Connecticut's religiously intolerant history, Pt 2: Anglican Infiltration

Nov 2, 2013 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: Examiner.com

A sign outside Christ Episcopal Church in Stratford touts the parish's distinction as the first permanent foothold for the Anglicans in Connecticut.

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“... truth will out.”

Since: May 08

Stratford, Connecticut.

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#1
Nov 3, 2013
 
from Examiner:

"... An Anglican missionary group called The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts was set up in 1701 to provide English colonists with greater access to Episcopalian churches and services."

There were Episcopal Churchs and services in the colonies prior to 1776?
The First General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America wasn't until 1785.

"By 1784, most states agreed on the need to (1) draft a binding constitution for the whole church; (2) revise the English Book of Common Prayer to make it appropriate for use in the American church; and (3) obtain consecration of bishops in Apostolic Succession to give the American Church proper episcopal oversight and ministry.

"However, church leaders were split on the position that organization of the American Church could proceed without bishops in Apostolic Succession.

"Charles Inglis of New York left for England to seek ordination and later returned as the first Bishop of Nova Scotia. Many New England Episcopalians agreed with Inglis' approach to the argument, but southerners balked.

"On March 25, 1783, ten Connecticut clergy elected Samuel Seabury as their bishop. Seabury traveled to England, but English canon law prevented the consecration of any clergyman who would not take the Oath of Allegiance to the English Crown. Seabury then sought consecration in the Scottish Episcopal Church, where he was ordained on Nov. 14, 1784 in Aberdeen. Thus, Seabury became the first bishop of the American Episcopal Church."

http://www.episcopalchurch.org/page/history-a...

Since: Aug 09

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#2
Nov 4, 2013
 
Joe DeCaro wrote:
from Examiner:
"... An Anglican missionary group called The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts was set up in 1701 to provide English colonists with greater access to Episcopalian churches and services."

There were Episcopal Churchs and services in the colonies prior to 1776?

The First General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America wasn't until 1785.

"By 1784, most states agreed on the need to (1) draft a binding constitution for the whole church; (2) revise the English Book of Common Prayer to make it appropriate for use in the American church; and (3) obtain consecration of bishops in Apostolic Succession to give the American Church proper episcopal oversight and ministry.
"However, church leaders were split on the position that organization of the American Church could proceed without bishops in Apostolic Succession.
"Charles Inglis of New York left for England to seek ordination and later returned as the first Bishop of Nova Scotia. Many New England Episcopalians agreed with Inglis' approach to the argument, but southerners balked.
"On March 25, 1783, ten Connecticut clergy elected Samuel Seabury as their bishop. Seabury traveled to England, but English canon law prevented the consecration of any clergyman who would not take the Oath of Allegiance to the English Crown. Seabury then sought consecration in the Scottish Episcopal Church, where he was ordained on Nov. 14, 1784 in Aberdeen. Thus, Seabury became the first bishop of the American Episcopal Church."
http://www.episcopalchurch.org/page/history-a...
Thank you, Joe, for the clarification. You quote an account of TEC history that is pretty much correct.

The Topix Thread Article above is incorrect on many points. However, it IS pretty much correct as to the pre-Revolution "Anglican" Church in Connecticut.

As a result of the American Revolution and the Declaration of Independence, all Anglican clergy were required to disavow their Sacred Orders which held a very specific Oath of Loyalty to the King. Either that or be declared in America to be traitors subject to being hung by the neck until dead, if they did not flee the country. Most fled back to England or crossed into Canada. A number fled into British Colonies offshore and in the Carribean.

The Protestant Episcopalians were serious, without exception (although, I am sure there were a few Anglican clergy that slipped through the cracks and stayed, simply by laying low and seeking local protection). But, following the Revolution, no Anglican priests or Deacons remaining within the American Colonies openly conducted services with an open loyalty to the Crown.

However, historians know that there were many Loyalists among the citizens of the Republic, even after the Revolution.

Though the Connecticut Church building is the same, and that is a good thing, the writer of the article doesn't relate that the occupants at one point made a very conscious decision to become something completely different. Seabury had no intention of accepting allegiance to the Crown. He then made it official through The Scottish Rite.

Many news articles, just as this one does, seek to portray Anglican Church roots as uninterrupted from the beginning of American history. They do this deliberately, trying to establish a perception of a line of unbroken historical legitimacy to the Anglican Church on American soil, from pre-Revolution days until today.

It just isn't so. However, the Anglican Church certainly does have a presence in North America today, including the USA, though not fully through The Episcopal Church. TEC maintains a "Communion" with other Anglicans worldwide, recognizing the central figure of the Anglican Archbishop of Canterbury in England. But, TEC does not accord him any overseeing authority and is not likely to do so anytime in the forseeable future.

Rev. Ken

Since: Aug 09

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#3
Nov 4, 2013
 
Joe DeCaro wrote:
from Examiner:
"... An Anglican missionary group called The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts was set up in 1701 to provide English colonists with greater access to Episcopalian churches and services."

There were Episcopal Churchs and services in the colonies prior to 1776?

The First General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America wasn't until 1785.

"By 1784, most states agreed on the need to (1) draft a binding constitution for the whole church; (2) revise the English Book of Common Prayer to make it appropriate for use in the American church; and (3) obtain consecration of bishops in Apostolic Succession to give the American Church proper episcopal oversight and ministry.
"However, church leaders were split on the position that organization of the American Church could proceed without bishops in Apostolic Succession.
"Charles Inglis of New York left for England to seek ordination and later returned as the first Bishop of Nova Scotia. Many New England Episcopalians agreed with Inglis' approach to the argument, but southerners balked.
"On March 25, 1783, ten Connecticut clergy elected Samuel Seabury as their bishop. Seabury traveled to England, but English canon law prevented the consecration of any clergyman who would not take the Oath of Allegiance to the English Crown. Seabury then sought consecration in the Scottish Episcopal Church, where he was ordained on Nov. 14, 1784 in Aberdeen. Thus, Seabury became the first bishop of the American Episcopal Church."
http://www.episcopalchurch.org/page/history-a...
Thank you, Joe, for the clarification. You quote an account of TEC history that is pretty much correct.

The Topix Thread Article above is incorrect on many points. However, it IS pretty much correct as to the pre-Revolution "Anglican" Church in Connecticut.

As a result of the American Revolution and the Declaration of Independence, all Anglican clergy were required to disavow their Sacred Orders which held a very specific Oath of Loyalty to the King. Either that or be declared in America to be traitors subject to being hung by the neck until dead, if they did not flee the country. Most fled back to England or crossed into Canada. A number fled into British Colonies offshore and in the Caribbean.

The Protestant Episcopalians were serious, without exception (although, I am sure there were a few Anglican clergy that slipped through the cracks and stayed, simply by laying low and seeking local protection). But, following the Revolution, no Anglican priests or Deacons remaining within the American Colonies openly conducted services with an open loyalty to the Crown.

However, historians know that there were many Loyalists among the citizens of the Republic, even after the Revolution.

Though the Connecticut Church building is the same, and that is a good thing, the writer of the article doesn't relate that the occupants at one point made a very conscious decision to become something completely different. Seabury had no intention of accepting allegiance to the Crown. He then made it official through The Scottish Rite.

Many news articles, just as this one does, seek to portray Anglican Church roots as uninterrupted from the beginning of American history. They do this deliberately, trying to establish a perception of a line of unbroken historical legitimacy to the Anglican Church on American soil, from pre-Revolution days until today.

It just isn't so. However, the Anglican Church certainly does have a presence in North America today, including the USA, though not fully through The Episcopal Church. TEC maintains a "Communion" with other Anglicans worldwide, recognizing the central figure of the Anglican Archbishop of Canterbury in England. But, TEC does not accord him any overseeing authority and is not likely to do so anytime in the foreseeable future.

Rev. Ken

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