Modular Homes
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George

Manlius, NY

#1 Apr 27, 2010
Where is the best place to purchase a modular home. G&I, American Homes, a dealer that sells Bill Lake Homes ect...Any feedback is appreciated.
David Hewes

Columbus, GA

#3 Apr 28, 2010
Great o “Off site built homes are becoming the wave of the future.‘We use the latest technology and only the finest building materials to construct our precision-built quality homes,’ says builder/CEO of BSN, Grant Smereczynsky.‘We also combine the efficiency of assembly line effectiveness with that of skilled tradesmen to make sure your home is completed on time, on budget and without delays!’‘We have now made Gainesville, Georgia our national showplace.’

BSN helps builders from Maine to Florida better understand this product and it is growing larger week by week.‘Our new design center staff has over 75 years combined experience in home building and let’s not forget the savings of our 80/20 program that is great for those do-it-yourselfers,’ Smereczynsky continued.

This is an industry first; now let’s do some fact or fiction comparisons:

FACT: BSN adheres to the same strict codes used on building site built homes. In fact Building Systems Network homes are in many ways built to an even higher standard being constructed in a state-of-the-art facility.

FICTION: Off site built homes are lower quality than site built homes. The truth is quite the opposite. Every BSN home is subjected to multiple rigorous quality-control inspections. We can even build your home to meet EPA’s Energy Star specifications.

FACT: BSN builds with only the best-known name brands. Industry leaders such as GE, Delta, Johns Manville, and Owens Corning are used to build our homes. Your home is outfitted with only the best.

FICTION: All off site built homes are built the same. BSN offers a variety of distinct styles: Ranch, Cape Cod, Cottages, 2 Story’s, as well as custom options. All of our floor plans are flexible, so your space is exactly the way you want it.

BSN offers a wide selection of award-winning designs that fits nearly any lifestyle or need. Just as you would with any other new home, you’ll be able to chose cabinets, countertops, flooring and other options, plus you have your choice of many different styles and floor plans, as well as custom designs and multi-family duplexes.

So, if you’re thinking about having a new home built, trust in the expertise behind the Building Systems Network with over 75 years of combined experience, convenience, and flexibility to home building - without sacrificing quality.

Building Systems Network are the future of home building. We can help you build the home you want, at the price you can afford.”

www.buildingsystemsnetwork.com
BSN Builder

Columbus, GA

#4 Apr 28, 2010
Our livelihood depends on our commitment to our home buyers network and our ability to build a quality home for our customers. We strive to make loyal customers who will pass on appreciation of their home to their friends and family.

While we cannot build a "perfect" home, we will not forget that a house is built by wise planning & loyal service so that those who will call it their "home" will find a quality engineered, visually appealing safe and secure place to live.

Communication between Building Systems Network, its builder and employees, the customer and all those helping to make the building of each home possible, is an important link to each customer's satisfaction with their home.

Part of our mission is to create an environment where Building Systems Network employees and those assisting us, can take pride in each and every home built.

Building Systems Network is committed to building a faster, stronger and better home passing on cost and time savings to each person purchasing a home from us.
Fritos

West Chazy, NY

#5 Apr 28, 2010
G & I

2 story mod here. No issues what so ever. 2 1/2 months from starting the cellar to move in. 5 years and a-ok. Great quality too.
Fritos

West Chazy, NY

#7 Apr 29, 2010
wide load wrote:
Modulars are ugly and non-contemporary, basically rectangle or square-shaped boxes with a roof. They are structurally weak and shake when you walk around in them. 90 percent of the houses in New Hartford are modulars.
Hate to tell you wide load, thats not the case. Get your facts straight. Maybe thats how it is in your trailer park.
I Know

New York, NY

#8 Apr 29, 2010
Actually modulars need to be built stronger to withstand being shipped over the road and lifted by crane. Try lifting a stick built home!

I've lived in one for 20 years and I can tell you they don't shake or sound hollow when you walk. You might have double wides and modulars mixed up.
Sue

Manlius, NY

#9 May 2, 2010
The Bill Lake Home is a modular home, and I consider it to be compareable or even better than a stick built home. Go take a tour of their plant in Sprakers, and then u'll say the same....guaranteed!!
Charles

Manlius, NY

#10 May 4, 2010
Modulars are the way to go. They are just as good as a stick built home, if not better, and don't cost as much.
Larry

Watertown, NY

#11 May 9, 2010
why would you want to buy a modular, they never increase in value. they only depreciate like a car, buy or build a real house something that will actually gain value in the coming years
On the Moon

New York, NY

#12 May 9, 2010
Larry wrote:
why would you want to buy a modular, they never increase in value. they only depreciate like a car, buy or build a real house something that will actually gain value in the coming years
Where do you come up with that? Do you even know what a modular is? We're not talking trailers or double wides shit for brains!
Snowey

Reidsville, NC

#13 May 9, 2010
Here's a picture of a modular home. Looks pretty damn nice to me! http://www.the-homestore.com/galleries/2story...

Don't confuse single and double wides for modular homes.
Euorgos

AOL

#14 May 9, 2010
Modular homes are low class, trashy garbage. The only reason anyone would piss away money for one is because they are too cheap to buy a real house. Why live in a house with paper thin walls and garden hose plumbing? Funny how it seems like the ones saying positive things about them are also the ones who sell them. These kinds of houses are nothing more than glorified trailers.
Sounds like

San Mateo, CA

#15 May 10, 2010
Euorgos wrote:
Modular homes are low class, trashy garbage. The only reason anyone would piss away money for one is because they are too cheap to buy a real house. Why live in a house with paper thin walls and garden hose plumbing? Funny how it seems like the ones saying positive things about them are also the ones who sell them. These kinds of houses are nothing more than glorified trailers.
you're the type that spends a great deal of time talking out your ass. I'll bet you have zero credibility among friends and family. What an ignorant poster. I own a modular. It's a center hall colonial. All of the wood cuts are done by a single saw from CAD program CD and all are within a blade-width of accuracy. Find me a contractor that will make me that same guarantee on a stick-built.
You Nailed It

New York, NY

#16 May 10, 2010
Sounds like wrote:
<quoted text>
you're the type that spends a great deal of time talking out your ass. I'll bet you have zero credibility among friends and family. What an ignorant poster. I own a modular.
I also own a modular. Nuff said to the ignorant one!
Bob Villa

United States

#17 May 11, 2010
Modulars have come a long way from being the rickety pieces of shit they were 20 years ago. I built a house a couple of years ago, and was originally going to go the modular route, but decided against it because my building site had a steep hill and a curving switchback that a modular wouldn't go up.
One of the other issues I had was the salesman at American homes was a little pushy, kept wanting me to put a deposit down before their site people even went to my site to let us know whether the house was deliverable or not.
Also, friend of a friend had an experience with G&I that he had the basement in place and the house was supposed to be delivered so they could be in by Thanksgiving. They were lucky to get in by Easter the following year. Not sure if that was an isolated incident, but it caused a real shitstorm with the bank financing. Bottom line, do lots of homework!
Veronica

New York, NY

#18 May 11, 2010
I built a modular home 1 year ago and am very happy with it. It has been assessed at 250K.The biggest stressors have been the added cost of landscaping(grading the land and seeding it), having to add gutters later, adding a driveway, not having a deck or porch yet, having only primer on the walls, no storm door. With stick built homes the builder will usually include these things.I also had to obtain the building permit myself($500.) pay extra for basement stairs($500)and trash removal($500). I was naive and my builder failed to mention all these extra costs with going modular.
Pat Wilson

Peachtree City, GA

#19 Jun 15, 2010
We have one of the Chatham Modular Homes by http://www.suitshomes.com and we just love it. We save money in production and have just as quality as a foundation as our neighbors.*definitely a good investment.

Level 1

Since: Aug 09

Pine Island, NY

#20 Jun 16, 2010
Bob Villa wrote:
Modulars have come a long way from being the rickety pieces of shit they were 20 years ago. I built a house a couple of years ago, and was originally going to go the modular route, but decided against it because my building site had a steep hill and a curving switchback that a modular wouldn't go up.
One of the other issues I had was the salesman at American homes was a little pushy, kept wanting me to put a deposit down before their site people even went to my site to let us know whether the house was deliverable or not.
Also, friend of a friend had an experience with G&I that he had the basement in place and the house was supposed to be delivered so they could be in by Thanksgiving. They were lucky to get in by Easter the following year. Not sure if that was an isolated incident, but it caused a real shitstorm with the bank financing. Bottom line, do lots of homework!
We've been in our Modular for 5 years now, came from American Homes. Generally have few complaints about it. Built as good or better than stick built, they are built under controlled conditions and are subject to constant inspections. Too many stick built contractors are trying to cut corners to put an extra buck in their pocket. We had the same delivery problem as described by Bob Villa, our house was scheduled to be built when Katrina hit. All manufactured homes went to the victims of Katrina. We were supposed to be in our home by Thanksgiving and got in Mid April. As a result our basement that was ready to receive the house in October suffered some cracking from sitting all winter w/o heat or a building on it. Caused extra financing expenses as well because we didn't complete the construction on time.
I suggest you make sure you get everything in writing and Signed. We ordered Oak Trim and got cheap White imitation wood trim instead. Ordered 24 inch linen closet and got 18 inch. ordered Anderson windows and got some cheap Barrier windows that now have some type of film they have flaking off. Unfortunately we didn't have the extra time or money to fight them to get it all fixed.

I will say that American Homes did not come through on fixing any of these errors and once they had the money they just stopped returning our calls.
bsnbuilder

Norcross, GA

#21 Jul 29, 2010
Considering modular
One potential solution to these challenges that generally overlook is modular housing.

Modular — or systems built — housing has been around for more than a century. With modular, individual modules are built off-site in a factory to the specifications of the builder or architect. When complete, the newly constructed residences are transported and put in place.

The two primary advantages to this approach are cost and completion time. If properly designed and constructed, modular housing can be developed for a fraction of the cost of traditional housing and still meet the highest quality standards. Because all of the project is constructed off-site, the majority of the development process has no physical impact on the jobs site . Once the completed product is transported to the site , the setup can be completed in a matter of days.
Completion speed also can have a huge effect on funding. If a building can be completed in a few months rather than in a year, financing costs can be reduced, and funding can be obtained more readily.
For mor great tips on Modular Building Systems check at www.buildingsystemsnetwork.com
Do your research

Brooklyn, NY

#22 Nov 2, 2010
Hope people aren't offened but... we are very unhappy with our G&I Home. Low quality materials and really "creay." Service Techs they sent seemed shady and the warranty is horrible (you'll have problems long after it's over)! Maybe check out American Homes, I've heard good things!

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