school. Kids dont need that anymore!! Woohoo just Wiki or google it. Dewy Decimal System?? What the frak is that.. lol. I cant wait until we go paperless with everything. Save some trees and make the tree hugers happy. OMG!! if my iPod mini gets any smaller, I wont be able to find it in my kate Spade bag.:)
Proud Parent

Fort Wayne, IN

#20 Nov 30, 2007
I have two kids at Newport School in the Beach Park School district. The first thing that I would like to say Is THANK YOU! to the Mr. Hansen, the PTA, the teachers, and the principle. My kids have been at Newport for five years, and I have nothing but praise for the school. The kids have always received a well-rounded education (music, art, PE, after school activities, etc.)
Kids now are emerged in technology: hand-held games, computers, cell phones and texting. I think it is great that the school is embracing technology!
I always try to show my kids how the classroom relates to the real world, but this is not the case with all parents. I think it is great that the teachers are using this new technology in their classrooms.
Kids will always have to write papers, take tests, and demonstrate knowledge using conventional methods. They will also have to enter the real technological world someday. Libraries and encyclopedias are wonderful sources of information, but the internet is much more vast and up-to-date. It is important that they are able to locate information, and identify if it is reliable information. It is important that the kids are exposed to the internet, in a controlled environment, such as a classroom.
CCM

Round Lake, IL

#21 Nov 30, 2007
I commend the Beach Park school community for all their efforts. It truly does take a village. It's also sad that parents and educators are the ones who have to make up for budgetary shortfalls.
As for "Trixie's" comments, all I will say is that the best response to an obvious troll is to ignore it.
An Educator

Springfield, IL

#22 Dec 1, 2007
LP Trixie wrote:
How long do you think these high end "materials" would last in a ghetto Chicago public school? They would be vandalized or stolen. They have all the audio-visual tech support in schools already: Parker, Latin, Northside Prep, Decatur, and other high-scoring schools. Anyway, wishful thinking is great!!!
What is it with you and the fascination with the term "ghetto"? It seems every time I view comments and you're on them you constantly mention "ghetto".

Believe it or not, there are several schools in the Chicago area, that are in crime-ridden areas, that have nice technology. CICS-Prairie and CICS-Basil are two them. One is located in Englewood and the other in Roseland. Two very crime-ridden areas, but they haven't had a problem with the items being destroyed and/or stolen. Check your facts first.

Also, this article isn't about that so get a frickin' life.

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