Hundreds of birds die in western Ky.

Hundreds of birds die in western Ky.

There are 81768 comments on the The Cincinnati Enquirer story from Jan 5, 2011, titled Hundreds of birds die in western Ky.. In it, The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that:

MURRAY, Ky. - State wildlife officials say "several hundred" dead birds were found near the Murray State University campus last week.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Cincinnati Enquirer.

Imposter

Somerset, KY

#92272 Sep 1, 2013
Now I gotta go find the mop.
Good evening MissE and Wolf, good evening to the rest of you also.
I haven't laughed that hard in a while.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#92273 Sep 1, 2013
Imposter wrote:
<quoted text>I had to spit my grape-juice in the floor on that one right there. At least I avoided the screen this time.

Back then I spit pop all over the screen laughing when he first posted that. Save the ho foundation...LMAO! Ahhh man.
When I was about 16 I was in a girls private school and every Sunday we attended church services with the people that lived in a nearby town. One Sunday my best friend was acting the fool during communion and I got tickled and spewed my grape juice all over the older lady and her beehive hairdo.
I got kicked out of church for two weeks. Didn't seem like much of a punishment because it meant I got to sleep in for the next two Sundays.
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#92274 Sep 1, 2013
@Imposter.. I agree that rebels are not necessarily racists, just strongly independent like ourselves. Some of my best employees and friends have been men and women of many races and cultures and I detest bigotry and racism.

In the StovePipe Johnson attack on Henderson, there were only 3 guerillas with shotguns but the Yankees drove them off after 9 hours of fierce battle with the hog. LOL but the Indiana newpaper reported it as 300.
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#92275 Sep 1, 2013
and from the other side.. Union sergeant Robert Pierce (a Kentuckian) escaped his Confederate captors by floating naked draped over a fence railing pretending that he could not swim without the fence and needed a bath just like the other rebels that were frolicking in the river. His logic was that they could not tell much difference between a naked Yankee and a naked Rebel. It worked. LOL

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#92277 Sep 1, 2013
It's like the great Pig War--- it's hard to believe a war started over the shooting of a pig
But it did
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#92278 Sep 1, 2013
I watched Hitchcocks "The Birds" then went and closed up the peaceful chickens for the night. When he was asked how he got the birds to perform so well, his reply was that he paid them well. LOL

His "Psycho" come on in a few minutes, but watching the inside of my eyelids seems like a better choice. Good Night to all.
MMMMMMMMAGIC

Salyersville, KY

#92279 Sep 1, 2013

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#92280 Sep 1, 2013
Ancient Wolf wrote:
I watched Hitchcocks "The Birds" then went and closed up the peaceful chickens for the night. When he was asked how he got the birds to perform so well, his reply was that he paid them well. LOL

His "Psycho" come on in a few minutes, but watching the inside of my eyelids seems like a better choice. Good Night to all.
Night wolf. Have good sleep and dreams
Imposter

Somerset, KY

#92281 Sep 1, 2013
Miss E Font wrote:
It's like the great Pig War--- it's hard to believe a war started over the shooting of a pig
But it did
I had to look that one up MissE.
Interesting "as all get out"... Haha how about that slang term Wolf?
I already goggled it and every single explanation as to its origin is pure conjecture, of course I figure you was around when the phrase was first "coined" haha there's another one. So who knows you may have been the one that started it way back when... in a conversation with Adam maybe? You know I'm kidding Wolf, I am not much more than a decade your junior.

One pig getting shot over eating some potatoes made the history books and durned near changed American history. I recon the American settler had told the red coat to keep his pig out of his potato patch, and the red coat said: keep your potatoes out of my pig.
Does anyone know who ate the pig? I sure wouldn't have let it go to waste, and I would have traded a many a bushel of spuds for a pig...

Excerpt from the article I found:
For twelve years, including the Civil War period, the issue was debated. It wasn't until 1872 that the question was put to a third party for a decision. On October 21, Kaiser Wilhelm I of Germany declared the San Juan Islands American property; land north of the 49th parallel was Canadian, to the south it was American. A month later, British troops departed.

It all started over a pig! I gave three nice ones away not long ago!
Imposter

Somerset, KY

#92282 Sep 1, 2013
Ancient Wolf wrote:
and from the other side.. Union sergeant Robert Pierce (a Kentuckian) escaped his Confederate captors by floating naked draped over a fence railing pretending that he could not swim without the fence and needed a bath just like the other rebels that were frolicking in the river. His logic was that they could not tell much difference between a naked Yankee and a naked Rebel. It worked. LOL
It's interesting reading about that time period, I'm going to have to get that book you have.
History is very important, lest we forget hard lessons learned by our forefathers.
I never got a chance to pursue scholarly endeavors as much as I would have liked. I dont have a lot of regret's over that. My first daughter came along all of a sudden and you know how that goes. But hey I have time now. Wouldn't it be something if I could go back and complete my masters...then maybe even my doctorate?
Dr. Imposter....That has a nice ring to it...Dr. Imposter super --genius.. Hmmmm.
LOL

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#92283 Sep 1, 2013
Imposter wrote:
<quoted text>I had to look that one up MissE.
Interesting "as all get out"... Haha how about that slang term Wolf?
I already goggled it and every single explanation as to its origin is pure conjecture, of course I figure you was around when the phrase was first "coined" haha there's another one. So who knows you may have been the one that started it way back when... in a conversation with Adam maybe? You know I'm kidding Wolf, I am not much more than a decade your junior.

One pig getting shot over eating some potatoes made the history books and durned near changed American history. I recon the American settler had told the red coat to keep his pig out of his potato patch, and the red coat said: keep your potatoes out of my pig.
Does anyone know who ate the pig? I sure wouldn't have let it go to waste, and I would have traded a many a bushel of spuds for a pig...

Excerpt from the article I found:
For twelve years, including the Civil War period, the issue was debated. It wasn't until 1872 that the question was put to a third party for a decision. On October 21, Kaiser Wilhelm I of Germany declared the San Juan Islands American property; land north of the 49th parallel was Canadian, to the south it was American. A month later, British troops departed.

It all started over a pig! I gave three nice ones away not long ago!
It's one of my favorite stories. There is a delightful children's book about it.
Imposter

Somerset, KY

#92284 Sep 1, 2013
Miss E if I could lay hands on whoever is throwing those peanuts and stuff at you from the peanut gallery up in the balcony there... I would slap them around a little bit. It looks like they would just go away if they dont like what they see here.
Why

Frankfort, KY

#92285 Sep 1, 2013
What is making the die
Imposter

Somerset, KY

#92286 Sep 1, 2013
I'll correspond with you fine people in a week or so Lord willing. I'm off down Wolfs way tomorrow to do a little vacationing and fishing, and get a change of scenery for a while.
Remember now- Too Tall loves you.
Misty eyed

Louisa, KY

#92287 Sep 1, 2013
Imposter wrote:
I'll correspond with you fine people in a week or so Lord willing. I'm off down Wolfs way tomorrow to do a little vacationing and fishing, and get a change of scenery for a while.
Remember now- Too Tall loves you.
Hope you catch some tasty fish;) Been good hearing your stories. Have a nice trip;)
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#92288 Sep 2, 2013
Imposter wrote:
<quoted text> It's interesting reading about that time period, I'm going to have to get that book you have.
History is very important, lest we forget hard lessons learned by our forefathers.
I never got a chance to pursue scholarly endeavors as much as I would have liked. I dont have a lot of regret's over that. My first daughter came along all of a sudden and you know how that goes. But hey I have time now. Wouldn't it be something if I could go back and complete my masters...then maybe even my doctorate?
Dr. Imposter....That has a nice ring to it...Dr. Imposter super --genius.. Hmmmm.
LOL
I never cared for History at all during school years. It was just too dry a subject especially the way it was taught. Then as I got older, I began to question as to where I came from? why am I the way I am? and others? The pivotal moment was when a neighbor passed on and the children were going to throw away 7 boxes of assorted attic papers and had no good way to discard those dusty boxes and contents and being the helpful person that I am, I said I will take them and use that old stuff to start my fires in my fireplace.

So early one morning, I had a handful of that old yellowed paper and was just getting ready to stick it under my kindling. I looked and most of it was just hand written letters, deeds, receipts, even love letters, peoples thoughts, and just some general "junk" including the neighbor's grandfather's ponderings over what to do with his one slave named "George". It turned out that George was not really the slave we had heard about all our life, but was a blacksmith that just lived on the land, eked out a living, and did work for the "massa" in exchange for the "massa" writing out the amounts that George should charge other people for his work since George was illiterate, but most skilled at repairing buggys and wagons and other tools.

But wait!! These were real people that lived and died right here, walked the same ground as me, and here is a piece of paper where land was given to start a church in 1842 that is still in existence today. This stuff is too important to start my fire. Here is a piece of paper about my great grandfather going off to join the Civil War. I never knew I had ancestors in that war. Nobody ever told me that. Ahhh the internet..I began to not only trace my own ancestors but also the neighbor's. Thank You George.
Star Gazer

Duluth, GA

#92289 Sep 2, 2013
Ancient Wolf wrote:
<quoted text>
I never cared for History at all during school years. It was just too dry a subject especially the way it was taught. Then as I got older, I began to question as to where I came from? why am I the way I am? and others? The pivotal moment was when a neighbor passed on and the children were going to throw away 7 boxes of assorted attic papers and had no good way to discard those dusty boxes and contents and being the helpful person that I am, I said I will take them and use that old stuff to start my fires in my fireplace.
So early one morning, I had a handful of that old yellowed paper and was just getting ready to stick it under my kindling. I looked and most of it was just hand written letters, deeds, receipts, even love letters, peoples thoughts, and just some general "junk" including the neighbor's grandfather's ponderings over what to do with his one slave named "George". It turned out that George was not really the slave we had heard about all our life, but was a blacksmith that just lived on the land, eked out a living, and did work for the "massa" in exchange for the "massa" writing out the amounts that George should charge other people for his work since George was illiterate, but most skilled at repairing buggys and wagons and other tools.
But wait!! These were real people that lived and died right here, walked the same ground as me, and here is a piece of paper where land was given to start a church in 1842 that is still in existence today. This stuff is too important to start my fire. Here is a piece of paper about my great grandfather going off to join the Civil War. I never knew I had ancestors in that war. Nobody ever told me that. Ahhh the internet..I began to not only trace my own ancestors but also the neighbor's. Thank You George.
. Wow, I loved this. I have always loved history and always wanted to learn more.
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#92290 Sep 2, 2013
My most treasured Civil War story is about a pro-union old lady that went to tell the Yankees that the Rebels occupying her town were bragging that their numbers were not as big as they had claimed.

So she and another old lady rode their horses all night long over a 20 mile stretch of brambles and briars to alert the Union soldiers that they were bring tricked.

The route they took to circumvent the rebel forces would have brought them over the hill of my homestead and in my mind's eye I can visualize that. Then a 100 years later there is my grandfather plowing beind that old mule, pausing to remove his old floppy hat and taking the red handerchief out of his bibs to wipe the sweat off his brow and then 150 years later, here I sit and can see it all.
Oh really

United States

#92291 Sep 2, 2013
Ancient Wolf wrote:
<quoted text>
I never cared for History at all during school years. It was just too dry a subject especially the way it was taught. Then as I got older, I began to question as to where I came from? why am I the way I am? and others? The pivotal moment was when a neighbor passed on and the children were going to throw away 7 boxes of assorted attic papers and had no good way to discard those dusty boxes and contents and being the helpful person that I am, I said I will take them and use that old stuff to start my fires in my fireplace.
So early one morning, I had a handful of that old yellowed paper and was just getting ready to stick it under my kindling. I looked and most of it was just hand written letters, deeds, receipts, even love letters, peoples thoughts, and just some general "junk" including the neighbor's grandfather's ponderings over what to do with his one slave named "George". It turned out that George was not really the slave we had heard about all our life, but was a blacksmith that just lived on the land, eked out a living, and did work for the "massa" in exchange for the "massa" writing out the amounts that George should charge other people for his work since George was illiterate, but most skilled at repairing buggys and wagons and other tools.
But wait!! These were real people that lived and died right here, walked the same ground as me, and here is a piece of paper where land was given to start a church in 1842 that is still in existence today. This stuff is too important to start my fire. Here is a piece of paper about my great grandfather going off to join the Civil War. I never knew I had ancestors in that war. Nobody ever told me that. Ahhh the internet..I began to not only trace my own ancestors but also the neighbor's. Thank You George.
...and history comes to life!!! How is it history cannot become as interesting as that when one is sitting in a high school history class? That text book crams in facts and dates and I guess the teacher has to finish the book in record time, leaving no time for "enhancements" . In my school days the history teacher really wanted to be a full time coach and that could explain the straight textbook teaching also. Another big thing, and must likely reason is that teenage ears and brains simply aren't ready to hear all these stories about the old wars and times when those adolescent hormones are jumping all over the place...
Anne

United States

#92292 Sep 2, 2013
Heeheehee. Looks like I posted to AW under last nights sarcastic name. Whoops

Anyway! Good Morning to everyone and enjoy the holiday!! I'm gonna labor on this Labor Day and mow. This rain we've been having has kick started the yard and its up to me to deal with it.

Prayer request: the father of the young man that works for me had a horrible motorcycle accident last Friday. Threw him across the interstate median into the other traffic lanes. About every bone from the waist down is broken. Above the waist was just skinned up. No head injuries. He and his wife had just finished a 2200 mile motorcycle vacation and he had gone to buy a new Harley. He left the Harley store, got on the interstate and a truck hit him.

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