Teachers have a plan for school in Sy...

Teachers have a plan for school in Sylmar

There are 221 comments on the LA Daily News story from May 7, 2010, titled Teachers have a plan for school in Sylmar. In it, LA Daily News reports that:

Mauricio Regalado is one of the new breed of teachers at Sylmar High School. A group of teachers and their students at Sylmar High School are fostering a new way of learning that is separate from the traditional high school campus.

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Let me guess

United States

#1 May 8, 2010
When they say that they "don't need teachers, they need revolutinaries," I assume the mean those more akin to Che than to Washington. Lets see... spearheaded by "Mexican-american teacher of the year," public meeting held at Tia Chuchas Centro de Cultural...
What really makes this choice is that they use for support... " lower student performance low-income and minority students often have in comparison to white and Asian peers" Yes! right on the money. Those rich white and asian kids are doing so well, we should emulate them with hispano-cultural themed education. Oh, and the chance of "The Great Gatsby" being used at this scholl is about zero. Nice misdirection, though.
normanmoore

United States

#2 May 8, 2010
Let me guess wrote:
When they say that they "don't need teachers, they need revolutinaries," I assume the mean those more akin to Che than to Washington. Lets see... spearheaded by "Mexican-american teacher of the year," public meeting held at Tia Chuchas Centro de Cultural...
What really makes this choice is that they use for support... " lower student performance low-income and minority students often have in comparison to white and Asian peers" Yes! right on the money. Those rich white and asian kids are doing so well, we should emulate them with hispano-cultural themed education. Oh, and the chance of "The Great Gatsby" being used at this scholl is about zero. Nice misdirection, though.
Glenn Beck is railing against this every day on radio and TV. Students need the three R's along with science and a real view of history, especially American history. It is coming to a point where parents who care are going to be forced into home schooling in order that their kids get a useful and ethical education and not a lot of socialistic humanistic bullcrap.
Tech_Daddy

West Hollywood, CA

#3 May 8, 2010
A new school led by the same teachers that have been at the school for 10 years. Yeah, right! They have been a part of the problem as is the culture from which this school engenders. The bored member calls them "elegant"? WTF?

More BS from the union hacks. We shall see if they can do any better. I'm not taking bets. It's the CULTURE stoopid!

Break up LAUSD! Outlaw UTLA/AALA/CTA! Go Charters! Vouchers!
obama-sux

United States

#4 May 8, 2010
The reality most of these students don’t have much of a future, wasting their time teaching them Huamitas will do little to prepare them for the real world. These underperformance unskilled students are going to have to compete with the illegal immigrants for jobs that don’t pay very well whether they dropout or actually graduate.
What they should be teaching them is American Pride, English, Math, Science. Since most don’t qualify to get into a decent college the school should be trying to get them into some type of trade school, and hope they don’t become a burden to society.
Escape from LA

AOL

#5 May 8, 2010
The article says "The school will also operate under the district's humanities model".

It's "bout time the school started teaching those kids in Sylmar how to be human.
eric

Temecula, CA

#6 May 8, 2010
It doesnt matter what the teachers do. The parents of most these kids dont really care about anything they do. If they did, more than 50% would graduate. That low number is not so much a failure of LAUSD as it is a complete reflection of what these kids are shown by their parents..

The Northeast Valley had been going to hell for a atleast the last 2 decades.

If you are sending your kids to school their with hopes of a good education you would have a better chance of learning to ride a bike from a rubber doll..
Jose

United States

#7 May 8, 2010
Unfortunately Eric and Obama-sux post are correct. I graduated from Sylmar High and most of my former friends went to: the military, UPS, Ralphs, Office Depot, Olive View hospital (low level jobs), and Food 4 Less, all based in Sylmar. Some of them did go to CSUN, UCLA, and Berkeley but all the ones that went to UCLA flunked out. All the students that graduate from this school, including myself, can not compete against students from non-Mexican/Hispanic families. These kids have NO hope.

Do you know when to start learning science? It starts at home, at an early age, everyday including summer! The Mexican/Hispanic/Latino culture does NOT encourage learning. Throwing money into these programs will NOT work! Most of these kids will learn that education is important but when they are 40 years old with 4 kids, too late for any change.

But, hey we need low skill workers right?
The Mexican/Hispanic/Latino culture will always supply that because the uneducated will have 4-5 kids, while the educated ones will have 1-2 kids.

Before you call me racist, I am Mexican. I am just telling you how it is.
obama-sux wrote:
The reality most of these students don’t have much of a future, wasting their time teaching them Huamitas will do little to prepare them for the real world. These underperformance unskilled students are going to have to compete with the illegal immigrants for jobs that don’t pay very well whether they dropout or actually graduate.
What they should be teaching them is American Pride, English, Math, Science. Since most don’t qualify to get into a decent college the school should be trying to get them into some type of trade school, and hope they don’t become a burden to society.
Herb

Northridge, CA

#8 May 8, 2010
Jose, your post is awesome and makes more sense than most of what I see on the Daily News boards, though the other six posters on this topic also have the right idea, that a culture that resists education will find it hard to be educated. I have been saying this sort of thing on these boards for years, and like you, I try to show class and never descend to hate or race-baiting. Education "reformers" all subscribe to the romantic idea that teachers should be heroic or revolutionary, like Rafe Esquith or Jaime Escalante. These were/are examplary gentlemen, but the average teacher does not have that energy level, and should not have to be a hero but only a competent professional. What the reformers miss is what might be called the Fundamental Theorem of Education, that all teachers teach to the middle of their classes. If the middle is low, lots of educational opportunities slip by. I am struggling with the District philosophy that every child must take and pass algebra one. By the time they are in their second year (!) of ninth grade, if they are still in algebra one, the middle of that class is pretty low, and in that class there is little concept of paying attention, studying, or attending regularly. I have provided special narrowly focused materials and exhorted them to practice, practice, practice, but as they don't know arithmetic and missed so much basic algebra last semester, it at times becomes something less than teaching. I apologize to the taxpayers for taking their money for that hour every day. At least I keep trying. One or two out of 23 are getting it. But the class had 42 students in September, so you see what our dropout rate is.
Teacher

Saraland, AL

#9 May 8, 2010
As a former teacher in Sylmar, I am very proud of Mr. Regalado and Mr. Navarro in seeking new direction for the students. As educators, our hands are often tied by bureaucratic red tape, and even though we desperately want our students to succeed, there are many other factors that are constantly getting in the way. Of course, I also know that parental involvement is key, and I am hoping that this new school will seek to improve upon the lack of it.
Jackie Armbridge

Rancho Cucamonga, CA

#10 May 8, 2010
eric wrote:
It doesnt matter what the teachers do. The parents of most these kids dont really care about anything they do. If they did, more than 50% would graduate. That low number is not so much a failure of LAUSD as it is a complete reflection of what these kids are shown by their parents..
The Northeast Valley had been going to hell for a atleast the last 2 decades.
If you are sending your kids to school their with hopes of a good education you would have a better chance of learning to ride a bike from a rubber doll..
Unfortunately this is true. When I look back at my high school in LA it saddens me that the neighborhood has gone WAY down and last I read, over 50% of the students drop out of school. It's predominately Mexican of course...and this is what our country has to look forward to. Sad sad for our once great state and country!
Ceasar Rojas

Thousand Oaks, CA

#11 May 8, 2010
Humanitas is an established program with a good track record.

http://www.urbanedpartnership.org/humanitas.h...

I predict that the original Sylmar High School will lose about 400 to 500 of their best academic students.

While this will help reduce the severe overcrowding,
the students that remain at the Sylmar HS will be left with far fewer positive peer role models.

Of course the Humanitas students need to escape from the gang-infested and poorly administrated Sylmar HS.

The apartment buildings one block north of this school are notorious gang-crime locations.

Good luck to everyone: the good people (humanitas) and bad people (gang thugs).
Jackie Armbridge

Rancho Cucamonga, CA

#12 May 8, 2010
Jose wrote:
Unfortunately Eric and Obama-sux post are correct. I graduated from Sylmar High and most of my former friends went to: the military, UPS, Ralphs, Office Depot, Olive View hospital (low level jobs), and Food 4 Less, all based in Sylmar. Some of them did go to CSUN, UCLA, and Berkeley but all the ones that went to UCLA flunked out. All the students that graduate from this school, including myself, can not compete against students from non-Mexican/Hispanic families. These kids have NO hope.
Do you know when to start learning science? It starts at home, at an early age, everyday including summer! The Mexican/Hispanic/Latino culture does NOT encourage learning. Throwing money into these programs will NOT work! Most of these kids will learn that education is important but when they are 40 years old with 4 kids, too late for any change.
But, hey we need low skill workers right?
The Mexican/Hispanic/Latino culture will always supply that because the uneducated will have 4-5 kids, while the educated ones will have 1-2 kids.
Before you call me racist, I am Mexican. I am just telling you how it is.
<quoted text>
You're 100% correct! I too am of Mexican descent, 3rd generation. I've seen what has happened to my old neighborhood and especially the schools I attended and it's truly sad! My high school is nothing like what it was in the 80's when I was there. I don't know what it is about the Mexican/Hispanic/Latino culture and the lack of appreciation for an education. This whole idea of a Mexican takeover of California is ridiculous. How can any state function with a society where the majority of the people lack an education? Many illegal immigrants have been here for years and don't even bother to learn English. Their kids see that and are not encouraged by their families to get an education. Throw money that the state doesn't have at these programs, just know it won't help! It has to start at home, and unfortunately for the majority of the students in that area, it doesn't.
catalyst

Lake Hughes, CA

#14 May 8, 2010
Tech_Daddy wrote:
A new school led by the same teachers that have been at the school for 10 years. Yeah, right! They have been a part of the problem as is the culture from which this school engenders. The bored member calls them "elegant"?****?
More BS from the union hacks. We shall see if they can do any better. I'm not taking bets. It's the CULTURE stoopid!
Break up LAUSD! Outlaw UTLA/AALA/CTA! Go Charters! Vouchers!
I wondered about the "bored" member using "elegant." Maybe she meant "eloquent." But then again, maybe her misuse of vocabulary is due to the fact that she is also a product of LAUSD!
ENFORCE

Santa Ana, CA

#15 May 9, 2010
It's all about La Raza when it comes down to it. Teach them in Spanish and forget any Math,Science, American History, well teach them Mexican History that focuses on Mexican History as La Raza preaches the Southwest U.S. was illegally lost in a war to the United States. All taxpayers can help fund the indoctrination of the Latino student body Viva La Raza. Put up Mexican flags, all documents in Spanish. Only in America would we ever see a foreign nation come in and teach about thier culture over American culture.
Teacher

United States

#16 May 9, 2010
If you haven't been in a classroom in the last 10 years then you have no say in the matter. This includes administrators. Instead of critizing hard-working educators, why don't you try it for yourselves, and at a struggling school, not at a school that continues to produce "successful students." There are so many problems with public education (and I mean real public education, not charters, I worked for one, I know what they do to make their test scores appear so outstanding), and yes the unions are part of it as well... but we need to start somewhere! And as far as the Mexican-American comments go, who do you think these students will be able to relate to more, some teacher from the west valley who attended El Camino, or someone from their own neighborhood who became a success against all odds. As for myself, I saw the Great Gatsby party, and it was amazing!!
John Grande

Los Angeles, CA

#17 May 9, 2010
After reading these impassioned posts, one thought comes to mind: thank goodness none of you were my teachers! Your lack of respect and compassion toward others is clear and is as dangerous to our republican experiment as the thousands of young people that leave our schools unprepared to contribute to society.
Tech_Daddy

West Hollywood, CA

#18 May 9, 2010
Teacher wrote:
If you haven't been in a classroom in the last 10 years then you have no say in the matter. This includes administrators. Instead of critizing hard-working educators, why don't you try it for yourselves, and at a struggling school, not at a school that continues to produce "successful students." There are so many problems with public education (and I mean real public education, not charters, I worked for one, I know what they do to make their test scores appear so outstanding), and yes the unions are part of it as well... but we need to start somewhere! And as far as the Mexican-American comments go, who do you think these students will be able to relate to more, some teacher from the west valley who attended El Camino, or someone from their own neighborhood who became a success against all odds. As for myself, I saw the Great Gatsby party, and it was amazing!!
If this "community" was for education and integration, then they would not care about who teaches them. It's La Raza or nothing! This school is a sewer because of the "community" and the parents that don't give a damn. It's also the "culture" that says doing well in school and life means you have sold out. They want to be separate from the rest of U.S. The unions only saw that letting illegals into our schools brought more teaching jobs and more union dues. The teachers and their unions now have a failure on their hands and refuse to acknowledge that they had a part in the dumbing down of a one fine LAUSD. BTW, I've been to this school, I've seen first hand what a dysfunctional mess this place is. Break up LAUSD! Outlaw UTLA/AALA/CTA! Go Charters! Choice is good! Vouchers!
pioneer

Garden Grove, CA

#19 May 9, 2010
Why can't we acknowledge and applaud the fact that someone is taking a stand for better education in our community. Some of the comments said above are negative and time wasting. We should be finding solutions for these kids, as the teachers are, and not criticizing and bringing down a plan of better education in our community. The way I see it, not all kids will have the opportunity and support for higher education, but if programs like these do put kids in college and educate them, then one day they will come back and mentor education in communities of color. Many times people are able to enroll in college and graduate because of mentorship, everyone remembers that one person that believed in them. This is what some of the kids need, a “culture” for higher education and success, and someone to believe in them.
obama-sux

United States

#20 May 9, 2010
It's not so much that these students don't need a good education, it's more of what is being taught and what will this education do for them out in the real world. Learning about F. Scott Fitzgerald and his publish works may have a place in school, but it should not be force upon students who have limited time, recourses and enthusiasm for learning. Getting into a good college does not start in high school when you are struggling in remedial classes, It starts in preschool with parents encouraging their child to do well and making sure that they are in fact doing well, and if they are not find out why? And fix it right away. All of the top colleges and Universities that most people can afford or get scholarships or grants are extremely difficult to get into even with the right classes, the good grades and high SAT scores. If you have parents with money you could go to USC or some other private college that have lenient prerequisites and the degree actually be worth something, or perhaps SCUN or CALSATE LA but SCUN and CALSTATE LA degrees don’t hold very much water in the real world. Now, the truth of the matter these students need to be able to do something that can translate into a productive life and a meaningful future, the only solution is to get them ready for some type of trade school in which they can achieve.
pioneer wrote:
Why can't we acknowledge and applaud the fact that someone is taking a stand for better education in our community. Some of the comments said above are negative and time wasting. We should be finding solutions for these kids, as the teachers are, and not criticizing and bringing down a plan of better education in our community. The way I see it, not all kids will have the opportunity and support for higher education, but if programs like these do put kids in college and educate them, then one day they will come back and mentor education in communities of color. Many times people are able to enroll in college and graduate because of mentorship, everyone remembers that one person that believed in them. This is what some of the kids need, a “culture” for higher education and success, and someone to believe in them.
Same Olde

Honolulu, HI

#21 May 9, 2010
I applaud these teachers for trying something different. But I fear that they are barking up the wrong tree. I suppose it is necessary to teach to your audience, and the district guidelines do not allow for much of that in their generic, sanitized curriculum. But I have a big fear that this "new" school will become the "Hispanic Academy" and will not prepare these students for the big world. Lower the standards or teaching to the test. New ideas and teaching theories are absolutely required to fix the education system we have, but the big picture needs to be looked at.

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