Romano: Library in Financial trouble
David Smith

New York, NY

#81 Jun 27, 2013
Jim Rudnik wrote:
The New Hartford Town Budget collects revenues of approximately $31,000,000.$16,000 is is .0005% of the Town budget. The population of the Town is 22,000.$16,000 costs each resident 73 cents or 15 cents per year for 5 years. That's how I define minor. The $16,000 is not coming out of your pocket only.
How much does the library receive from the town? Is it $400K? if so,$16K is 4% of their budget. Is it OK for the town to decrease library funding by 4% next year?
Brad Bates

Utica, NY

#82 Jun 27, 2013
Stop complaining. If you live in New Hartford you can afford it.
Poverty

New York, NY

#83 Jun 27, 2013
Brad Bates wrote:
Stop complaining. If you live in New Hartford you can afford it.
The elite people can... Did you know about 7% of the people in New Hartford are below the poverty level?

http://www.city-data.com/poverty/poverty-New-...
The Joy Ride Club

Whitesboro, NY

#84 Jun 27, 2013
What happens when another long time employee retires? They will ask for their grab bag of cash too when they head out the door. This will cost the library a lot more then just $16,000 when its all said and done. Perhaps we should identify these older, long time employees now. I know Mr Plembeck's library career is going to get a close look.
Jim Rudnik wrote:
The New Hartford Town Budget collects revenues of approximately $31,000,000.$16,000 is is .0005% of the Town budget. The population of the Town is 22,000.$16,000 costs each resident 73 cents or 15 cents per year for 5 years. That's how I define minor. The $16,000 is not coming out of your pocket only.
Jim Rudnik

Utica, NY

#85 Jun 27, 2013
I suspect we can all afford 15 cents a year for 5 years. Feel free to complain about the cost of gasoline, meat, milk, automobiles, clothing, health care and union dues. Not a small pittance for a 30 year employee the libray.
Missing the point

New Hartford, NY

#86 Jun 27, 2013
Jim, you are totally missing the point. It's not just the $16000 it's the fact that the library does not have the money, they are already working in the red, this was against current policy, this sets a policy for future directors without even changing the current policy, the NH library is not 30 years old so there is no way he worked for the library for 30 years, he did not expect it so it was not a necessary expense.

I do not care if it is 15 cents or 15 dollars the point is that it was not an expense that was instrumental to keeping the library doors open. If I have to stay in a budget for my family I certainly expect that the trustees of the library should keep a better handle on their own fiscal responsibilities. If they do not know how to do that, then they should resign. I am sick of people giving my hard earned money away just because they want to be nice. Some decisions are hard and as trustees they have to make them based on what is best for the library and the residents of New Hartford who pay for it.
History

New York, NY

#87 Jun 27, 2013
Little is known about the first New Hartford library. A feature article in the September 7, 1952 Utica Observer Dispatch mentions an 1842 library that was partially financed by a state initiative. The article goes on to state that in 1892 Morgan Butler, a New Hartford civic leader, donated a building (Butler Memorial Hall) for a public assembly area, a library, and public offices. The Library in this building "contained 300 choice volumes and a large number of leading periodicals and newspapers", all provided by Mr. Butler's sisters and sisters-in-law with thirty books given by then Senator J. S. Sherman (later vice-president of the United States). Unfortunately the Butler Library was short lived. The Utica Public Library was incorporated as a public library in 1893 under University Law, Chapter 387 of 1893. This served as a de-facto library for New Hartford for many years
In 1952 another public library was initiated by the New Hartford Women's Republican Club. Through their efforts the library at the New York State Institute of Applied Arts and Science (now known as Mohawk Valley Community College) became available for the residents of the town and village. Within a few years, however, the Institute left its Genesee Street Location (now the Wedgewood Apartments) and moved to the present campus in East Utica. Again New Hartford had no library. In 1975, the Utica Public Library had separated from the Mid-York Library System and was experiencing financial difficulties. In an effort to solve some of those problems, the Town of New Hartford was contacted to institute a user's fee for New Hartford cardholders.
In the fall of 1975, a group of individuals in the town of New Hartford felt that a town resident should not pay for the privilege of reading. Therefore a group of ten housewives made plans to start a library in the town. On May 6, 1976, their grass roots effort enabled the New Hartford Volunteer Library to open. The New Hartford School Board allowed the volunteers to convert a basement shower room in the vacant Point School into a very small library. Dr. Clark Case donated his entire library to form the nucleus of the collection. The library functioned with a volunteer staff opening only on Thursday afternoons. It soon outgrew the original room and moved to a larger classroom. The collection of current fiction and non-fiction increased through donations and a few purchases. The circulation grew slowly and steadily. At the same time, the library ran story hours for preschool children and began a summer reading program for school children. The village of New Hartford received a HUD grant to convert the Point School into senior citizen housing. The grant required a community activity in the facility. This enabled a 2600 square foot library to be located in the basement of the Point School. In 1983, the library moved into the new quarters and received a provisional charter from the state of New York Board of Regents. It also became a member of the Mid-York Library System. This allowed New Hartford to borrow books from other libraries and use the training and other expertise of this large regional library system. The first professional librarian was hired. A permanent charter was granted by the New York State Board of Regents on January 19, 1988. The library was then open six days a week and soon had the fourth highest circulation in the three county region.
History

New York, NY

#88 Jun 27, 2013
By the early nineties it became evident that the library was much too small. Three acres of land was acquired (part donated, part purchased) on Oxford Road. In April 1994, a bond issue to build a 7,500 square foot library on Oxford Road was put to referendum and defeated. A new board of trustees evaluated over thirty sites and explored such issues as consolidation with the Utica Public Library or with the New Hartford Central School library. The trustees concluded that the New Hartford community would be best served by erecting a 10,000 square foot building on the present site which was owned by the library.
History

New York, NY

#89 Jun 27, 2013
First part did not post...
Little is known about the first New Hartford library. A feature article in the September 7, 1952 Utica Observer Dispatch mentions an 1842 library that was partially financed by a state initiative. The article goes on to state that in 1892 Morgan Butler, a New Hartford civic leader, donated a building (Butler Memorial Hall) for a public assembly area, a library, and public offices. The Library in this building "contained 300 choice volumes and a large number of leading periodicals and newspapers", all provided by Mr. Butler's sisters and sisters-in-law with thirty books given by then Senator J. S. Sherman (later vice-president of the United States). Unfortunately the Butler Library was short lived. The Utica Public Library was incorporated as a public library in 1893 under University Law, Chapter 387 of 1893. This served as a de-facto library for New Hartford for many years

In 1952 another public library was initiated by the New Hartford Women's Republican Club. Through their efforts the library at the New York State Institute of Applied Arts and Science (now known as Mohawk Valley Community College) became available for the residents of the town and village. Within a few years, however, the Institute left its Genesee Street Location (now the Wedgewood Apartments) and moved to the present campus in East Utica. Again New Hartford had no library. In 1975, the Utica Public Library had separated from the Mid-York Library System and was experiencing financial difficulties. In an effort to solve some of those problems, the Town of New Hartford was contacted to institute a user's fee for New Hartford cardholders.

In the fall of 1975, a group of individuals in the town of New Hartford felt that a town resident should not pay for the privilege of reading. Therefore a group of ten housewives made plans to start a library in the town. On May 6, 1976, their grass roots effort enabled the New Hartford Volunteer Library to open. The New Hartford School Board allowed the volunteers to convert a basement shower room in the vacant Point School into a very small library. Dr. Clark Case donated his entire library to form the nucleus of the collection. The library functioned with a volunteer staff opening only on Thursday afternoons. It soon outgrew the original room and moved to a larger classroom. The collection of current fiction and non-fiction increased through donations and a few purchases. The circulation grew slowly and steadily. At the same time, the library ran story hours for preschool children and began a summer reading program for school children. The village of New Hartford received a HUD grant to convert the Point School into senior citizen housing. The grant required a community activity in the facility. This enabled a 2600 square foot library to be located in the basement of the Point School. In 1983, the library moved into the new quarters and received a provisional charter from the state of New York Board of Regents. It also became a member of the Mid-York Library System. This allowed New Hartford to borrow books from other libraries and use the training and other expertise of this large regional library system. The first professional librarian was hired. A permanent charter was granted by the New York State Board of Regents on January 19, 1988. The library was then open six days a week and soon had the fourth highest circulation in the three county region.
History

New York, NY

#90 Jun 27, 2013
Oops sorry for the double post. Thought the long part did not go through the first time...
Awesome

Woburn, MA

#91 Jun 27, 2013
Thanks for then great post. Best thing I've read on topix in years. Hopefully there is alot more to the story for another generation to read someday. Sick of guys like this waitr and flemma trying to owe the library. Generations of progress shunned by a few destructionists.
Tory King

Utica, NY

#92 Jun 27, 2013
Thank you for the history of the library. Everyone in New Hartford should read it. Excellent. We cannot allow two anarchists like Ed Wiatr and Ed Flemma destroy such a great asset.
Interesting

New Hartford, NY

#93 Jun 27, 2013
Great history! Thank you for taking the time to post it. Are you verifying the age of the library and that the recently retired director was the first paid employee from 1983 or just that the library can trace its roots to the 1800's. actually, it did receive its 501c3 status in march of 1977.

As for Awesome your comments are uncalled for. Wiatr and Flemma are not trying to own the library, they just voted against spending money the library does not have and goes against policy. Not sure what you have against them, how they voted makes sense no matter how you look at it. There has been no explanation for why the other trustees voted the way they did. But since they are the ones to spend unnecessary money, why are you not attacking them instead of he two who voted to save money.
Bella Chase

Utica, NY

#94 Jun 27, 2013
Awesome's comments are called for. Ed Flemma and Ed Wiatr are despised in New Hartford. Ed Wiatr is a contentious blowhard intent on destroying the Town of New Hartford and The New Hartford Library. He HATES New Hartford. Ed Wiatr is born and raised in New York Mills. He could care less about New Hartford. Ed Flemma is Ed Wiatr's brother-in-law. He too has no love for New Hartford. He is intent on destroying the library. He wants to rip apart the New Hartford School District too. Attend the school board meetings in the fall. Watch what he does. He and Ed Wiatr have big plans for the school district. First the Town, then the library, next the school district. Simply chart their actions. Their intentions are quite obvious. For whatever reason, they HATE New Hartford.
Brad and Tom and Jim

Whitesboro, NY

#95 Jun 28, 2013
Nope. Felmma and Wiatr are trying to save the library. Romano and crew are putting our library in danger because of their wasteful spending on non-library items. Thank you Mr Flemma and Mr Wiatr fore protecting our library.
Awesome wrote:
Thanks for then great post. Best thing I've read on topix in years. Hopefully there is alot more to the story for another generation to read someday. Sick of guys like this waitr and flemma trying to owe the library. Generations of progress shunned by a few destructionists.
Lol

New Hartford, NY

#96 Jun 28, 2013
Bella Chase you are so funny! Ed Flemma is not Ed Wiatr's brother-in-law! Ed Wiatr is widowed, but his wife was Ed Flemma's second cousin, oh by the way John Klein, another library trustee, is also married to a distant cousin - oh the conspiracy! Also, Ed Flemma is the third generation of Flemma's serving on a school board. I think you are the one trying to stir up trouble and hurt New Hartford.

If you are so concerned, then you should do your civic duty and run for the library or school board!

Thanks for posting such drivel it made me laugh.
Jean Poole

United States

#97 Jun 28, 2013
This is awesome! I'm going to write a book about the library. "As the Pages Turn" It's sure to be a best seller!
NH Historical Society

Whitesboro, NY

#98 Jun 28, 2013
One interesting tidbit about the history of the library was that it was built with taxpayer dollars in grants from NY State, the federal government as well the Town of New Hartford. Accordingly to and OD article written when ground was broke on the new library building the library was supposed to be turned over to the town when it was completed. That never happened and to this day no one knows who actually owns the NH "public" library!
Billy Rumsfeld

United States

#99 Jun 28, 2013
Ed Wiatr owns the library - thats why he won't spend any money!
reality

Utica, NY

#100 Jun 28, 2013
Bella Chase wrote:
Awesome's comments are called for. Ed Flemma and Ed Wiatr are despised in New Hartford. Ed Wiatr is a contentious blowhard intent on destroying the Town of New Hartford and The New Hartford Library. He HATES New Hartford. Ed Wiatr is born and raised in New York Mills. He could care less about New Hartford. Ed Flemma is Ed Wiatr's brother-in-law. He too has no love for New Hartford. He is intent on destroying the library. He wants to rip apart the New Hartford School District too. Attend the school board meetings in the fall. Watch what he does. He and Ed Wiatr have big plans for the school district. First the Town, then the library, next the school district. Simply chart their actions. Their intentions are quite obvious. For whatever reason, they HATE New Hartford.
Ed Flemma just won election to School Board against incumbent chair. How do we get to "despised" from there?

Where Ed Wiatr is from is irrelevant. He is in NH now, and has been for a long time. He pays his NH taxes, so he is a NH citizen in good standing. This is America, most of us are from somewhere else.

Ed Wiatr is not Ed Flemma's brother in law. How many times are you going to repeat this nonsense?

From what they have said, and based upon their conduct to date, the "Ed's" are asking for:
- Accountability from NH officials for their actions. Explanation of why the Library Board chose to spend $16,000 on a non-essential when they are in the red would be a good place to start.
- Fiscal responsibility
- NH officials, who have been entrusted with the welfare of the Town, to follow the written rules that govern their jurisdiction in a rational manner, consistent with facts
- Modification of the written rules when the rules don't work well
From their asks, I see only that change might be in order, not the doom and destruction that you seem to fear.

You and Awesome should visit the library, they have some good books on the subject of critical thinking there.

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