Daughter to sue nursing home over mom...

Daughter to sue nursing home over mom's death -- Trials

There are 33 comments on the Chicago Tribune story from Apr 7, 2008, titled Daughter to sue nursing home over mom's death -- Trials. In it, Chicago Tribune reports that:

The daughter of a Woodstock nursing home resident whose suspicious death in 2006 was among those at the center of an Illinois State Police investigation plans to file a negligence lawsuit this week seeking ...

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mulligan

Schaumburg, IL

#2 Apr 7, 2008
Is this suit not a bit premature? No one has pleaded guilty nor has anyone been convicted of the charges. I'm sorry for your loss but it seems a little early in the game. This does tend to make it appear that monetary gain and not closure or vindication is what you are after.
AuntieTeeTee

AOL

#3 Apr 7, 2008
Money,Money,Money---the "Root of all
Evil" This family seems to only want
money!!! My dad has been in a nursing
home for almost 16 months now in
Oakbrook, IL---it is one of the most
cleanest and caring nursing homes, I
have been in, but, you still have to
make sure that you make a point of
going to visit and observe what is
happening with the resident while they
are living there. We attend careplan
meetings every 2 months with the heads
of the different departmens and are
always up to date on his condition.
Just because someone is in a nursing
home, the family still has to be
responsible to check on the well-being
of that person. Everyone wants to get
their hands on others money--even if
it is at the expense of their parents.
Law suits have just gotten out of hand!!!

Since: Feb 08

Coal City, IL

#4 Apr 7, 2008
Yep, suing will make everything better. And the purpose of suing in this case is what? Their mother's death is probably saving them money. Now they want to sue the nursing home and take money that would go towards the care of those left?

Maybe this family can hire one of the poor lawyers that the other article in the Trib talked about.
pep

Rolling Meadows, IL

#5 Apr 7, 2008
what do you expect? money can not buy love.....
there would be no problem if the daughter did not give away her own mother ......
nurse-guilty, but the daughter ..also guilty.... maybe her child would send her to nursing home and history goes on and on..
Done

Lisle, IL

#6 Apr 7, 2008
What took them so long????? She was 78yrs si what kind of damages can they be sueing for????
Now and days everyone sues.. What a joke. And if thier was nothing wrong why was she in the home????
Kevin

AOL

#8 Apr 7, 2008
To answer your question, Mulligan, NO this suit is NOT premature. The death occurred in 2006. There is a two-year statute of limitations to file an action for negligence or wrongful death. If the family waited any longer, they would waive their right to sue.

All of you "anti-lawsuit" people would be singing a different tune if your mother or grandmother died in a nursing home due to someone else's gross negligence or incompetence. The amount of abuse and neglect that goes on in our nursing homes is shocking, and holding them accountable for the damages they cause is the only way it will change.
Case Lucane

Hammond, IN

#9 Apr 7, 2008
Could not agree more, but, go ahead and try to prove it.
Been there

Grand Blanc, MI

#10 Apr 7, 2008
Note to Blithere and Pep - Get off your high horse and do not judge children whose parents are in nursing homes. A parent may need much more skilled care than the any of the children can provide. If a parent dies while in their child's care, people would suspect the child of not taking proper care or even neglect. Nursing homes are not the best solution - Kevin is right many nursing homes are terrible places. Many are for profit and are deliberately understaffed so the owners can make more money, and the patients spend their days in lined up in wheelchairs in front of the nursing station because there isn't enough staff to give them the attention they need. Even the not for profit nursing homes can be awful. Our medicare system that has created much of the problem, as it will pay for nursing homes, but not for care by a licensed professional in a family home or in an assisted living facility. Assisted living facilities treat their residents with respect and the residents can live semi-independently, providing them with some measure of dignity. You can only protect your parent from bad nursing homes by investigating them first, visiting frequently and speaking up when you see something is not right.
Mike

Melrose Park, IL

#11 Apr 7, 2008
mulligan wrote:
Is this suit not a bit premature? No one has pleaded guilty nor has anyone been convicted of the charges. I'm sorry for your loss but it seems a little early in the game. This does tend to make it appear that monetary gain and not closure or vindication is what you are after.
Trust me, there is an ambulance chasing lawyer involved.
judy

Naperville, IL

#12 Apr 7, 2008
The daughters did complain and tried to intervene as the mom was all doped up so she wouldn't be demanding and staff could ignore her. This happens very often in nursing homes, I've seen the data.if staff can get away with it, and no one puts a stop to it. You readers who think it's about money or lack of lovr could be next. You could be in an acident and need special care an a nursing home as a disabled person.
In doubt

Chicago, IL

#13 Apr 7, 2008
"A talkative, joyful woman who enjoyed life" does not describe an Alzheimer's patient. That might have been her description a few years ago.

Like the above Judy notes, this was probably a loud and agitated patient (which does describe an Alzheimer's patient). The staff likely doped her as a coping measure.
Justine

Chicago, IL

#14 Apr 7, 2008
If it's found that the woman od'd on morphine, is that not justifable to sue? Wouldn't that be murder instead of negligence? Or at least manslaughter?
Justine

Chicago, IL

#15 Apr 7, 2008
In doubt wrote:
"A talkative, joyful woman who enjoyed life" does not describe an Alzheimer's patient. That might have been her description a few years ago.
Like the above Judy notes, this was probably a loud and agitated patient (which does describe an Alzheimer's patient). The staff likely doped her as a coping measure.
But you don't "dope" them on morphine.

Since: Feb 08

Coal City, IL

#16 Apr 8, 2008
All you who say suing is justified here's a question: What good will it do?

If these women are prosecuted and spend time in jail what are you getting out of a lawsuit?

Get over the suing all the time. The only person it benefits are the lawyers and your own greedy selves.
chan ho

Schiller Park, IL

#17 Apr 8, 2008
CHA-CHING!! I'm not trying to say the nursing home was not at fault, but the best way to ensure against frivolous lawsuits is to have ALL monetary awards go directly to charity. 10% to the lawyer, not the usual 33-50%. The only award to the plaintif would be if they could prove an actual damage or loss. I know those left behind are in deep sorrow, especially if there was some neglegence, but this should not be a vehichle for a huge payday.
brittany

Charlottesville, VA

#18 Oct 10, 2008
I have seen nursing home abuse and neglect involving a family member, I have also seen what the patient's last days on earth are like. No one should have to be allowed to suffer from pain and abuse at the facility that has been entrusted with your loved one.

You can visit daily and spend hours, it doesn't always prevent the abuse and neglect, in this case, it was at night. The patient was allowed to suffer, scream, and beg for help to only be told by diffent employees to be quiet, you're fine, etc., No doctor, family member, or hospice was even called to ease the patient's suffering.

I can definately see suing in some cases, especially like this one. When it's your parent who's suffered unncessarily and been the victim of abuse, the nursing facility should be held accountable, and if it takes a lawsuit to wake them up and termintate the employees involved, then it should be done. This could save patients down the road from having to endure the abuse and neglect. It's not always about profiting from a parents death. I don't think anyone thinks that far ahead as to profit when their parent dies, but if the administration of the nursing facility is not staying on top of the patients treatment
it's their fault. They can't just all come in everyday Mon-Fri and work their 9-5 hours without at least unannounced visits on the second and third shifts to ensure that the patients are being taken care of. That's why this continues to happen. Administration has to stay on top of the employees they hire and continually follow up on the patients to ensure they are receving the proper care.
Marie

Skokie, IL

#19 Oct 14, 2008
where is the rest of this article?
Marie

Skokie, IL

#20 Oct 14, 2008
Done wrote:
What took them so long????? She was 78yrs si what kind of damages can they be sueing for????
Now and days everyone sues.. What a joke. And if thier was nothing wrong why was she in the home????
Who the hell taught you how to spell?

Since: Sep 08

AOL

#21 Oct 20, 2008
A woman died in a nursing home and all you people can complain about is the fact that family is suing?!?! You say that the money could be better spent on taking care of the others in the nursing home rather than go to one undeserving family?!?! Why? SO the nursing home can abuse MORE people?! You are ridiculous! THINK about what you are saying here. If you do not sue the nursing home, they will go on and continue to commit horrible acts against someone else's family member. If these people were actually 8 year olds in a classroom being abused by their teacher you would sue immediately!!! WIthout thinking twice.

The nursing home should be shut down and everyone's license's revoked; never to be given back - in any state. Even if ONE person committed abuse, everyone else who worked there must have condoned it to. THey kept silent and did NOTHING for the victim - who eventually died. Such a despicable place should not be allowed to continue to run. It's a living hell - would you put YOUR loved one there?
boo

Placentia, Canada

#22 Mar 10, 2009
Justine wrote:
<quoted text>
But you don't "dope" them on morphine.
Exactly... there is a zero tolerance policy which doesn't allow chemical of physical restraints although we can blame the shortage of nurses for the reason these restraints are used... chemical ( meds) so that they can tend to other patients and not have to deal with trying to keep someone in there chair or from climbing bed rails.. physical restraints are like babysitters... they feel that as long as they are strapped in there not going to go anywhres and the workers feel that they can go about doing whatever....

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