marcy deerfield youth sports
First Prev
of 2
Next Last
Competition is good

Watertown, NY

#22 Jul 7, 2010
I bet wrote:
I stand by my opinion that kids will learn more about how things are done in life if they have less adult supervision at play. Parents should be teaching their children about right and wrong, disappointment, etc. But kids will never learn how the game is really played until they interact with their peers. Competition is great, then little league comes along and dashes their hopes. AYSO rules are such that everyone coming out will play at least 1 quarter of the game, and the kids are not stuck in one position.
I agree that kids need to kids first. Their growth is in direct proportion to their experiences. As for organized sports (or any organized activity for that matter) kids need the direction and discipline. You may be aware the Little League has extablished minimum play time for all player (6 defensive outs and 1 at bat). Our local league rules require that all kids play 3 complete innings. All kids develop at differently. LL heroes don't always make varsity heroes.
One question

Rome, NY

#23 Jul 7, 2010
What was the score of that championship game? Just curious.
one answer

Watertown, NY

#24 Jul 8, 2010
One question wrote:
What was the score of that championship game? Just curious.
Not completely certain - NH 16 - MD 8
lol

New Hartford, NY

#25 Jul 8, 2010
New hartford has 10, 11 yr olds mostly. Of course they will win. that head coach is a prick also. what a mouth. I almost jumed the fence and cracked him. Even marcy, mostly older kids more on the 10 side.
I bet

Utica, NY

#26 Jul 8, 2010
The last I heard, kids going out for Little League still face a myriad of disappointments such as:

1. two friends go out for the same team, one gets cut or traded and his friend gets to play.

2. if a kid gets cut, he has very little chance to play somewhere else. causes low self esteem

3. I he gets traded, he is not good enough to be with his friend. causes low self esteem

Let them play organized sports in school where the good coaches are trained to let them down easy.

In the past, the "experts" in child development were against organized sports. Instead they encouraged participation in Scouting , etc.
competition is good

Watertown, NY

#27 Jul 8, 2010
I bet wrote:
The last I heard, kids going out for Little League still face a myriad of disappointments such as:
1. two friends go out for the same team, one gets cut or traded and his friend gets to play.
2. if a kid gets cut, he has very little chance to play somewhere else. causes low self esteem
3. I he gets traded, he is not good enough to be with his friend. causes low self esteem
Let them play organized sports in school where the good coaches are trained to let them down easy.
In the past, the "experts" in child development were against organized sports. Instead they encouraged participation in Scouting , etc.
I appreciate your points.
I don't think any kids ever showed up for tryouts with a friend and expected to be drafted on the same team. If they did, perhaps their parents should help the kids with their expectations. That just won't happen.
If a child gets cut (again the parents could help)they will go back to their Minor League team where they can continue to further develop and most likely get more play time at a level of play that will give them a greater chance to succeed.
Trades are really the exception, not the rule. Rarely happen.
Isn't that why America is great? Baseball isn't for everyone and scouting provides kids with another option.
As for the experts..........LL has theirs as well. Why would you suggest getting cut by school team is less traumatic? Same age, same sport, same pain. My experience has tought me kids are typically a lot smarter and a lot more resilient than adults give them credit for. The kids want to play, compete, and win. They should! Final thought - self esteem is developed at home. Parents need to accept responsibility for their own childs development.
jack3d

United States

#28 Jul 9, 2010
Is it true they split brothers and put them on two different teams (one was a stronger player than the other)? Not sure how true that rumor is, but that's gotta make it difficult for parents.
I bet

Utica, NY

#29 Jul 9, 2010
I thought LL was for kids under 12 - 13 while HS sports are for 15 and up. I think that High Schoolers are more mature and are more cognizant of their capabilities. My oldest brother was a HS coach and he had a great disdain for LL, etc. because many of the volunteer coaches were not well-versed in the sport they were involved in. He used to say that a lot of his coaching time was spent having kids unlearn bad habits. I would tag him as an expert in this field as he graduated in the top 5 from Ithaca College's Phys. Ed. program where he played soccer, baseball, ran track & field and wrestled. He also played lacrosse and football on intra mural sports teams. I'm not going to tell you what year, as I respect his privacy. He coached HS wrestling, football and track during his career. I know that there are a few decent volunteer coaches out there, but most of those are involved in Legion Ball. I grew up in a time when LL was just getting started, though I didn't play in LL, I was part of sandlot teams that usually beat the LLs. Our pitcher was one of the best around because he was taught by one of the old Press League's best and his brother, who used to get paid to pitch in the BRV league Boonville and north).
times change

Watertown, NY

#30 Jul 13, 2010
I bet wrote:
I thought LL was for kids under 12 - 13 while HS sports are for 15 and up. I think that High Schoolers are more mature and are more cognizant of their capabilities. My oldest brother was a HS coach and he had a great disdain for LL, etc. because many of the volunteer coaches were not well-versed in the sport they were involved in. He used to say that a lot of his coaching time was spent having kids unlearn bad habits. I would tag him as an expert in this field as he graduated in the top 5 from Ithaca College's Phys. Ed. program where he played soccer, baseball, ran track & field and wrestled. He also played lacrosse and football on intra mural sports teams. I'm not going to tell you what year, as I respect his privacy. He coached HS wrestling, football and track during his career. I know that there are a few decent volunteer coaches out there, but most of those are involved in Legion Ball. I grew up in a time when LL was just getting started, though I didn't play in LL, I was part of sandlot teams that usually beat the LLs. Our pitcher was one of the best around because he was taught by one of the old Press League's best and his brother, who used to get paid to pitch in the BRV league Boonville and north).
First LL age is 9 to 12
Second school ball begins as early as 12
It's possible that a kid play modified baseball for school and LL.
The volunteers are parents - people from our community that are interested in teaching kids baseball - period. Some are better than others and their professions range from business owners and executives to college coaches and farmers. Some have played division one and some highschool ball. Some teach Gym and some teach Math. It doesn't matter. What hasn't changed is that the best players in LL are the kids that play ball when LL practice is over. As for your brothers destain.....he should try to be a little more understanding. It is what it is.
PS - I learned baseball from my semi pro father and some of his semi pro friends. Congratulations on your sandlot team.
Sal

Lansing, NY

#31 Jun 20, 2011
I grew up in an era (the late 30's and early 40's when Little league was unheard of. A group of kids got together on a field and chose sides. Even the choosing of sides was sometimes an embarassment for the last one picked. There were no spectators at our pickup games, parents had more important things to do such as working, canning preserves, putting clothes through a washer, killing a chicken and defeathering it in boiling hot water. But we coped. There was no umpire, no parents, no coaches and we resolved our questionable calls among ourselves then continued playing. I am torn between strict organizational ball and the free wheeling of my day. I see values and pitfalls in both systems. The ability to resolve problems without the use of force, though upon occasion there was a setto or two taught us an invaluable lesson. With all the complaints about coaches playing their offspring in organized ball most coaches teach skills, backing up, stealing, sliding, not throwing the ball around, keep your head in the game, know where the play is going to be if the ball comes to you. As in everything else in life some coaches are better than others and that is the way of the world. All spend countless hours with their athletes both the good and not so good coaches.
I am still on the horns of a dilemma. I still don't know which
era I prefer. I do get great pleasure out of seeing my grandchildren play, I never carp at an umpire's call nr criicize a coach's decision. It is a game, be thankful you have the time to be a spectator at an event your progeny participate in.
Competition is good wrote:
<quoted text>
I agree that kids need to kids first. Their growth is in direct proportion to their experiences. As for organized sports (or any organized activity for that matter) kids need the direction and discipline. You may be aware the Little League has extablished minimum play time for all player (6 defensive outs and 1 at bat). Our local league rules require that all kids play 3 complete innings. All kids develop at differently. LL heroes don't always make varsity heroes.

Level 1

Since: Aug 09

utica,ny

#32 Jun 21, 2011
How about we don't blame the coaches for our kids not playing ,instead pick up your glove and go out in your back yard and work with your kid instead of relying on anyone else.Work with your kids once in a while so he/she doesn't need to rely on anyone else to teach him/her everything that you yourself can help him with,it would mean a whole lot more to your kid that you took the quality time to teach him the game(seeing you don't like the way coaches do it).Then there would be no excuses as to why your kid is sitting on the pine picking slivers out of his/her little hiney.Take the time to get involved yourselves instead of ripping the people who volunteer to do the coaching so your kids can play the greatest game invented.Get a grip it's minor league and little league the LEARNING years.
old school

Syracuse, NY

#33 Jul 21, 2011
well, I hate to say it, but there is favoritism. Older brother was a star, so younger brother not only makes the team, but starts. Whitesboro had an 8th grader start for JV. Started the season in a horrible slump. Didn't hit very well. But, pretty much started all the time. Booster parents' kids seemed to play all the time too. Coincidence? One kid didn't play, then shined over the summer. That program does find talent, but usually overlooks more than they find. they should give all the kids a chance to play at that level, to see who might be a surprise. Some things never change.
non resident

Dracut, MA

#34 Jul 21, 2011
At least you put good teams on the field. Sauquoit youth sports has bottomed out. Terrible coaching, morons running pop warner that make their friends head coaches. Its no longer about the kids. Just a select few adults pretending to be big shots. Its embarrassing what its become.
wow

New Hartford, NY

#35 Jul 22, 2011
I heard and I am just asking if its true that a marcy kid who is in 7th grade, moved to new hartford with a 95 avg and kept him in 7th grade again for sports. Anyone hear this? Also, another kid from marcy moved to whitesboro. Your not coming over here from another town like some guys and think your going to coach and take over the league.
MYOB

Rome, NY

#36 Jul 22, 2011
A child moved to NH last year school year from Marcy, who happens to be in the 7th grade. He was a very young 7th grader and was held back to the grade he would of been in if he hadnt started school early. You dont have to fail school to retake a class. Many NH students, as well as many other high school students retake a grade when they transfer out of their local high school and attend a prep school. NH is lucky that this kid is also a good athlete. Don't complain, unless it is your kid who will not make the school team. As we know, this kid will make the school team. We wish he would have transfered to our school district.
lol

Whitesboro, NY

#37 Jul 28, 2011
You are in 7th grade, you arent retaking a class, your retakin a GRADE!!! I know lots of kids that start early, that is because the child is advanced mentally and physically. I cannot believe parents would to another district and repeat 7th grade!!!
It is all for sports. who do u think you are?

Oh, held back to the grade he would of been in had he not started early? Duh, no kiddin. He is use to his own grade. Leave it to marcy!!
from marcy

Whitesboro, NY

#38 Jun 26, 2014
ted wrote:
It is always amusing to me that certain parents rub elbows with the coach to make their child a starter
yes BC and AC

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 2
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Utica Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
losing best weather man on WKTV 1 min Steve 4
wktv 4 min Steve 2
Recommendations for a Veterinarian in Utica area 6 hr Chocolate Lab 1
new pizza place jonnys pizza 8 hr lets get them not... 5
gooch'S pond 8 hr donny c 1
Aqua Vino Review 9 hr Interesting 21
Utica Is a Great Place to Find a Job! 10 hr Stars4 40
Ironic Nano news announced before elections 15 hr Echo 65
Ocean Blue restaurat 19 hr Gaggy 23
Jill Reale of WKTV (Jan '09) Mon Diction 252
More from around the web

Personal Finance

Utica Mortgages