Worst Baby Names
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Ponderer

United States

#1 Mar 18, 2008
Someone just published a book on the worst baby names in history.

My entry is "Candy Korn." No joke. I figured her parents were sadists, if not serial killers. Wonder how Candy has fared.

Since: Oct 07

Ticonderoga, NY

#2 Mar 19, 2008
Sounds like a stripper....or porn star. LOL
Ponderer wrote:
Someone just published a book on the worst baby names in history.
My entry is "Candy Korn." No joke. I figured her parents were sadists, if not serial killers. Wonder how Candy has fared.
just a person

Latham, NY

#3 Mar 19, 2008
years ago one of my neighbors was a doctor in a large city hospital, she had a inter city girl that gave birth, when she seen the sign on the babies bed--FEMALE-- she stated that she loved this name and wanted to name her little girl that. True story
Red

Cohoes, NY

#4 Mar 19, 2008
August June May July October
Me in Ti

Cobleskill, NY

#5 Mar 19, 2008
MY NAME IS JUNE!!
Ponderer

United States

#6 Mar 19, 2008
Seen on a name tag in Target: "Hi, my name is Latrine."
Names

Humble, TX

#7 Mar 19, 2008
I had an Aunt May. She was in a wheelchair for 30 yrs. due to severe arthritis and I remember her hands being so soft.
Daughter lived near a family in the TX Panhandle who had a son named Yourmajesty. Yup -- you read that right.
Ponderer

United States

#8 Mar 19, 2008
I met a woman in Amsterdam whose name was "Femay." When I asked what it meant, she said, "female." Sounded good to me, but "Girly-Girl" just doesn't have that panache. But what about "Guy"?(Or is that just an English version of "Guy" (gee) as in "Maupassant"?)

I feel a limerick or two coming on: "There once was this guy from France, who said ..." OR "There once was a girl from A'dam, who seldom sought out a ..."
Ti Res

Cobleskill, NY

#9 Mar 19, 2008
Flo Rida.
Name

Schenectady, NY

#10 Mar 20, 2008
Flo Rida is a stage name not a birth name.
Ticonderogian

United States

#11 Mar 20, 2008
Shyanne...not sure if that is the correct spelling.
Sure-ok

AOL

#12 Mar 20, 2008
Tercell,cellica anything after a car
or a Disney character,Bambi,Herbie,Dora,ec t
cant help but laugh

Cobleskill, NY

#13 Mar 20, 2008
Oh Please how about Apple or Rumor some of these celebrity names are horrible. Poor kids!!
Laughing with you

United States

#14 Mar 20, 2008
Tallulah
Scout
Harlow

Celebrity names..WTF?
Anna-Lee

Salisbury, Australia

#15 Mar 20, 2008
I knew a girl called Gutsy Charlotte. If i ever need a stage name that is it.
anon

Redmond, WA

#16 Mar 20, 2008
People I have actually known:

Robin Bird
Anita Brain
T. Square
just a person

Latham, NY

#17 Mar 20, 2008
Sure-ok wrote:
Tercell,cellica anything after a car
or a Disney character,Bambi,Herbie,Dora,ec t
I knew a guy with the name of Edsel, and his mother always said her son came before the car!
Cant help but laugh

Cobleskill, NY

#18 Mar 20, 2008
Isn't there a local man named Bruce Bruce??
Adirondackboy

Memphis, TN

#19 Mar 20, 2008
What's in a name? Study shows that workplace discrimination begins long before the job seeker shows up for an interview

Black Issues in Higher Education, June 19, 2003 by Kendra Hamilton

Thinking of naming your child Keisha or Aisha? How about Rasheed or Tremayne? African American pars across the nation may have to think again, as a recent study has shown that workplace discrimination begins long before the job seeker shows up for an interview.

Indeed, it seems to be in play from the moment the resume hits the human resource manager's desk.

Dr. Marianne Bertrand, a professor of economics at the University of Chicago, and Dr. Sendhil Mullainathan, MacArthur-winning associate professor of economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, have made a significant contribution to the research literature with their new study, "Are Emily and Brendan More Employable than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination."

With names chosen from birth records in Chicago and Boston, the researchers crafted sets of resumes--some of higher quality, some of lower--labeled them with either "White-sounding" or "Black-sounding" names and sent nearly 5,000 of them out in response to 1,300 jobs advertised in the Chicago and Boston papers.

The response from colleagues as they designed their deceptively simple study was, "'Oh, yes, you'll find a discrimination effect, a reverse discrimination effect,'" Bertrand says.

Instead, they found that resumes with "White-sounding" names--like Jay, Brad, Carrie and Kristen--were 50 percent more likely than those with "Black-sounding" names to receive a callback. The results were striking, holding both for jobs at the lower end of the spectrum--cashier and mailroom clerk positions--and for those at the executive level. Put another way, a White job seeker would have to send out at least 10 resumes to receive a single contact from a potential employer. A Black candidate, meanwhile, would have to send out 15--and this in a "soft" economy with a relatively low rate of new job creation.

The most intriguing--and troubling--aspect of the study was that the discrimination effect held even for candidates with stronger credentials: those who had gone to better schools, or won awards, or had fewer resume "gaps," periods of at least six months without employment.

"We really thought a higher quality resume would help the African American candidate--that the employer would put less weight on the names," Bertrand says
Adirondackboy

Memphis, TN

#20 Mar 20, 2008
And indeed, improving the resume quality helped candidates with White-sounding names significantly--their chances of receiving a callback rose 30 percent. But for candidates with Black-sounding names, "we found none of that. If anything, we found the opposite," Bertrand says.

"It was very counterintuitive," she adds. "One imagined employers looking at the names and kind of screening at that stage, not going any further, not even reading the resume. People in HR (human resources) call that a 'deselection process,' where you see a pile of resumes that you have to get through and do a kind of rapid screen" in order to separate the wheat from the chaff.

"That's exactly how we used to do it," notes Kimberly Wilson, who held a human resources position in a mid-sized social policy research firm in the Washington, D.C., area. It was Wilson's job to cull the stack of resumes--"perhaps around 300" for every position, she says--down to about 20 names that would then be brought before a committee.

"And every time, the committee would be more critical of resumes with Black-sounding or foreign-sounding names.'Oh, yes, she did a research internship, but it wasn't in health and that's what we're really looking for,'" Wilson says. When the names didn't provide a clue to race, the committee members would often zero in on other data--professional organizations, for example.

"'Oh, he belonged to the Hispanic fellowship group in college," she adds, explaining, "I don't even think it was conscious, certainly not in most cases."

Conscious or not, the MIT-UChicago study demonstrates that employers actively discriminate among job candidates on the basis of race. And attempts by African Americans to improve their chances with more education and more skills don't appear to help at all.

In addition, the study showed that:

Adjusting for gender greatly increased the discrimination effect. There was a difference of 3.35 percentage points--or 50 percent--between the callback rates for all Whites (10.1 percent) and all Blacks (6.7 percent). But the callback rate for the lowest scoring Black female name, Aisha (2.2 percent) was 6.1 percentage points below that of the lowest scoring White female name, Emily (8.3 percent) and 11.4 percentage points below that of the highest scoring White female name. Indeed, five of the nine Black female names--Aisha, Keisha, Tamika, Lakisha and Tanisha--scored lower than the lowest scoring White female name. By contrast, the racial gap between male names was not nearly so pronounced. The lowest scoring White and Black male names--Neil and Rasheed--were only 3.6 percentage points apart.

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