black friday - racist term or not?

black friday - racist term or not?

Posted in the Utica Forum

First Prev
of 4
Next Last
Frosty flakes

Ithaca, NY

#1 Nov 29, 2013
I was thinking about this today for some reason, why would you call it "black friday" why not white friday or something else.

Is there some sort of racial bias going on here? Why is it "black"?

Stupid me.

Judged:

24

15

12

Reply »
Report Abuse Judge it!
Educate

Utica, NY

#2 Nov 29, 2013
Yes stupid you and everyone on this site. What is with all the racism of all kinds here on Utica Topix? If its a joke or whatever it is, end it. Its old. Have some progress in your life except blaming skin tones. Or be labeled shallow, ignorant, trash.

Judged:

27

21

18

Reply »
Report Abuse Judge it!
Kristoph

Davenport, IA

#3 Nov 29, 2013
Frosty flakes wrote:
I was thinking about this today for some reason, why would you call it "black friday" why not white friday or something else.
Is there some sort of racial bias going on here? Why is it "black"?
Stupid me.
It is often said that racism is born of ignorance. You must be one of the biggest racists on the planet if you are ignorant of the origins / meaning of the term "Black Friday".

Judged:

31

21

18

Reply »
Report Abuse Judge it!
Teach

Oneida, NY

#4 Nov 29, 2013
Kristoph wrote:
<quoted text>
It is often said that racism is born of ignorance. You must be one of the biggest racists on the planet if you are ignorant of the origins / meaning of the term "Black Friday".
Calling someone ignorant because they don't know something you know is ignorant itself. Rather than insulting someone, why not share your knowledge?

Origin of the term

"Black Friday" as a term has been used in multiple contexts, going back to the 19th century, where in the United States it was associated with a financial crisis of 1869. The earliest known invocation of "Black Friday" to refer to shopping on the day after Thanksgiving was made in a public relations newsletter from 1961 that is clear on the negative implications of the name and its origin in Philadelphia:
For downtown merchants throughout the nation, the biggest shopping days normally are the two following Thanksgiving Day. Resulting traffic jams are an irksome problem to the police and, in Philadelphia, it became customary for officers to refer to the post-Thanksgiving days as Black Friday and Black Saturday. Hardly a stimulus for good business, the problem was discussed by the merchants with their Deputy City Representative, Abe S. Rosen, one of the country's most experienced municipal PR executives. He recommended adoption of a positive approach which would convert Black Friday and Black Saturday to Big Friday and Big Saturday.[22]
The attempt to rename Black Friday was unsuccessful, and its continued use is shown in a 1966 publication on the day's significance in Philadelphia:
JANUARY 1966 – "Black Friday" is the name which the Philadelphia Police Department has given to the Friday following Thanksgiving Day. It is not a term of endearment to them. "Black Friday" officially opens the Christmas shopping season in Center City, and it usually brings massive traffic jams and over-crowded sidewalks as the downtown stores are mobbed from opening to closing.[6]
The term "Black Friday" began to get wider exposure around 1975, as shown by two newspaper articles from November 29, 1975, both datelined Philadelphia. The first reference is in an article entitled "Army vs. Navy: A Dimming Splendor", in The New York Times:
Philadelphia police and bus drivers call it "Black Friday" – that day each year between Thanksgiving Day and the Army–Navy Game. It is the busiest shopping and traffic day of the year in the Bicentennial City as the Christmas list is checked off and the Eastern college football season nears conclusion.
The derivation is also clear in an Associated Press article entitled "Folks on Buying Spree Despite Down Economy", which ran in Pennsylvania's Titusville Herald on the same day:
Store aisles were jammed. Escalators were nonstop people. It was the first day of the Christmas shopping season and despite the economy, folks here went on a buying spree... "That's why the bus drivers and cab drivers call today 'Black Friday,'" a sales manager at Gimbels said as she watched a traffic cop trying to control a crowd of jaywalkers. "They think in terms of headaches it gives them."
The term's spread was gradual, however, and in 1985 the Philadelphia Inquirer reported that retailers in Cincinnati and Los Angeles were still unaware of the term.[23]

Judged:

13

12

12

Reply »
Report Abuse Judge it!
ted

Utica, NY

#5 Nov 29, 2013
Black Friday originated in the antebellum south. Fridays were generally the day that the white slave master would ride off in to town to sell a portion of his crop or buy supplies. It was on this Friday that the wife of the slave/plantation owner would get all the best black male bucks in to the big house to pleasure her. The blacks that had been working in the field would be lined up to pump and service the wife of the plantation owner. Hence why this is known as "Black" Friday. Whether it is racist or not I'll let you be the judge.

Judged:

80

36

30

Reply »
Report Abuse Judge it!
What is with you

Utica, NY

#6 Nov 29, 2013
Educate wrote:
Yes stupid you and everyone on this site. What is with all the racism of all kinds here on Utica Topix? If its a joke or whatever it is, end it. Its old. Have some progress in your life except blaming skin tones. Or be labeled shallow, ignorant, trash.
What is up with you? I don't think this question warranted you to call someone stupid. Actually, It is not a bad question. Try not to overreact to comments and make assumptions. Try shopping instead.

Judged:

12

11

10

Reply »
Report Abuse Judge it!
You need help

Utica, NY

#7 Nov 29, 2013
ted wrote:
Black Friday originated in the antebellum south. Fridays were generally the day that the white slave master would ride off in to town to sell a portion of his crop or buy supplies. It was on this Friday that the wife of the slave/plantation owner would get all the best black male bucks in to the big house to pleasure her. The blacks that had been working in the field would be lined up to pump and service the wife of the plantation owner. Hence why this is known as "Black" Friday. Whether it is racist or not I'll let you be the judge.
Seek help immediately.

Judged:

24

10

10

Reply »
Report Abuse Judge it!
Sal the Stockbroker

Lowville, NY

#8 Nov 29, 2013
I'm sure that Black Friday means that the blacks can fight and steal at WalMart without being arrested, but only where they can't really get by the schwoogie buzzer on normal days.

Judged:

22

18

16

Reply »
Report Abuse Judge it!
idontcare

Powder Springs, GA

#9 Nov 18, 2014
All of you are racist and I hope you burn in hell.
Stacysemen

Roslindale, MA

#10 Nov 18, 2014
Cant be racist.... Shoppers buy stuff not steal it. No your answer is no black friday is not for people that steal
accountant

Utica, NY

#11 Nov 19, 2014
It is called Black Friday because it is the day most stores go into the black on their balance sheets. Up until the holiday shopping season they are supposedly in the red. Nothing racist - the left side of a profit/loss balance sheet (profits) is in black, the loss side in red.

Judged:

25

10

9

Reply »
Report Abuse Judge it!
Jesses

Versailles, KY

#12 Nov 20, 2014
Yes it is, needs to be called African American Friday...
Gayby

Atlanta, GA

#13 Nov 24, 2014
ted wrote:
Black Friday originated in the antebellum south. Fridays were generally the day that the white slave master would ride off in to town to sell a portion of his crop or buy supplies. It was on this Friday that the wife of the slave/plantation owner would get all the best black male bucks in to the big house to pleasure her. The blacks that had been working in the field would be lined up to pump and service the wife of the plantation owner. Hence why this is known as "Black" Friday. Whether it is racist or not I'll let you be the judge.
Lol nice.
MojoCojo

Solsberry, IN

#14 Nov 28, 2014
ted wrote:
Black Friday originated in the antebellum south. Fridays were generally the day that the white slave master would ride off in to town to sell a portion of his crop or buy supplies. It was on this Friday that the wife of the slave/plantation owner would get all the best black male bucks in to the big house to pleasure her. The blacks that had been working in the field would be lined up to pump and service the wife of the plantation owner. Hence why this is known as "Black" Friday. Whether it is racist or not I'll let you be the judge.
You are the only person I know of that actually knows about this and is willing to discuss it. Thanks for bringing it up.
Wondering

Fitchburg, MA

#15 Nov 28, 2014
Frosty flakes wrote:
I was thinking about this today for some reason, why would you call it "black friday" why not white friday or something else.
Is there some sort of racial bias going on here? Why is it "black"?
Stupid me.
OMG don't give them something else to riot about. It's just a word that states a color. I'm sure there is a reason this word was chosen and it has nothing to do with the African Race. Anyone know why it's used?
Wondering

Fitchburg, MA

#16 Nov 28, 2014
ted wrote:
Black Friday originated in the antebellum south. Fridays were generally the day that the white slave master would ride off in to town to sell a portion of his crop or buy supplies. It was on this Friday that the wife of the slave/plantation owner would get all the best black male bucks in to the big house to pleasure her. The blacks that had been working in the field would be lined up to pump and service the wife of the plantation owner. Hence why this is known as "Black" Friday. Whether it is racist or not I'll let you be the judge.
So-what does this have to do with shopping?
slapanut

Lowville, NY

#17 Nov 28, 2014
Frosty flakes wrote:
I was thinking about this today for some reason, why would you call it "black friday" why not white friday or something else.
Is there some sort of racial bias going on here? Why is it "black"?
Stupid me.
F^^k off and your stupid whiney racist comments. The trouble with all blacks they take offense too easily.
Rixterz

Southport, UK

#18 Nov 28, 2014
Frosty flakes wrote:
I was thinking about this today for some reason, why would you call it "black friday" why not white friday or something else.
Is there some sort of racial bias going on here? Why is it "black"?
Stupid me.
So why would it be alright to call it "white friday"?
Rixterz

Southport, UK

#19 Nov 28, 2014
Frosty flakes wrote:
I was thinking about this today for some reason, why would you call it "black friday" why not white friday or something else.
Is there some sort of racial bias going on here? Why is it "black"?
Stupid me.
Racism only exists because people take offence to it. If blacks just shut up about the use of the word "black" in any context being racist, nobody would get annoyed at the constant whining about whether something they've said is racist or not. "Black Friday" isn't racist, obviously, as nobody is being discriminated against, period, regardless of any mention of colour. It's a name which has its own reason behind it.
luvlyroz

San Diego, CA

#20 Nov 28, 2014
Teach wrote:
<quoted text>
Calling someone ignorant because they don't know something you know is ignorant itself. Rather than insulting someone, why not share your knowledge?
Origin of the term
"Black Friday" as a term has been used in multiple contexts, going back to the 19th century, where in the United States it was associated with a financial crisis of 1869. The earliest known invocation of "Black Friday" to refer to shopping on the day after Thanksgiving was made in a public relations newsletter from 1961 that is clear on the negative implications of the name and its origin in Philadelphia:
For downtown merchants throughout the nation, the biggest shopping days normally are the two following Thanksgiving Day. Resulting traffic jams are an irksome problem to the police and, in Philadelphia, it became customary for officers to refer to the post-Thanksgiving days as Black Friday and Black Saturday. Hardly a stimulus for good business, the problem was discussed by the merchants with their Deputy City Representative, Abe S. Rosen, one of the country's most experienced municipal PR executives. He recommended adoption of a positive approach which would convert Black Friday and Black Saturday to Big Friday and Big Saturday.[22]
The attempt to rename Black Friday was unsuccessful, and its continued use is shown in a 1966 publication on the day's significance in Philadelphia:
JANUARY 1966 – "Black Friday" is the name which the Philadelphia Police Department has given to the Friday following Thanksgiving Day. It is not a term of endearment to them. "Black Friday" officially opens the Christmas shopping season in Center City, and it usually brings massive traffic jams and over-crowded sidewalks as the downtown stores are mobbed from opening to closing.[6]
The term "Black Friday" began to get wider exposure around 1975, as shown by two newspaper articles from November 29, 1975, both datelined Philadelphia. The first reference is in an article entitled "Army vs. Navy: A Dimming Splendor", in The New York Times:
Philadelphia police and bus drivers call it "Black Friday" – that day each year between Thanksgiving Day and the Army–Navy Game. It is the busiest shopping and traffic day of the year in the Bicentennial City as the Christmas list is checked off and the Eastern college football season nears conclusion.
The derivation is also clear in an Associated Press article entitled "Folks on Buying Spree Despite Down Economy", which ran in Pennsylvania's Titusville Herald on the same day:
Store aisles were jammed. Escalators were nonstop people. It was the first day of the Christmas shopping season and despite the economy, folks here went on a buying spree... "That's why the bus drivers and cab drivers call today 'Black Friday,'" a sales manager at Gimbels said as she watched a traffic cop trying to control a crowd of jaywalkers. "They think in terms of headaches it gives them."
The term's spread was gradual, however, and in 1985 the Philadelphia Inquirer reported that retailers in Cincinnati and Los Angeles were still unaware of the term.[23]
Love your comment Teach and it is all true with one exception. Go back a little further to slave buying/trading

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 4
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Utica Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
WHY Utica is a rustbelt poverty hole of FAIL! 17 min Epic 3
Washington Post 20 min American 1
Bella Regina 43 min Talia 6
Usmails IQ 53 min Mohawk Welfare Va... 4
Bobbyo is running for County Legislator 55 min Mohawk Welfare Va... 13
Utica gets an Apple store!! 1 hr TRUMP FAN 64
stalking USMAIL WHILE I CANT FIX A SHOE STRING 2 hr Sammy indeed 13
PHOTO!! Who is wizzing in the Saranac Beer Brew... 7 hr Wanna be famous 10
tenney 7 hr THANKS O 79
Kaitlyn Conley (Jun '16) 8 hr dead corpse 193

Utica Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

Utica Mortgages