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21 - 40 of 43 Comments Last updated Mar 18, 2009
writer

Cobleskill, NY

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#21
Jul 9, 2008
 
FlippingYouOff wrote:
<quoted text>
it's hydrogen sulfide.
it's a gas that is given off during the paper making process and subsequent water treatment process.
no, it doesn't poison fields. It oxidizes quickly which means it disperses quickly.
Has anyone come across this smell at other paper mills? I thought I smelled it once outside of New York City. It's very unique, memorable!

The "poisoning" is probably too harsh a word, and I didn't mean to connect it to the odor. I've heard from a very in-the-know source that corn produced a few years ago in the fields below the Fort were tainted with mycotoxins, which grew inside the corn, rather than after it was harvested. A number of cattle died as a result. A local farmer told my friend that it was possibly due to heavy metals that fell from the smoke years ago, before stricter rules were in place. And that it can be corrected through growing different crops.

I'm not looking for a fight with IP, that's for sure!
writer

Cobleskill, NY

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#22
Jul 9, 2008
 
Suggestions wrote:
Have you consider setting up a blog or a website? I think it might be a good start. Also, I think you might be more feedback than you will from this site. Just some thoughts.
P.S. Didn't your grandmother have an unusual nickname??
<quoted text>
I figured I'd use this blog site since so many Ticonderogans are already on it. Can't afford to set up a website of my own, but maybe that will come.

I'd love to know her nickname. All I've heard of is Perma-Pressed (because her skin was so un-wrinkled, maybe, due to her famous parasols?) If you know of a better one, please tell. It's all in the past and will not hurt my feelings. But it will genuinely help.
HarSee

AOL

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#23
Jul 9, 2008
 

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Thanks for asking me to be more specific. Because I want so much information I realize I'm being vague.

The thing I'd like most are the day to day stories of working at the Fort, especially the Pavilion. My grandparents were John and Pyrma Pell, and they were special characters. They lived in the Pavilion in the summer for most of their lives, until he died in 1987.(At that point the Fort Association took over management of everything, and my family's way of life, the garden parties and elegant country lifestyle, came to an end.) They were loved by some, hated by many. I loved them of course but am objective, and am dying to reconnect with the people who worked with them. I know there are a million anecdotes of their bizarre lifestyle and the demands they made on staff. I've always wondered how hard it must have been for the town residents to don maid's uniforms and take orders from my granny, who was not a very sensitive person, let's say.

Their "reign" at Fort Ti ended 20 years ago, which is a long time, but not so long that there's no one left living who was there. Please don't be shy about sharing your experiences.

An example: someone - in the late 70's or early 80's - wrote something raunchy in the lead trough which is still in the King's Garden, about my granny. We always assumed it was kitchen staff that she had really p***** off (as usual). And that she probably deserved it. I'd give anything to know the story behind the event that inspired it, etc. I hope it was an employee, rather than a cousin, but if it was, I really don't care. I'm not looking to pick new or pick up old fights, just to record the true history of the place and maybe even heal some old wounds.
I know someone who could probably be of a great deal of help to you, but am anot able to publish it in this forum. If you are interested, indicate to me, and we'll possibly be able to get together in some other venue. My family is at leat 5th or 6th generation affiliated with the Fort and I know a lot of folks who know a lot about it. If interested, leave a note and somehow we'll connect, providing my family member would be willing to talk to you.
talk to

Ballston Spa, NY

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#24
Jul 9, 2008
 

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writer wrote:
<quoted text>
Has anyone come across this smell at other paper mills? I thought I smelled it once outside of New York City. It's very unique, memorable!
The "poisoning" is probably too harsh a word, and I didn't mean to connect it to the odor. I've heard from a very in-the-know source that corn produced a few years ago in the fields below the Fort were tainted with mycotoxins, which grew inside the corn, rather than after it was harvested. A number of cattle died as a result. A local farmer told my friend that it was possibly due to heavy metals that fell from the smoke years ago, before stricter rules were in place. And that it can be corrected through growing different crops.
I'm not looking for a fight with IP, that's for sure!
Try Penny Wise here on Topix.
writer

Cobleskill, NY

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#25
Jul 9, 2008
 
HarSee wrote:
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Thanks for asking me to be more specific. Because I want so much information I realize I'm being vague.
The thing I'd like most are the day to day stories of working at the Fort, especially the Pavilion. My grandparents were John and Pyrma Pell, and they were special characters. They lived in the Pavilion in the summer for most of their lives, until he died in 1987.(At that point the Fort Association took over management of everything, and my family's way of life, the garden parties and elegant country lifestyle, came to an end.) They were loved by some, hated by many. I loved them of course but am objective, and am dying to reconnect with the people who worked with them. I know there are a million anecdotes of their bizarre lifestyle and the demands they made on staff. I've always wondered how hard it must have been for the town residents to don maid's uniforms and take orders from my granny, who was not a very sensitive person, let's say.
Their "reign" at Fort Ti ended 20 years ago, which is a long time, but not so long that there's no one left living who was there. Please don't be shy about sharing your experiences.
An example: someone - in the late 70's or early 80's - wrote something raunchy in the lead trough which is still in the King's Garden, about my granny. We always assumed it was kitchen staff that she had really p***** off (as usual). And that she probably deserved it. I'd give anything to know the story behind the event that inspired it, etc. I hope it was an employee, rather than a cousin, but if it was, I really don't care. I'm not looking to pick new or pick up old fights, just to record the true history of the place and maybe even heal some old wounds.
I know someone who could probably be of a great deal of help to you, but am anot able to publish it in this forum. If you are interested, indicate to me, and we'll possibly be able to get together in some other venue. My family is at leat 5th or 6th generation affiliated with the Fort and I know a lot of folks who know a lot about it. If interested, leave a note and somehow we'll connect, providing my family member would be willing to talk to you.
I set up an email address ticonderogabook@aol.com for this purpose. Email me there and we'll talk. Thanks so much!
FlippingYouOff

Pittsfield, MA

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#26
Jul 9, 2008
 
writer wrote:
<quoted text>
Has anyone come across this smell at other paper mills?
yes.
most that use the kraft process.
I remember Bowater in Calhoun Tennessee stunk so bad you sped through the town just to get away from it.
writer

Cobleskill, NY

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#27
Jul 9, 2008
 
Choose to be happy- wrote:
I think it would be a much bigger honor to the fort and to the people who loved it to focus on what made it, and them, so great, and worth remembering. Why focus on the negative? If you want juicy tidbits and scandal, pick up a tabloid and dish on Hollywood; surely the legacy of the fort, this town, and all of the people involved, past and present, should be remembered as one of greatness- not gossip.
I genuinely do intend to honor the Fort's memory. No one loved it more than me, but the bottom line is this is my story, not the Fort's. The Fort's history has been documented, and nothing that's happened in my life supercedes that incredible legacy.
writer

Cobleskill, NY

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#28
Jul 9, 2008
 

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FlippingYouOff wrote:
i think you had better rethink the purpose behind your book because something like what you have in mind will come back to bite you in the ass.
Did you ever read an American author named Thomas Wolfe? He wrote a book about a guy who wrote a book about his hometown. It was fairly successful and when the guy came back to his hometown, people were none too pleased about the way they were portrayed or the skeletons that had been dragged out of a bunch of closets.
It was aptly titled, "You Can Never Go Home Again". You might want to give this a read and second guess your reasons for writing this book and make sure that you are willing to take that risk of being ostracized...
I appreciate the warning and have thought about the downside for years. It's what's kept me from writing sooner. For better or worse I have already come home again. I decided at age 18 that I would move to Ticonderoga when I got "old". I love this town, love the Adirondacks, the climate, the quiet, the people, the privacy, the roots I have at the Fort, and wanted to share it with my kids before it was too late. A small town like Ti is not an easy place to move to under any circumstances, it's pretty closed to newcomers. But I lead a quiet life, am just a mom right now, and don't seek out popularity. I hope this book will reconnect me with old friends and that I'll make new ones, but I don't expect to please everybody. But then, when does one ever please everyone? And I don't intend to expose the skeletons in other people's closets, just my own.
writer

Cobleskill, NY

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#29
Jul 9, 2008
 
FlippingYouOff wrote:
<quoted text>
yes.
most that use the kraft process.
I remember Bowater in Calhoun Tennessee stunk so bad you sped through the town just to get away from it.
Thanks for this info about the process, that's the first I've heard about it.
stop

Ballston Spa, NY

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#30
Jul 9, 2008
 

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writer wrote:
<quoted text>
I genuinely do intend to honor the Fort's memory. No one loved it more than me, but the bottom line is this is my story, not the Fort's. The Fort's history has been documented, and nothing that's happened in my life supercedes that incredible legacy.
Who would be interested in your book, an more to the point why?
writer

Cobleskill, NY

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#31
Jul 9, 2008
 

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stop wrote:
<quoted text>Who would be interested in your book, an more to the point why?
Not sure yet exactly who will read it, just hope a lot of people do. Why? Because they're interested?
writer

Cobleskill, NY

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#32
Jul 10, 2008
 

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stop wrote:
<quoted text>Who would be interested in your book, an more to the point why?
Dear Porter Corners, you've had a strong negative reaction to me or the book idea. Can you tell me why?
you know

Ballston Spa, NY

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#33
Jul 10, 2008
 

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writer wrote:
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Dear Porter Corners, you've had a strong negative reaction to me or the book idea. Can you tell me why?
I too am a Pell........the shame.
writer

Cobleskill, NY

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#34
Jul 10, 2008
 

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How are we related? I don't think I know of anyone in Porter Corners. What shame? You certainly weren't a part of the family dynamics I'm writing about. If you're a distant cousin, have no fear, there won't be anything about you in my book.
you know

Ballston Spa, NY

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#35
Jul 10, 2008
 

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writer wrote:
How are we related? I don't think I know of anyone in Porter Corners. What shame? You certainly weren't a part of the family dynamics I'm writing about. If you're a distant cousin, have no fear, there won't be anything about you in my book.
I'm the bastard love grandchild of Ferris.
writer

Cobleskill, NY

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#36
Jul 10, 2008
 
I have no idea what you mean ~ sorry to show my lack of genaealogy knowledge if you're on the level. I'd really like to talk with you though. You sound interesting and interested in this subject. Email me at ticonderogabook@aol.com if you care to have a serious conversation.
writer

Cobleskill, NY

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#37
Jul 11, 2008
 

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Ok you're going to make me beg?

If you are the cousin I think you may be, I know how fond you and your parents were of my grandparents, and they of you. Please don't believe I'd do anything to hurt their memory. If anything I'd like to restore and repair it...they've been erased from Fort and Pavilion history, and in some cases maligned. They were parents and grandparents though, very human, complex and imperfect, and my relationship with them is mine alone.

Also, I have no interest in running down the Fort or getting involved in the mess there. I did not help create it, and sadly I'm not going to be the one to fix it. Believe me, I would if I could.
your name

Pattersonville, NY

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#38
Jul 11, 2008
 

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What I don't get "writer" is why aren't you posting your name? This all sounds a little sketchy...don't agree to meet this person for real and
It all sounds boring and who cares about your family so much. The old timers who do know will be dead by the time you publish anyway.

Read the Little Maid of Ticonderoga by Lousia May Olcott (yes the Little Women author) a really awesome account of a little girl at the fort back in the hey day.
your name

Pattersonville, NY

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#39
Jul 11, 2008
 

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Oops wrong author
It was authored by Alice Curtis
1929
writer

Cobleskill, NY

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#40
Jul 11, 2008
 

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The book I'm writing is my personal life story. My name is Debbie, that should be enough for you if you know my family or relatives you can check with.(I'm not looking to set up meetings with anyone. Though I do look forward to a meeting soon with some of our old friends who worked in the Pavilion and who don't seem as alarmed by the concept as my book as some posting here do, for reasons that escape me. And who know I'm not anyone to be afraid of. If you'd like more personal imformation and are willing to identify yourself, please contact me at ticonderogabook@aol.com.)

A book of one 51-year-old divorcee's personal memoires does sound boring, and I hope mine is not. I've had a lot of unusual twists of fate and burdens to overcome unrelated to Fort Ti or Pell relations though, and I enjoy writing. I hope that you don't begrudge anyone with an artistic drive to express themselves.

The reason I asked for help writing a book about the Fort is because key aspects of my life took place there. I want to record details of life from the perspectives of other people, as using only my recollections would make the book a lot less interesting. I'm looking for details and remembrances that have been lost since the house, the Pavilion was closed down in 1987. It alone is an interesting piece of American history. It is possibly the first "second home" in New York state, and the land, including the Fort ruins up on the hill, was bought specifically for the purpose of building a picturesque lakefront summer home, by William Ferris Pell. Sadly his son Archibald was killed in a very tragic and graphic way. He had set up a cannon shoot on the front lawn to greet his father, returning home by boat on his birthday. The cannon exploded and killed the boy, who is buried on the property. Heartbroken, William couldn't go back, and the house was leased and became a hotel, later.(The house was not built to be a hotel as is the predominant story told now).

At the turn of the last century the Fort and land were bought by my great-grandparents, Stephen and Sarah Pell. It had been divided into shares owned by a number of Pell descendants, was on the verge of being developed or sold to the state. Stephen and Sarah had the foresight to save the place, rebuild the Fort, create a museum intended to teach children American history, preserve the natural grounds and battlefields from development, and restore the summer home. It is a national treasure and piece of important architecture in it's own right. My grandmother had it decorated by Sister Parrish who also decorated the White House for Jackie Kennedy. The King's Garden is the oldest formal garden in the United States under continuous cultivation.(At least it was until it was somewhat untended for a time after my grandparents died. Strangely, this fact is no longer in information one reads about the Fort, rather, the accounts make it sound like it was untended during the time my grandparents lived there, which is absurd. And the Pavilion is used as a storage facility, rather than as part of the museum experience.)

If you don't care about my family, I understand that. So don't worry about my project. I'm not writing the book for the old-timers, I'm telling a uniquely American story and I hope the book turns out well and sells. If you have nothing to contribute, ok. But I hope you're just a skeptic and that you actually do. The more voices expressed the better, as it is the multiple stories played out there that make it such an interesting place. The stories of those who worked or visited there are as important as mine.

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