Barack Obama, our next President

Barack Obama, our next President

There are 1405476 comments on the Hampton Roads Daily Press story from Nov 5, 2008, titled Barack Obama, our next President. In it, Hampton Roads Daily Press reports that:

"The road ahead will be long. Our climb will be steep," Obama cautioned. Young and charismatic but with little experience on the national level, Obama smashed through racial barriers and easily defeated ...

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Hampton Roads Daily Press.

FOX Jewish media n ROMNEY

Chicago, IL

#640370 May 12, 2012
Norton wrote:
<quoted text>
"Bitch-slapped evil Allah out of Iraq"? What's that supposed to mean?
Here's a clue. You don't lie the American people into an unnecessary war, which is what Bush and Cheney did.
That conflict did not serve our national interests and it was ruinously expensive.
wrong ! iraq is paying for herself already . We own iraqi oil fields and as long as muslims r killing each other life's great
Norton

Tampa, FL

#640371 May 12, 2012
shinningelectr0n wrote:
<quoted text>
Oh. I see. So Congress didn't have a clue, eh?
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA
If somebody let you, you'd be great at rewriting history, dood!
OK OK, I am just a stupid kid, but this is so much fun.
I hope daddy does not get mad, but he is a devout Leninist
so he will be proud :P
nancy

West Palm Beach, FL

#640372 May 12, 2012
Elected the first black president of the Harvard Law Review, Obama was offered a book contract, but the intellectual journey he planned to recount became instead this poignant, probing memoir of an unusual life. Born in 1961 to a white American woman and a black Kenyan student, Obama was reared in Hawaii by his mother and her parents, his father having left for further study and a return home to Africa. So Obama's not-unhappy youth is nevertheless a lonely voyage to racial identity, tensions in school, struggling with black literature?with one month-long visit when he was 10 from his commanding father. After college, Obama became a community organizer in Chicago. He slowly found place and purpose among folks of similar hue but different memory, winning enough small victories to commit himself to the work?he's now a civil rights lawyer there. Before going to law school, he finally visited Kenya; with his father dead, he still confronted obligation and loss, and found wellsprings of love and attachment. Obama leaves some lingering questions?his mother is virtually absent?but still has written a resonant book. Photos not seen by PW. Author tour.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.
From Booklist
Obama argues with himself on almost every page of this lively autobiographical conversation. He gets you to agree with him, and then he brings in a counternarrative that seems just as convincing. Son of a white American mother and of a black Kenyan father whom he never knew, Obama grew up mainly in Hawaii. After college, he worked for three years as a community organizer on Chicago's South Side. Then, finally, he went to Kenya, to find the world of his dead father, his "authentic" self. Will the truth set you free, Obama asks? Or will it disappoint? Both, it seems. His search for himself as a black American is rooted in the particulars of his daily life; it also reads like a wry commentary about all of us. He dismisses stereotypes of the "tragic mulatto" and then shows how much we are all caug

ht between messy contradictions and disparate communities. He discovers that Kenya has 400 different tribes, each of them with stereotypes of the others. Obama is candid about racism and poverty and corruption, in Chicago and in Kenya. Yet he does find community and authenticity, not in any romantic cliche{‚}, but with "honest, decent men and women who have attainable ambitions and the determination to see them through." Hazel Rochman --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
See all Editorial Reviews U.S. Senate hopeful Barack Obama has an inspiring story to share, and yet he doesn't simply rest on his laurels in this critical evaluation of his life and in his continuing search for himself as a black American. He wrote "Dreams From My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance" almost ten years ago, but his stock has obviously surged since his star-making speech at the Democratic National Convention last month, perhaps to the chagrin of Hillary Clinton...unless she is dreaming of a Clinton-Obama ticket in 2008! Growing up mulatto in Hawaii and Indonesia, Obama discusses trying to come to grips with his racial identity through a period of rebellion that included drug use, becoming a community activist in Chicago and traveling to Kenya to understand his father's past. It is in Kenya where he discovers a nation with forty different tribes, each of them saddled with stereotypes of the others. It is also in Kenya where he recognizes the dichotomy that has been his lifelong existence between the graves of his father and his grandfather. His description of this defining moment is worthy of a passage in Alex Haley's "Roots".

Obama is also candid about racism, poverty and corruption in Chicago, and he pulls no punches in his account of this period. Because the book stops in 1995, it does not get into muc
Dentin

West Palm Beach, FL

#640373 May 12, 2012
nancy wrote:
Elected the first black president of the Harvard Law Review, Obama was offered a book contract, but the intellectual journey he planned to recount became instead this poignant, probing memoir of an unusual life. Born in 1961 to a white American woman and a black Kenyan student, Obama was reared in Hawaii by his mother and her parents, his father having left for further study and a return home to Africa. So Obama's not-unhappy youth is nevertheless a lonely voyage to racial identity, tensions in school, struggling with black literature?with one month-long visit when he was 10 from his commanding father. After college, Obama became a community organizer in Chicago. He slowly found place and purpose among folks of similar hue but different memory, winning enough small victories to commit himself to the work?he's now a civil rights lawyer there. Before going to law school, he finally visited Kenya; with his father dead, he still confronted obligation and loss, and found wellsprings of love and attachment. Obama leaves some lingering questions?his mother is virtually absent?but still has written a resonant book. Photos not seen by PW. Author tour.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.
From Booklist
Obama argues with himself on almost every page of this lively autobiographical conversation. He gets you to agree with him, and then he brings in a counternarrative that seems just as convincing. Son of a white American mother and of a black Kenyan father whom he never knew, Obama grew up mainly in Hawaii. After college, he worked for three years as a community organizer on Chicago's South Side. Then, finally, he went to Kenya, to find the world of his dead father, his "authentic" self. Will the truth set you free, Obama asks? Or will it disappoint? Both, it seems. His search for himself as a black American is rooted in the particulars of his daily life; it also reads like a wry commentary about all of us. He dismisses stereotypes of the "tragic mulatto" and then shows how much we are all caug
ht between messy contradictions and disparate communities. He discovers that Kenya has 400 different tribes, each of them with stereotypes of the others. Obama is candid about racism and poverty and corruption, in Chicago and in Kenya. Yet he does find community and authenticity, not in any romantic cliche{‚}, but with "honest, decent men and women who have attainable ambitions and the determination to see them through." Hazel Rochman --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
See all Editorial Reviews U.S. Senate hopeful Barack Obama has an inspiring story to share, and yet he doesn't simply rest on his laurels in this critical evaluation of his life and in his continuing search for himself as a black American. He wrote "Dreams From My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance" almost ten years ago, but his stock has obviously surged since his star-making speech at the Democratic National Convention last month, perhaps to the chagrin of Hillary Clinton...unless she is dreaming of a Clinton-Obama ticket in 2008! Growing up mulatto in Hawaii and Indonesia, Obama discusses trying to come to grips with his racial identity through a period of rebellion that included drug use, becoming a community activist in Chicago and traveling to Kenya to understand his father's past. It is in Kenya where he discovers a nation with forty different tribes, each of them saddled with stereotypes of the others. It is also in Kenya where he recognizes the dichotomy that has been his lifelong existence between the graves of his father and his grandfather. His description of this defining moment is worthy of a passage in Alex Haley's "Roots".
Obama is also candid about racism, poverty and corruption in Chicago, and he pulls no punches in his account of this period. Because the book stops in 1995, it does not get
its about time the truth is out
nancy

West Palm Beach, FL

#640374 May 12, 2012
nancy wrote:
Elected the first black president of the Harvard Law Review, Obama was

offered a book contract, but the intellectual journey he planned to recount became instead this poignant, probing memoir of an unusual life. Born in 1961 to a white American woman and a black Kenyan student, Obama was reared in Hawaii by his mother and her parents, his father having left for further study and a return home to Africa. So Obama's not-unhappy youth is nevertheless a lonely voyage to racial identity, tensions in school, struggling with black literature?with one month-long visit when he was 10 from his commanding father. After college, Obama became a community organizer in Chicago. He slowly found place and purpose among folks of similar hue but diffe

rent memory, winning enough small victories to commit himself to the work?he's now a civil rights lawyer there. Before going to law

...
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. school, he finally visited Kenya; with his father dead, he still confronted obligation and loss, and found wellsprings of love and attachment. Obama leaves some lingering questions?his mother is virtually absent?but still has written a resonant book. Photos not seen by PW. Author tour.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.
From Booklist
Obama argues with himself on almost every page of this lively autobiographical conversation. He gets you to agree with him, and then he brings in a counternarrative that seems just as convincing. Son of a white American mother and of a black Kenyan father whom he never knew, Obama grew up mainly in Hawaii. After college, he worked for three years as a community organizer on Chicago's South Side. Then, finally, he went to Kenya, to find the world of his dead father, his "authentic" self. Will the truth set you free, Obama asks? Or will it disappoint? Both, it seems. His search for himself as a black American is rooted in the particulars of his daily life; it also reads like a wry commentary about all of us. He dismisses stereotypes of the "tragic mulatto" and then shows how much we are all caug
ht between messy contradictions and disparate communities. He discovers that Kenya has 400 different tribes, each of them with stereotypes of the others. Obama is candid about racism and poverty and corruption, in Chicago and in Kenya. Yet he does find community and authenticity, not in any romantic cliche{‚}, but with "honest, decent men and women who have attainable ambitions and the determination to see them through." Hazel Rochman --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
See all Editorial Reviews U.S. Senate hopeful Barack Obama has an inspiring story to share, and yet he doesn't simply rest on his laurels in this critical evaluation of his life and in his continuing search for himself as a black American. He wrote "Dreams From My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance" almost ten years ago, but his stock has obviously surged since his star-making speech at the Democratic National Convention last month, perhaps to the chagrin of Hillary Clinton...unless she is dreaming of a Clinton-Obama ticket in 2008! Growing up mulatto in Hawaii and Indonesia, Obama discusses trying to come to grips with his racial identity through a period of rebellion that included drug use, becoming a community activist in Chicago and traveling to Kenya to understand his father's past. It is in Kenya where he discovers a nation with forty different tribes, each of them saddled with stereotypes of the othert is also in Kenya where he recognizes the dichotomy that has been his lifelong existence between the graves of his father and his grandfather. His description of this defining moment is worthy of a passage in Alex Haley's "Roots".
Obama is also candid about racism, poverty and corruption in Chicago, and he pulls no punches in his account of this period. Because the book stops in 1995, it does not get into muc
you agree

Since: Oct 11

Location hidden

#640375 May 12, 2012
Norton wrote:
<quoted text>
I could keep repeating the same facts, that Bush was in office when the financial markets were crashing and 500,000 jobs were being lost each month.
But what's the point? I'm dealing with a GOP cretin who when faced with the facts resorts to sarcasm and denials.
In other words, a mentality divorced from the real world.
Well I guess your messiah must have fixed everything then, seeing he's hitting the campaign trail so hard instead of fixing the country.

Just keep following the rest of the sheep
Dentin

West Palm Beach, FL

#640376 May 12, 2012
nancy wrote:
Elected the first black president of the Harvard Law Review, Obama was offered a book contract, but the intellectual journey he planned to recount became instead this poignant, probing memoir of an unusual life. Born in 1961 to a white American woman and a black Kenyan student, Obama was reared in Hawaii by his mother and her parents, his father having left for further study and a return home to Africa. So Obama's not-unhappy youth is nevertheless a lonely voyage to racial identity, tensions in school, struggling with black literature?with one month-long visit when he was 10 from his commanding father. After college, Obama became a community organizer in Chicago. He slowly found place and purpose among folks of similar hue but different memory, winning enough small victories to commit himself to the work?he's now a civil rights lawyer there. Before going to law school, he finally visited Kenya; with his father dead, he still confronted obligation and loss, and found wellsprings of love and attachment. Obama leaves some lingering questions?his mother is virtually absent?but still has written a resonant book. Photos not seen by PW. Author tour.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.
From Booklist
Obama argues with himself on almost every page of this lively autobiographical conversation. He gets you to agree with him, and then he brings in a counternarrative that seems just as convincing. Son of a white American mother and of a black Kenyan father whom he never knew, Obama grew up mainly in Hawaii. After college, he worked for three years as a community organizer on Chicago's South Side. Then, finally, he went to Kenya, to find the world of his dead father, his "authentic" self. Will the truth set you free, Obama asks? Or will it disappoint? Both, it seems. His search for himself as a black American is rooted in the particulars of his daily life; it also reads like a wry commentary about all of us. He dismisses stereotypes of the "tragic mulatto" and then shows how much we are all caug
ht between messy contradictions and disparate communities. He discovers that Kenya has 400 different tribes, each of them with stereotypes of the others. Obama is candid about racism and poverty and corruption, in Chicago and in Kenya. Yet he does find community and authenticity, not in any romantic cliche{‚}, but with "honest, decent men and women who have attainable ambitions and the determination to see them through." Hazel Rochman --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
See all Editorial Reviews U.S. Senate hopeful Barack Obama has an inspiring story to share, and yet he doesn't simply rest on his laurels in this critical evaluation of his life and in his continuing search for himself as a black American. He wrote "Dreams From My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance" almost ten years ago, but his stock has obviously surged since his star-making speech at the Democratic National Convention last month, perhaps to the chagrin of Hillary Clinton...unless she is dreaming of a Clinton-Obama ticket in 2008! Growing up mulatto in Hawaii and Indonesia, Obama discusses trying to come to grips with his racial identity through a period of rebellion that included drug use, becoming a community activist in Chicago and traveling to Kenya to understand his father's past. It is in Kenya where he discovers a nation with forty different tribes, each of them saddled with stereotypes of the others. It is also in Kenya where he recognizes the dichotomy that has been his lifelong existence between the graves of his father and his grandfather. His description of this defining moment is worthy of a passage in Alex Haley's "Roots".
Obama is also candid about racism, poverty and corruption in Chicago, and he pulls no punches in his account of this period. Because the book stops in 1995, it does not get into muc
Who are you?
Norton

United States

#640377 May 12, 2012
shinningelectr0n wrote:
<quoted text>
If you work in Hollywood/Music/Media and are not a pro-gay, Socialist, Marxist and a condescending SOB Liberal loudmouth, you won't have a job longer than your first paycheck.
There are a lot of silent conservatives in those industries. They have mouths to feed.
Hollywood had many producers, directors and actors who leaned left politically during its golden years in the late 50s and 60s.

So your rant stands refuted on that point alone.

The chief problem with films today is no imagination whatsoever and second-rate directors whose emphasis is on special effects and shock value, not good story-telling.

The trend in movies has been more and more based on a business model.

Hence, lots of promotionals, right down to the plastic cup of coca cola you get with your Burger King order.

Young, inexperienced actors willing to work cheap is increasingly the rule.

It's all based on cost-cutting and advertising to get the most out of the bottom line.

Seems like the conservative profit model in action, to put it mildly.

“Is that all you've got?”

Since: Jun 10

Location hidden

#640378 May 13, 2012
Norton wrote:
<quoted text>
Try, try, try to remember what idiot was in office when the financial markets crashed in late 2008 and we were losing 500,000 jobs per month.
Want a hint, cretin? GW Bush.
Now sit in your loon chair and try to figure it all out.
The huge loss in jobs for Americans began with the implementation of NAFTA under Bill Clinton's Democratic regime.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_F...

Bill and Hillary both made money off his signing it into effect. How convenient for them. The government set up workshops showing business owners how much they could improve their profits if they closed shop in America and moved south of the border, hiring cheap local labor. Bill was famous for "outsourcing" (as he was so fond of calling it) work to foreign countries rather than hiring Americans to do local work.
Norton

United States

#640380 May 13, 2012
FOX Jewish media n ROMNEY wrote:
<quoted text>wrong ! iraq is paying for herself already . We own iraqi oil fields and as long as muslims r killing each other life's great
Irrelevant. There was no moral justification for going in, and that's the main point.

That U.S. companies are exploiting the oil as you claim only confirms what we Democrats suspected all along.
Dentin

West Palm Beach, FL

#640381 May 13, 2012
Norton wrote:
<quoted text>
Hollywood had many producers, directors and actors who leaned left politically during its golden years in the late 50s and 60s.
So your rant stands refuted on that point alone.
The chief problem with films today is no imagination whatsoever and second-rate directors whose emphasis is on special effects and shock value, not good story-telling.
The trend in movies has been more and more based on a business model.
Hence, lots of promotionals, right down to the plastic cup of coca cola you get with your Burger King order.
Young, inexperienced actors willing to work cheap is increasingly the rule.
It's all based on cost-cutting and advertising to get the most out of the bottom line.
Seems like the conservative profit model in action, to put it mildly.
i see your a troll
Norton

United States

#640382 May 13, 2012
whooyaa wrote:
<quoted text>
Well I guess your messiah must have fixed everything then, seeing he's hitting the campaign trail so hard instead of fixing the country.
Just keep following the rest of the sheep
Maybe he didn't fix it.

But your side made the mess. And it was a big one.
Norton

United States

#640384 May 13, 2012
nanoanomaly wrote:
<quoted text>The huge loss in jobs for Americans began with the implementation of NAFTA under Bill Clinton's Democratic regime.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_F...
Bill and Hillary both made money off his signing it into effect. How convenient for them. The government set up workshops showing business owners how much they could improve their profits if they closed shop in America and moved south of the border, hiring cheap local labor. Bill was famous for "outsourcing" (as he was so fond of calling it) work to foreign countries rather than hiring Americans to do local work.
NAFTA began with GHW Bush. Not to mention conferring "most favored nation" status on China which paved the way for its economic onslaught on U.S. domestic markets.
Dentin

West Palm Beach, FL

#640386 May 13, 2012
nancy wrote:
<quoted text> you agree
by
Norton

United States

#640388 May 13, 2012
nanoanomaly wrote:
<quoted text>The huge loss in jobs for Americans began with the implementation of NAFTA under Bill Clinton's Democratic regime.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_F...
Bill and Hillary both made money off his signing it into effect. How convenient for them. The government set up workshops showing business owners how much they could improve their profits if they closed shop in America and moved south of the border, hiring cheap local labor. Bill was famous for "outsourcing" (as he was so fond of calling it) work to foreign countries rather than hiring Americans to do local work.
I have to express some contempt here.

First, you jump into a fight between me and Shiny Electron. Is that an admission that Shiny needs your help? Can't stand on his own two feet?

Continuing. You don't even read what you post, you idiot.

Here, from your own link:

"Following diplomatic negotiations dating back to 1986 among the three nations, the leaders met in San Antonio, Texas, on December 17, 1992, to sign NAFTA. U.S. President George H. W. Bush, Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and Mexican President Carlos Salinas, each responsible for spearheading and promoting the agreement, ceremonially signed it. The agreement then needed to be ratified by each nation's legislative or parliamentary branch."

So it was a done deal under Bush I.

But to further drive into your thick skull what a cretin you are, the financial crisis of 2008 was ignited by the collapsing housing market.

Go back to your sand box, little girl. You're not ready to mix it up with the big boys yet.
nancy

West Palm Beach, FL

#640389 May 13, 2012
Elected the first black president of the Harvard Law Review, Obama was offered a book contract, but the intellectual journey he planned to recount became instead this poignant, probing memoir of an unusual life. Born in 1961 to a white American woman and a black Kenyan student, Obama was reared in Hawaii by his mother and her parents, his father having left for further study and a return home to Africa. So Obama's not-unhappy youth is nevertheless a lonely voyage to racial identity, tensions in school, struggling with black literature?with one month-long visit when he was 10 from his commanding father. After college, Obama became a community organizer in Chicago. He slowly found place and purpose among folks of similar hue but different memory, winning enough small victories to commit himself to the work?he's now a civil rights lawyer there. Before going to law school, he finally visited Kenya; with his father dead, he still confronted obligation and loss, and found wellsprings of love and attachment. Obama leaves some lingering questions?his mother is virtually absent?but still has written a resonant book. Photos not seen by PW. Author tour.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.
From Booklist
Obama argues with himself on almost every page of this lively autobiographical conversation. He gets you to agree with him, and then he brings in a counternarrative that seems just as convincing. Son of a white American mother and of a black Kenyan father whom he never knew, Obama grew up mainly in Hawaii. After college, he worked for three years as a community organizer on Chicago's South Side. Then, finally, he went to Kenya, to find the world of his dead father, his "authentic" self. Will the truth set you free, Obama asks? Or will it disappoint? Both, it seems. His search for himself as a black American is rooted in the particulars of his daily life; it also reads like a wry commentary about all of us. He dismisses stereotypes of the "tragic mulatto" and then shows how much we are all caug

ht between messy contradictions and disparate communities. He discovers that Kenya has 400 different tribes, each of them with stereotypes of the others. Obama is candid about racism and poverty and corruption, in Chicago and in Kenya. Yet he does find community and authenticity, not in any romantic cliche{‚}, but with "honest, decent men and women who have attainable ambitions and the determination to see them through." Hazel Rochman --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
See all Editorial Reviews U.S. Senate hopeful Barack Obama has an inspiring story to share, and yet he doesn't simply rest on his laurels in this critical evaluation of his life and in his continuing search for himself as a black American. He wrote "Dreams From My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance" almost ten years ago, but his stock has obviously surged since his star-making speech at the Democratic National Convention last month, perhaps to the chagrin of Hillary Clinton...unless she is dreaming of a Clinton-Obama ticket in 2008! Growing up mulatto in Hawaii and Indonesia, Obama discusses trying to come to grips with his racial identity through a period of rebellion that included drug use, becoming a community activist in Chicago and traveling to Kenya to understand his father's past. It is in Kenya where he discovers a nation with forty different tribes, each of them saddled with stereotypes of the others. It is also in Kenya where he recognizes the dichotomy that has been his lifelong existence between the graves of his father and his grandfather. His description of this defining moment is worthy of a passage in Alex Haley's "Roots".

Obama is also candid about racism, poverty and corruption in Chicago, and he pulls no punches in his account of this period. Because the book stops in 1995, it does not get into muc
Dentin

Hollywood, FL

Reply »
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Judge it!
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#640373
10 min ago
ggb
Norton

United States

#640391 May 13, 2012
shinningelectr0n wrote:
<quoted text>
Avoiding any discussion about the mess the Kenyan Snake has made will not work, little person.
What mess did Obama create?

The one you conjured up out of your vivid imagination?

There's only been one mess.

The one your chimp left behind.

Live with it.
Grady

West Palm Beach, FL

#640394 May 13, 2012
Elected the first black president of the Harvard Law Review, Obama was offered a book contract, but the intellectual journey he planned to recount became instead this poignant, probing memoir of an unusual life. Born in 1961 to a white American woman and a black Kenyan student, Obama was reared in Hawaii by his mother and her parents, his father having left for further study and a return home to Africa. So Obama's not-unhappy youth is nevertheless a lonely voyage to racial identity, tensions in school, struggling with black literature?with one month-long visit when he was 10 from his commanding father. After college, Obama became a community organizer in Chicago. He slowly found place and purpose among folks of similar hue but different memory, winning enough small victories to commit himself to the work?he's now a civil rights lawyer there. Before going to law school, he finally visited Kenya; with his father dead, he still confronted obligation and loss, and found wellsprings of love and attachment. Obama leaves some lingering questions?his mother is virtually absent?but still has written a resonant book. Photos not seen by PW. Author tour.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.
From Booklist
Obama argues with himself on almost every page of this lively autobiographical conversation. He gets you to agree with him, and then he brings in a counternarrative that seems just as convincing. Son of a white American mother and of a black Kenyan father whom he never knew, Obama grew up mainly in Hawaii. After college, he worked for three years as a community organizer on Chicago's South Side. Then, finally, he went to Kenya, to find the world of his dead father, his "authentic" self. Will the truth set you free, Obama asks? Or will it disappoint? Both, it seems. His search for himself as a black American is rooted in the particulars of his daily life; it also reads like a wry commentary about all of us. He dismisses stereotypes of the "tragic mulatto" and then shows how much we are all caug

ht between messy contradictions and disparate communities. He discovers that Kenya has 400 different tribes, each of them with stereotypes of the others. Obama is candid about racism and poverty and corruption, in Chicago and in Kenya. Yet he does find community and authenticity, not in any romantic cliche{‚}, but with "honest, decent men and women who have attainable ambitions and the determination to see them through." Hazel Rochman --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
See all Editorial Reviews U.S. Senate hopeful Barack Obama has an inspiring story to share, and yet he doesn't simply rest on his laurels in this critical evaluation of his life and in his continuing search for himself as a black American. He wrote "Dreams From My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance" almost ten years ago, but his stock has obviously surged since his star-making speech at the Democratic National Convention last month, perhaps to the chagrin of Hillary Clinton...unless she is dreaming of a Clinton-Obama ticket in 2008! Growing up mulatto in Hawaii and Indonesia, Obama discusses trying to come to grips with his racial identity through a period of rebellion that included drug use, becoming a community activist in Chicago and traveling to Kenya to understand his father's past. It is in Kenya where he discovers a nation with forty different tribes, each of them saddled with stereotypes of the others. It is also in Kenya where he recognizes the dichotomy that has been his lifelong existence between the graves of his father and his grandfather. His description of this defining moment is worthy of a passage in Alex Haley's "Roots".

Obama is also candid about racism, poverty and corruption in Chicago, and he pulls no punches in his account of this period. Because the book stops in 1995, it does not get into muc
Dentin

Hollywood, FL

Reply »
|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#640373
10 mi
Norton

United States

#640396 May 13, 2012
FOX Jewish media n ROMNEY wrote:
<quoted text>muslims deserved what they got . They are nothing more but animals .
Go join the Adolf Hitler fan club. It's perfect for you.
Norton

United States

#640398 May 13, 2012
Dentin wrote:
<quoted text>i see your a troll
Wow, that was deep, Junior. And it took you what? Only three hours to compose?

Keep 'em coming, halfwit.

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