Abalone diver drowns off Little River...

Abalone diver drowns off Little River coast

There are 56 comments on the The Ukiah Daily Journal story from Oct 11, 2010, titled Abalone diver drowns off Little River coast. In it, The Ukiah Daily Journal reports that:

On Sunday, Oct. 10 at approximately 3 p.m. the Mendocino County Sheriff's Office received a report of an abalone diving accident in Spring Grove Cove in Little River.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Ukiah Daily Journal.

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Sharkbait

Dixon, CA

#1 Oct 12, 2010
Diving is a hard core sport
Yo mamma

San Francisco, CA

#2 Oct 12, 2010
Yes it is Sharkbait.
Nicholas Wilson

United States

#3 Oct 12, 2010
I was very sorry to learn that the victim did not survive despite the efforts of a couple of dozen people to rescue him and save his life.

I got news action photos of the rescue team bringing the victim to shore with jet skis and trying to resuscitate him, but the newspaper was too cheap to pay anything for using them. I've been a professional documentary photographer on the Mendocino Coast for 40 years, and have sold photos to the NY Times, Christian Science Monitor, SF Chronicle, the Santa Rosa Press Democrat and many more newspapers and magazines. But they wouldn't even trade for ad space, offering only photo credit, like I was a high school student just starting out as a photographer. No thanks, cheapskates!
Nicholas Wilson

United States

#4 Oct 12, 2010
Correction: the location was Spring Ranch, not Spring Grove, which is miles down the coast.

The victim was recovered using jet skis operated by a four person water rescue team from Mendocino Volunteer Fire Dept. A Calstar helicopter air ambulance also responded, and the Calstar medic team led the effort to resuscitate, also riding with the victim to the hospital in the hospital's ambulance.

Diver drownings are all too frequent, with roughly half a dozen losing their lives every year on the Mendocino Coast in pursuit of the savory sea snail. Most often, the victims have traveled a long way, and decide to dive even when they find unsafe conditions. It's a dangerous gamble, and too many lose their lives.

The second most frequent drowning scenario here is when people go too close to the cliffs' edge or out on low-lying rocks to see and enjoy the ocean. Many have been swept off the rocks by rogue waves because they have placed themselves in a dangerous place and not paid attention to the approaching waves.

The moral is never turn your back on the ocean. It's beautiful, but it can kill you quickly if you don't take care.

By the way, this newspaper chain was too cheap to pay for my professional news photos of the incident, but I will donate them to the fire department.
kungfoo

San Lorenzo, CA

#5 Oct 12, 2010
Nicholas Wilson wrote:
I was very sorry to learn that the victim did not survive despite the efforts of a couple of dozen people to rescue him and save his life.
I got news action photos of the rescue team bringing the victim to shore with jet skis and trying to resuscitate him, but the newspaper was too cheap to pay anything for using them. I've been a professional documentary photographer on the Mendocino Coast for 40 years, and have sold photos to the NY Times, Christian Science Monitor, SF Chronicle, the Santa Rosa Press Democrat and many more newspapers and magazines. But they wouldn't even trade for ad space, offering only photo credit, like I was a high school student just starting out as a photographer. No thanks, cheapskates!
If you think you deserve sympathy because you could not make some money off this poor person's death, you are one SICK individual. Most of the rescuers were volunteers, maybe they should try to get money out of their honorable rescue attempts too. NO, that would be a nasty, sick thing to do. What a poor excuse for a human being.
mendodiver

United States

#6 Oct 12, 2010
did some diving on sat. water was perfect , funny how fast conditions change out there.

R.I.P bud.
Lauren Yee

Berkeley, CA

#7 Oct 12, 2010
His name was Beldon Yee and he has been diving for over 30 years. Also, the witness, my Dad's dive partner, said that he saw my dad floating face down in the water after last seeing him two hours later. So either he was lying to you or us, or you got that information wrong.
Lauren Yee

Berkeley, CA

#8 Oct 12, 2010
Mr. Wilson,

I'm Beldon's daughter. Could you send me the pictures of the rescue efforts? I'm not sure I'm ready to look at them yet, but I'd like to have them. If you say yes, I'll figure some way to get you my email that doesn't involve posting it on a website like this. I'll also try looking you up in the white pages.

Lauren Yee
Diver's Daughter
Nicholas Wilson wrote:
Correction: the location was Spring Ranch, not Spring Grove, which is miles down the coast.
The victim was recovered using jet skis operated by a four person water rescue team from Mendocino Volunteer Fire Dept. A Calstar helicopter air ambulance also responded, and the Calstar medic team led the effort to resuscitate, also riding with the victim to the hospital in the hospital's ambulance.
Diver drownings are all too frequent, with roughly half a dozen losing their lives every year on the Mendocino Coast in pursuit of the savory sea snail. Most often, the victims have traveled a long way, and decide to dive even when they find unsafe conditions. It's a dangerous gamble, and too many lose their lives.
The second most frequent drowning scenario here is when people go too close to the cliffs' edge or out on low-lying rocks to see and enjoy the ocean. Many have been swept off the rocks by rogue waves because they have placed themselves in a dangerous place and not paid attention to the approaching waves.
The moral is never turn your back on the ocean. It's beautiful, but it can kill you quickly if you don't take care.
By the way, this newspaper chain was too cheap to pay for my professional news photos of the incident, but I will donate them to the fire department.
Koalabear2525

United States

#9 Oct 12, 2010
yes the help at the paper should be able to get names of places right . sorry for the lost of your father,
wangxing

Oakland, CA

#10 Oct 14, 2010
As a journalist the photos should be given to the family as a professional courtesy. The rule is simple. You never ever put on the air or broadcast through written or aired media scenes that are emotionally explosive unless there is a good reason they are to be published. And even before they're put on the air, notification to the public that these are emotionally explicit photographs. That's why there are gatekeepers for the newspapers and television stations. And especially in a case like this where the family is grieving, the last thing they want is to have their dear one's body, face, persona splashed over all the local newspapers and in the press. That's why the newspapers wouldn't buy your photographs. Your lust for greed exceeded your respect for the family and the victim and went beyond the bounds of professional ethics.
Deepest Sympathys

Spring, TX

#11 Oct 14, 2010
Lauren Yee wrote:
His name was Beldon Yee and he has been diving for over 30 years. Also, the witness, my Dad's dive partner, said that he saw my dad floating face down in the water after last seeing him two hours later. So either he was lying to you or us, or you got that information wrong.
Lauren I'm very very sorry for your loss.
Ken Quigley

San Francisco, CA

#12 Oct 14, 2010
I have known Beldon Yee for over 25 years, and have been abalone diving with him on occasion. He was a very experienced and competent diver, who was careful and clear-headed. He was also a very nice person in every way, who will be missed by many, many people at work and in his personal life.

One should not assume that Beldon couldn't resist diving after a long drive, despite bad conditions. He was not the type to do that, and knew that there would always be another day. He had respect for the sea, and knew better than to take chances.

As noted, ab diving is a very dangerous sport. The best of divers can get into trouble through no fault of their own, and the ocean can be very unforgiving. Things happen fast, and a partner is very often unaware that you are in trouble until it is too late.

In this sad situation, perhaps the only positive thing to be said is that Beldon died doing something that he loved to do. That is a gift, although a small consolation to us who will miss him.
Ken Quigley

San Francisco, CA

#13 Oct 14, 2010
BTW, Mr. Wilson, this is a highly inappropriate place to b!tch and moan because someone didn't want to buy your pictures. It's a free country. You were free to sell or not; they were free to buy or not. There are NO grounds for criticism or complaint, so please give it a rest.

Beldon Yee's family and friends have lost a good man. Let's treat that with some respect.
Jayli Miller

Walnut Creek, CA

#14 Oct 14, 2010
I knew Beldon Yee, too, and can attest that he was a grounded, reasonable and centered person. I doubt that any impatience on his part led to diving in unsafe conditions. That would be out of character with his laid-back nature. He was a great person and will be missed very much.
trina ayala

United States

#15 Oct 15, 2010
Beldon was a wonderful man who loved his family. He was laid-back and cool as a cucumber. I had the pleasure of working with him for a few years. He will be missed by many.
Steve Kirby

San Francisco, CA

#16 Oct 16, 2010
I guess the nature of the internet is that everyone's option has a right to be heard. But not only was Bel a very experienced diver, he was a life long practitioner of Wing Chun, a very balanced and centered martial art. The kind of thing movies never portray correctly. Also, his mom is from Hawaii and imbued in him the Hawaiian respect for nature and the power of the ocean. The definition of an accident is something that is not supposed to happen. Beldon's loss is not the result of some inappropriate risk. It is a very unfortunate combination of circumstances that shouldn't have happened, but did.
I am encouraged that so much effort was brought to bear trying to rescue him. Those people should be thanked and I feel bad that they will carry the burden of failure. I am sure that they did everything that they could.
And Lauren, this is an unfortunate byproduct of the internet age. Where something as personal as your fathers loss becomes public fodder for outsiders opinions. Remember that those who knew him, know better.
Madeline

Santa Rosa, CA

#17 Oct 17, 2010
I am both a student of broadcasting and a close friend of the deceased man's family. In the photographer's, he did send the pictures (as requested) to the victim's daughter, along with a very kind note. There were also several photos that were not especially graphic. A photo of the rescue helicopter, or the jet-ski rescue team that did not include the man's body, would have been perfectly appropriate for a news paper to print. I don't know which photos the photographer was attempting to sell to the news papers, but I'd like to give him the benefit of the doubt after reading his kind letter.
wangxing wrote:
As a journalist the photos should be given to the family as a professional courtesy. The rule is simple. You never ever put on the air or broadcast through written or aired media scenes that are emotionally explosive unless there is a good reason they are to be published. And even before they're put on the air, notification to the public that these are emotionally explicit photographs. That's why there are gatekeepers for the newspapers and television stations. And especially in a case like this where the family is grieving, the last thing they want is to have their dear one's body, face, persona splashed over all the local newspapers and in the press. That's why the newspapers wouldn't buy your photographs. Your lust for greed exceeded your respect for the family and the victim and went beyond the bounds of professional ethics.
Madeline

Santa Rosa, CA

#18 Oct 17, 2010
Ken,
Thank you for posting this. It needed to be said. You describe Beldon to a T.
Ken Quigley wrote:
I have known Beldon Yee for over 25 years, and have been abalone diving with him on occasion. He was a very experienced and competent diver, who was careful and clear-headed. He was also a very nice person in every way, who will be missed by many, many people at work and in his personal life.
One should not assume that Beldon couldn't resist diving after a long drive, despite bad conditions. He was not the type to do that, and knew that there would always be another day. He had respect for the sea, and knew better than to take chances.
As noted, ab diving is a very dangerous sport. The best of divers can get into trouble through no fault of their own, and the ocean can be very unforgiving. Things happen fast, and a partner is very often unaware that you are in trouble until it is too late.
In this sad situation, perhaps the only positive thing to be said is that Beldon died doing something that he loved to do. That is a gift, although a small consolation to us who will miss him.
PFOBY

Sacramento, CA

#19 Mar 11, 2011
If anyone is considering his death suspicious, then
you should consider those people in his company at the
time of his death, as well as those who would benefit
from his death, and their possible motives.

If you are seriously considering this, then
you should also bring this matter to law enforcement
without delay.

One fact I know for sure is, that he was associated
with Seth D. Derish, aka Eddie Oshins. Seth Derish,
aka Eddie Oshins, is not deceased, but incarcerated
in California on murder charges.

These statements I am placing here should only be
considered possibilities, and NOT fact, until thoroughly
investigated.

PFOBY
Ken Quigley

San Francisco, CA

#20 Mar 12, 2011
I am not aware of any considering Beldon's death to be "suspicious." What is suspicious, and worse, is for someone (who will not even post their own name) to sling another person's name around and try to stir up trouble, make defamatory implications, and generally say nothing useful while dropping heavy hints that a specific person has done something awful. That is a lot of things, but disgusting, shameful, low and sleazy spring to mind quite readily.

Who are you, and have you taken your medications or seen your psychiatrist lately? Please keep your insane ravings to yourself, or at least leave them out of a thread devoted to the memory of a very nice person who had the misfortune to drown accidentally while abalone diving.

Have a nice day, and please call your doctor.
PFOBY wrote:
If anyone is considering his death suspicious, then
you should consider those people in his company at the
time of his death, as well as those who would benefit
from his death, and their possible motives.
If you are seriously considering this, then
you should also bring this matter to law enforcement
without delay.
One fact I know for sure is, that he was associated
with Seth D. Derish, aka Eddie Oshins. Seth Derish,
aka Eddie Oshins, is not deceased, but incarcerated
in California on murder charges.
These statements I am placing here should only be
considered possibilities, and NOT fact, until thoroughly
investigated.
PFOBY

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