Stretching the Spine to Ease Pain

A local chiropractor is literally pulling his patients apart. The new technique stretches his patients' spines and ends decades of pain. Full Story
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Pam

Winnipeg, Canada

#22 Jun 20, 2007
visionary:

I would also like to add that I also experienced terrible mid-back pain. Still have some pain, actually.
I've found that when my neck is in alignment (and when my hamstring muscles are stretched out and loose), my mid-back pain is easier to control. Honestly, I have NUCCA to thank for that (as well as my cardio, weight-lifting, and stretching program).
Sorry, I sound like an infomercial! I just love NUCCA so much! It's made the quality of my life so much better. I couldn't work when I had the car accidents, and I even had to drop out of grad school because it was too painful to study for any sustained period of time. Now, I'm back at work and I'll return to graduate studies in the fall.
jim

AOL

#23 Jun 20, 2007
I am not surprised that chiropractic " ding bats" feel they are starting to sound like "infomercials". The rest I find hard to understand. Must have something to do with cults.I hope you get better soon. Both mentally and pysically.
Andrew

Brisbane, Australia

#24 Jun 20, 2007
its ok pam, not everyone is disappointed that you are starting to feel better, good for you.
Just remember some people in here can't get over the fact that some things work for some people, while others don't. They get frustrated that the things they rally against for whatever reason might be beneficial for some. Its sad i know, but just look over them, they are insignificant people, otherwise they would take propper action rather than express these old time lame views on forums
jim

AOL

#25 Jun 20, 2007
Hey hotshot, just try and make money with this bullcrap someday. HAHAHA
Andrew

Brisbane, Australia

#26 Jun 20, 2007
again, who says im going to go down that path....just another incorrect assumption you have made about something you know nothing about
jim

AOL

#27 Jun 20, 2007
OK, maybe I was wrong about you being a hot shot.
Boobah

Salt Lake City, UT

#28 Jun 26, 2007
Visionary, you might like to try Pilates, too, which is a form of exercise that involves the muscles of you back and abdomen and strengthens what they call your "core" muscles. It feels great and is as gentle or strenuous an exercise program as you want to make it. If cost is an issue, you can check out Pilates videos from the library for free. Just an idea...
Helpful advice

Shelbyville, MI

#29 Jun 26, 2007
jim wrote:
Chiropractors have NO formal training in soft tissue rehab. They treat imaginary subluxations. If you go to a chiropractor he will want you to continue for the rest of your life. You will need to sigh up all your famaily and friends to get your discount.
It's so sad you feel that way. Have you personally, or anyone you know went to an actualy GOOD chiropractor? Yes, there area some questionable ones out there, but I have seen what chiropractic can do personally, and although I don't go around touting it to everyone I would never put down something I didn't know about. Yes, one bad apple can spoil the bunch. As far as the discount goes... does your daycare give you a discount for multiple children? does your insurance give you a discount for multiple autos? get my point... it's a courtesy not a hook. Grow up and give some good advicE!
tom

United States

#30 Jun 27, 2007
Jim posts:
>>"Chiropractors have NO formal training in soft tissue rehab....."<<

A totally bogus declaration.
But then this( as are all of his volumes of posts here), contain NO links, references, or data to support his outrageous claims. I guess he thinks that just because he posts fictious claims, adinfinitum, we are supposed to believe that it is true! HAHAHA! What a chucklehead!

Actually DCs have substantial "formal training in soft tissue rehab". Unlike jim, I can support my claim.
----------

A sample DC curriculum:

http://www.nwhealth.edu/edprogr/chiro/cudescr...

PHYSIOLOGICAL THERAPEUTICS 1: Modality Applications - 35151

Description
Credits: 2.25
Clock Hours: 52.5
Lecture Hours: 15
Lab Hours: 37.5
Theories and application of heat, cold, traction, and electrical modalities as adjuncts to patient management. Discussion of indications, contraindications, and modifications of physiological therapeutics based on various conditions and situations.


----------

PHYSIOLOGICAL THERAPEUTICS 2: Soft Tissue Techniques - 33561

Description
Credits: 1.5
Clock Hours: 45
Lab Hours: 45
The primary focus of this course is the rehabilitation of damaged soft tissue that occurs with injuries frequently encountered by chiropractic clinicians. Methods to decrease pain, increase range of motion, increase muscle strength and endurance, as well as increasing aerobic health, are discussed.

----------

PHYSIOLOGICAL THERAPEUTICS 3:Exercise & Rehabilitation - 35170

Description
Credits: 1.5
Clock Hours: 30
Lecture Hours: 15
Lab Hours: 15
Discussion of the role of exercise in the comprehensive conservative management of commonly encountered conditions. Principles of exercise therapy and exercise psychology. Concepts and skills relative to exercise techniques, and emphasis on spinal stabilization. Specific protocols regarding the prescription of exercise.

----------

METHODS 7: Selectives course number varies by offering

Description
Credits:.75
Clock Hours: 22.5
Lab Hours: 45
Prerequisite: Completion of Methods 1 through 6

The capstone of the Methods sequence is a selection of mini-courses in various techniques. Students are required to complete two such mini-courses to satisfy their Methods 7 requirement.......... advanced soft-tissue techniques,.........

---------

The above are just the courses solely devoted to soft tissue. Soft tissue rehab is also incorporated into the case studies classes, clinical internship treatment plans, and other classes that deal with specific patient populations- eg. geriatrics, athletes, etc.
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One of the most authoritive books on Rehab is written by a DC:

Rehabilitation of the Spine: A Practitioner's Manual
by Craig Liebenson

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/078172...

Other DCs have also authored texts on management of soft tissue condition/injuries, however, the above example is adequate for the purpose of this discussion.

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Additionally, there is a formal 3 year post-grad program entirely devoted to soft tissue rehab:

American Chiropractic Rehabilitation Board

http://www.acrb.org/for-doctors/standards-pro...
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Sample First year rehab syllabus:

http://www.nwhealth.edu/conted/seminars/Rehab...
jim

AOL

#31 Jun 27, 2007
They have added all this since I was in school. When I went there was none of this. I wonder if all schools are doing this. I would say that if you go to the average chiropractor today he would not have had any of this in school. This is one huge move in the right direction I have to admit. Now if you just could admit there is no such thing as a subluxation the way it has always been taught.
jim

AOL

#32 Jun 27, 2007
I find it intresting that such a large portion of the soft tissue stuff is taught after graduation. Can you explain this?
tom

United States

#33 Jun 28, 2007
Jim posts:
>>"Chiropractors have NO formal training in soft tissue rehab....."<<

Well, perhaps Jim- my post, outlining and documenting the fact that DCs, DO in fact, have "formal training in soft tissue rehab" was a bit too complex for you.

The first half--- documents the "formal training in soft tissue rehab" DCs get as part of the core DC curriculum: 150+ hours of classes and labs(plus special populations classes mentioned above), plus the 300+ hours of incorporation of that knowledge into the clinical/internship protocol.

YES- that is verifiable documentation of the "FORMAL TRAINING" you tried to mislead readers to believe DCs do not receive.


If you feel the need to dispute that, please provide the same quality of verifiable documentation..... not anecdotes,or any other variety of misleading heresay.

Perhaps, you got confused when, I additionally, provided rehab texts written by DCs, and DC post-grad "formal training", for those DCs that want to focus and expand on that area of their practices.

I am sorry my post was confusing for you. I will make every attempt, in the future, to make my documentations clearer.
jim

AOL

#34 Jun 28, 2007
I find it intresting that such a large portion of the soft tissue stuff is taught after graduation. Can you explain this? Why do dc's find it neccessary to pay more money for special instruction in soft tissue instruction after they have already paids tens of thousands. The answer is because they were taught very little to nothing in chiro school about it. When they get out of school they learn the subluxation is bunk and people won't pay for it. They race to become second rate PT's.
jim

AOL

#35 Jun 28, 2007
And then no matter how many thousands more they pay to learn about soft tissue, at the end of the day all they can do is apply ice or heat and give the patients some exercises to do. This may work as long as insurance pays for it. But you are talking about some poor doctors getting poorer all the time. Insurance is not going to pay for this like it is brain surgery. People may pay somethig to get their ankle taped but not enough to pay back 100,000 dollars. Plus your living expenses. If you are like most chiropractors you will go broke and get out of the business. Many will become lying crooks before they finally give up. Many students believe they won't be a part of the 50 percent who don't make it. They never think about the misery index for those who stay. None of this matters to the schools. They will already have your money.You will see their true colors but it will be to late.

Since: Mar 07

Prairie Village, KS

#36 Jun 28, 2007
Your chiro should be careful what he touches if it is not the back or attached to the back. In NJ for example they are forbidden to adjust "limbs".
How can you do much soft tissue without moving legs and arms around?
And... what about the difference between mobilization and manipulation?
jim

AOL

#37 Jun 29, 2007
Mobilization has of course been shown to be more benifical than manipulation in most cases. Thats why PT's use it so much.

Since: Mar 07

Prairie Village, KS

#38 Jun 30, 2007
Mobilization : my point exactly, that and mobilization strictly speaking IS NOT chiropractic. It was borrowed from the PT's.

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