Utica La Cosa Nostra
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Insider

New York, NY

#1 Dec 2, 2012
1920 – Prohibition begins, unintentionally creating opportunities for criminal gangs to meet the nation’s thirst for liquor.

1925 – Salvatore and Joseph Falcone, brothers who immigrated from Sicily, become American citizens.

1930-31 – Five different people die in unsolved homicides attributed to the illegal alcohol trade.

1933 – Prohibition is repealed, but gangs that controlled bootlegging rackets continue to profit from selling illegally made alcohol cheaply.

1939 – The federal government wins convictions against the Falcone brothers in a tax case, only to see their efforts reversed in a case that reached the U.S. Supreme Court.

1947 – Ace of Clubs nightclub owner Fred Morelli is gunned down outside the club, creating calls for investigations into the many unsolved homicides in Utica since Prohibition days. These calls go unheeded.

November 1957 – State police raid a meeting of gangland leaders from around the Northeast in Apalachin, near Binghamton. Salvatore and Joseph Falcone are present.

1958 – State investigations begin into allegations of gambling, prostitution and racketeering and whether Utica police and the Oneida County district attorney have ignored evidence of such crimes. Joseph Falcone disappears and does not re-emerge for about four years.

1959 – Utica Newspapers win the Pulitzer Prize for meritorious public service for coverage of the organized crime investigations and of corruption in Utica city government.

1961 – A series of convictions related to the state investigations culminates with a jury finding former Utica Deputy Police Chief Vincent Fiore guilty of taking protection money from a brothel owner. In all, 22 people were convicted and nine public officials resigned or were removed because of the probes.

1963 – Convicted murderer and dope peddler Joseph Valachi testifies to a U.S. Senate committee that there were “80 to 100” members of the Mafia in Utica. He also testifies he had met Salvatore Falcone in Utica during a rumpus over a dice game in the 1930s. Valachi’s testimony helps build public understanding of how the shadowy underworld of organized crime had operated for decades.

1970 – Bill Conley is blown up in his car near Mr. Joe’s Restaurant in South Utica. He had been a business partner of a man named Al Marrone.

1972 – Salvatore Falcone dies in Miami, where he had spent much of his time over the previous few decades.

1976 – Marrone dies after being ambushed in a shootout that left bullet holes in nearby houses along Kathleen Street.

1983 – Three people are murdered in the first month of the year, including attorney Joseph Dacquino, an associate of attorney Louis Brindisi who was killed inside Brindisi’s South Utica offices. Brindisi had defended figures linked to organized crime. Later that year, other violence would occur in Utica, including the bombing of a house.

1990 – Several men are convicted of racketeering over a period between 1973 and 1989. Crimes cited in the federal trial included Marrone’s homicide.

1992 – Joseph Falcone dies.
ron

Utica, NY

#2 Dec 2, 2012
Is Peter their grandson?
Hello

Ithaca, NY

#3 Dec 3, 2012
The good ole days..now top everyone is a wanna be
what

United States

#4 Dec 3, 2012
wanabe is you kiddinbg me the blacks the russians spanish and boznians 100% more ruthless

Level 5

Since: Oct 09

Herkimer, NY

#5 Dec 3, 2012
Just goes to show you how much the Italians have ruined this city.
Larry

Herkimer, NY

#6 Dec 3, 2012
Insider wrote:
1920 – Prohibition begins, unintentionally creating opportunities for criminal gangs to meet the nation’s thirst for liquor.
1925 – Salvatore and Joseph Falcone, brothers who immigrated from Sicily, become American citizens.
1930-31 – Five different people die in unsolved homicides attributed to the illegal alcohol trade.
1933 – Prohibition is repealed, but gangs that controlled bootlegging rackets continue to profit from selling illegally made alcohol cheaply.
1939 – The federal government wins convictions against the Falcone brothers in a tax case, only to see their efforts reversed in a case that reached the U.S. Supreme Court.
1947 – Ace of Clubs nightclub owner Fred Morelli is gunned down outside the club, creating calls for investigations into the many unsolved homicides in Utica since Prohibition days. These calls go unheeded.
November 1957 – State police raid a meeting of gangland leaders from around the Northeast in Apalachin, near Binghamton. Salvatore and Joseph Falcone are present.
1958 – State investigations begin into allegations of gambling, prostitution and racketeering and whether Utica police and the Oneida County district attorney have ignored evidence of such crimes. Joseph Falcone disappears and does not re-emerge for about four years.
1959 – Utica Newspapers win the Pulitzer Prize for meritorious public service for coverage of the organized crime investigations and of corruption in Utica city government.
1961 – A series of convictions related to the state investigations culminates with a jury finding former Utica Deputy Police Chief Vincent Fiore guilty of taking protection money from a brothel owner. In all, 22 people were convicted and nine public officials resigned or were removed because of the probes.
1963 – Convicted murderer and dope peddler Joseph Valachi testifies to a U.S. Senate committee that there were “80 to 100” members of the Mafia in Utica. He also testifies he had met Salvatore Falcone in Utica during a rumpus over a dice game in the 1930s. Valachi’s testimony helps build public understanding of how the shadowy underworld of organized crime had operated for decades.
1970 – Bill Conley is blown up in his car near Mr. Joe’s Restaurant in South Utica. He had been a business partner of a man named Al Marrone.
1972 – Salvatore Falcone dies in Miami, where he had spent much of his time over the previous few decades.
1976 – Marrone dies after being ambushed in a shootout that left bullet holes in nearby houses along Kathleen Street.
1983 – Three people are murdered in the first month of the year, including attorney Joseph Dacquino, an associate of attorney Louis Brindisi who was killed inside Brindisi’s South Utica offices. Brindisi had defended figures linked to organized crime. Later that year, other violence would occur in Utica, including the bombing of a house.
1990 – Several men are convicted of racketeering over a period between 1973 and 1989. Crimes cited in the federal trial included Marrone’s homicide.
1992 – Joseph Falcone dies.
Moronic; how about the Spanish Inquisition?
Insider

New York, NY

#7 Dec 3, 2012
Born in Castellammare del Golfo, Sicily, Magaddino emigrated to the United States in 1909 and settled in Brooklyn, New York. One of Magadinno's cousins from Sicily was Joseph Bonanno, the future boss of the Bonanno crime family in New York City, the family Magaddino would leave behind. In 1921, in Avon, New Jersey, Magaddino was arrested for his involvement in the murder of Pietro "Don Petrino" Caiozzo, a member of the rival Buccellato clan from Castellammare del Golfo.
Buffalo crime family
Magaddino eventually moved to Niagara Falls, New York, then in later years further north to Lewiston, another town on the Niagara River facing the Canadian border. Although he was a successful mortician operating his legitimate Magaddino Memorial Chapel funeral home business in Niagara Falls, with Prohibition in effect in the United States, Maggadino made his real money running a profitable bootlegging business by smuggling wine and spirits across the Niagara River into New York State, thereby supplying the needs of speakeasies located in Buffalo and the very "Honky-tonk" destination Niagara Falls was for tourists and visitors. After Prohibition ended, Magaddino and his crime family made their money by means of loan sharking, illegal gambling, extortion, carjacking and labor racketeering as well as other legitimate lucrative businesses such as linen service businesses that served the needs of most of the hotels located throughout the region as well as taxicab companies and other service oriented businesses.
Magaddino's crime family held power in the underworld territories of Upstate and Western New York, namely, Buffalo, New York, bordering Canada and situated on Lake Erie, Rochester and Utica, along the Mohawk River as far east as Amsterdam, New York; from Eastern Pennsylvania as far west as Youngstown, Ohio, and in Canada from Fort Erie (opposite Buffalo, NY) to Toronto, Ontario as far north as Montreal, Quebec. Magaddino led his Buffalo family through its glory years and its most powerful and profitable era in La Cosa Nostra. He was an old-style boss who preferred to stay in the background and not draw any attention to himself or his criminal activities if possible. Due to his territory's remoteness yet the vast amount of it he controlled and being geographically insulated from the inter-family squabbles of the New York City-based families, he was held in high regard and was at times called upon to be an arbiter involving territorial disputes between crime families based there.
National crime figure
For fifty years, Magaddino was a dominant presence in the Buffalo underworld. He was the longest tenured boss in the history of the American Mafia. Magaddino was also very involved in national La Cosa Nostra affairs. Magaddino was a charter member of Charles "Lucky" Luciano's Mafia Commission and attended important underworld summits such as the 1946 Havana Conference and the 1957 Apalachin Conference.
Insider

New York, NY

#8 Dec 3, 2012
Joseph Falcone was a favorite of Stefano Magaddino,Buffalo, who he reported to. Magaddino is one of the most powerful men in the history of the Mafia and the longest reigning Don in it's history, 50 years. JF yielded regional power because of his relationship with Magaddino. When Magaddino had to go underground, he entrusted his entire enterprise solely in the hands of Joseph Falcone, this is not known in most circles. Utica and Joseph Falcone wielded much more power in La Cosa Nostra than is known.
Insider

New York, NY

#9 Dec 3, 2012
Stay with this, you will get a true history of the Utica Mafia. Feel free to ask questions and if I can answer them factually I will. The term Mafia was used primarily in Sicily to describe organized crime. In the United States it is called La Cosa Nostra " this thing of ours" to seperate from the Sicilian Mafia.
ron

Utica, NY

#10 Dec 3, 2012
Insider wrote:
Stay with this, you will get a true history of the Utica Mafia. Feel free to ask questions and if I can answer them factually I will. The term Mafia was used primarily in Sicily to describe organized crime. In the United States it is called La Cosa Nostra " this thing of ours" to seperate from the Sicilian Mafia.
How about the question I already asked?
Insider

New York, NY

#11 Dec 3, 2012
The answer is obvious, to those that know the family, I will leave it at that.
nrafan

Clinton, NY

#12 Dec 3, 2012
APRIL1966 wrote:
Just goes to show you how much the Italians have ruined this city.
Actually, you are wrong. The downfall of Utica came when the Mafia no longer ran the city. Personally, would love to have the old ways back.
Insider

New York, NY

#13 Dec 3, 2012
nrafan wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually, you are wrong. The downfall of Utica came when the Mafia no longer ran the city. Personally, would love to have the old ways back.
nrafan, there is a lot more truth to what you say than you know. All the major industry GE, BENDIX, SPERRY RAND, UNIVAC, MVCC, UTICA COLLEGE ETC, ETC. Who you think brought FDR, JFK, Rockefeller, to Utica when they were running for President? Utica had direct ties to the White House through 1964.
sad

Cambridge, MA

#14 Dec 3, 2012
I grew up in east utica and till this day I don't understand why people try to glamorize people who robbed, stole from hard working people and murdered people. They were THUGS and the so called thing of theirs is bull crap in the end they all RAT each other out
sad

Cambridge, MA

#15 Dec 3, 2012
Insider wrote:
<quoted text> nrafan, there is a lot more truth to what you say than you know. All the major industry GE, BENDIX, SPERRY RAND, UNIVAC, MVCC, UTICA COLLEGE ETC, ETC. Who you think brought FDR, JFK, Rockefeller, to Utica when they were running for President? Utica had direct ties to the White House through 1964.
Dirty politicians chased more business away from utica than you will ever know including route81. They padded their pockets with backdoor deals on land they owned at the expense of progress
funny

Cambridge, MA

#16 Dec 3, 2012
sad wrote:
I grew up in east utica and till this day I don't understand why people try to glamorize people who robbed, stole from hard working people and murdered people. They were THUGS and the so called thing of theirs is bull crap in the end they all RAT each other out
Sounds like the founding principles of the Democratic party of today ROB and STEAL from hard working people and deamonize them
Insider

New York, NY

#17 Dec 3, 2012
funny wrote:
<quoted text>Sounds like the founding principles of the Democratic party of today ROB and STEAL from hard working people and deamonize them
Route 81 for Utica was a bad idea. Look at a map. Now please stick to the topic.
old utica

Hamilton, NY

#18 Dec 4, 2012
sad wrote:
I grew up in east utica and till this day I don't understand why people try to glamorize people who robbed, stole from hard working people and murdered people. They were THUGS and the so called thing of theirs is bull crap in the end they all RAT each other out
there was more to it than that, those were the crimes done by the low lifes and degenerates, that were looking for quick easy money, i think you must be remembering the wanna bes like cuda and his cronies, this guy is talking about the real days, my grandfather had a hand in the booze part of things back in the 30s

Level 2

Since: Jul 09

Location hidden

#19 Dec 4, 2012
What was the relationship between Joseph falcone and Rufie Elefante.
YEsSir

Carthage, NY

#20 Dec 4, 2012
I believe I've heard that Rufie and Falcone were friends and did work tgoether here and there but nothing too serious. Rufie was a very smart guy when it came to politics and walked a fine line.

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