Who do you support for U.S. Senate in...
TSF

Holly Springs, NC

#41953 Aug 19, 2013
Just did some checking: Results:
Think Like a Baby-pre-school prep NYC tuition $29,800 per year

Convent of The Sacred Heart NYC tuition $32,680 per year

The Becken School NYC tuition $26,000 per year

Accredited Online School (Quaker) NYC tuition $30, 450 per year

The list goes on.

Didn't find the school with tuition of $5000. Which one is it?

+
I Hate Syracuse wrote:
<quoted text>With all due respect, funding has little to do with schooling. Look at NYC schools where it costs $18,000 per child to educate a public school kid, and they have some of the worst results in the nation. Where, their Catholic school counterparts ‘charge’$5,000 per child with much better results. This is because; you cannot put a price on motivation. If you want to be a failure, public schooling has a seat for your child. If you want to be successful, public schooling also has a seat for your child. Unfortunately, children that want to work hard are often ostracized for being high achievers.
TSF

Holly Springs, NC

#41954 Aug 19, 2013
The longest time I have ever allow a lazy incompetent employee to stay on my job was 5 days. I AM STILL ANGRY WITH MYSELF FOR THAT AND IT HAS BEEN YEARS. He cost me one of my best customers and I could never fix it.. I keep hearing the myth of extensive numbers of lazy incompetent teacher, but I have never encountered more than 3, and they were fired immediately. Who are and where are these alleged individuals?
Now if the school to which Syracuse refers charges $5000 per year per student per year, and they are not being subsidized by a church, etc., it definitely is NOT being run like a business. The only businesses that get subsidies are those who are large enough to bribe legislators into voting them subsidies. So, without subsidies, the alleged school in question has no room for profit. If that school were run like a business, their tuition would be more in line with their competitors. So without more information, I am ready to throw the BS flag.
State of Denial wrote:
<quoted text>
Syracuse beat me to the punch.
Private schools are run like a business. If Johnny or Jane can pass their entrance testing and their parents have the money to pay tuition, it doesn't matter about race, gender, religion or political affiliation. As Syracuse stated there's a seat there and also expectations by private schools regarding the students and teachers' performance.
Do you have a problem with teachers in a private school setting being held to a standard where their classroom performance is as important as the students attending?
You state Republicans want their "special" children insulated from the frustrations of life. Do you honestly think only Republicans send their children to private school?
I don't know what you do for a living but if you run a business, would you hire and keep incompetent employees? Would your employees be rewarded for excellent or exemplary performance? No less should be asked of any teacher in a classroom, private or public. Public schools need to run as a business, the business of educating. As employers are not there to make employees feel good about their lives that suck nine times out of ten, neither should school teachers be asked to do more than educate. Children have parents and it's their job to build their child's esteem, be involved in their education and let them know that hard work will pay off whether it's in the classroom, sports, later in college, and on down the road in the business of life.
I'll give on the fact public schools have to take everyone, but the state does provide for children with learning problems. Children with learning disabilities should be provided with teachers and tools in that area of teaching and I think public school does a good job with this challenge.
TSF

Holly Springs, NC

#41955 Aug 19, 2013
Egypt? I would stop all subsidies to Egypt immediately and either spend the money on OUR crumbling infrastructure or use it to pay down the principal on the national debt. To hell with Egypt.
If the republikans want to borrow more money from China to prosecute another war of intervention, CONGRESS has the power to declare war. Would China agree to finance that? I don't know.
Dang wrote:
<quoted text>NC Democrat! Typical, when you are wrong,(ID issue) you just shove your head deeper and act like the question was never posed. Your points from now on are subject to all the ridicule that can be thrown your way. It's like the current administration saying the Egypt situation is too complicated to explain. BS. If they can't explain it, then they don't need to be making the decisions on the matter.
State of Denial

Charlotte, NC

#41956 Aug 19, 2013
TSF wrote:
That is a new one for me. Which NC public school has transgender bathrooms?
<quoted text>
None yet thankfully that I found. Another waste of my tax dollars because some screwed up kid can't decide if he's a she or she's a he. Don't bathrooms have stalls with doors that close and are private. Be gay, lesbian, transgender whatever, I don't care. I do care about my tax dollars being spent for these "special" people to ensure their comfort. How about ensuring the comfort of heterosexuals by not pissing away tax dollars on someone's choice of sexual identity.

I don't even like to see parking spots for pregnant women. Pregnancy is a condition, not a sickness. I see pregnant women walking the mall, walking tracks, at sporting events and the likes. If they can do all this walking, I'd say it's not a stretch to make it inside the grocery store.


http://ideas.time.com/2013/04/01/transgender-...

Did find this. Probably coming to our state soon.
Dang

Greer, SC

#41957 Aug 19, 2013
(Newser)– With school budgets being slashed across the country, more and more teachers are paying for classroom supplies with their own money, according to a new study. The survey, by Horace Mann insurance, found 26% of teachers polled reported spending $400 of their own hard-earned on school supplies last year—up 3% from 2011—and 53% said their school's budget had been cut, reports USA Today. DonorsChoose.org , a charity that helps teachers raise money for supplies, says requests from teachers grew 30% last year.

A 23-year-old elementary school teacher in North Carolina says she does babysitting work on the side to help buy extra supplies for her classroom. "I only have $100 from the school for the whole year to buy supplies, and it's not enough," she tells USA Today. "I even had to buy shelves and a stool for the kids to stand on to wash their hands at the sink." "Of course we're not forced to spend our money," says another teacher in Indiana. "But some of these kids don't even get breakfast before they come to school, so we buy them snacks and treats." Who says I'm not fair and balanced?!
Dang

Greer, SC

#41958 Aug 19, 2013
That being said, I wonder how many complaining, will go to the website and help out with a donation?

“Vote Republican”

Since: Aug 08

Wyandanch, NY

#41959 Aug 19, 2013
TSF wrote:
Apparently you fail to understand the realities of the "choice" being offered in NC. NC will give your child's private school $4200 if you will take them out of public schools. The true cost of private school attendance is somewhere on the average of $10,00 to $12,000 per year for a high schooler. So the parent's cost in reality would be around $6000 per year per child. The working parents here generally cannot afford that, especially with around 10% unemployment. Additionally, there are few private schools available and the legislature has decreed that the private school teachers need not be educated themselves or even be subject to a criminal background check. What could possibly go wrong with that?
<quoted text>
The cost of a private education is around $10,000 to $12,000?? I am sure you are wrong. The ‘cost’ of a private education is whatever they want to charge. This is dependent on their expenses; the greatest expense being teacher salaries. There are some that earn 6 figures, but most earn less than their public school counterparts. How do you account for a typical Catholic school education costing less the $5,000 a year, when a public education in the same city is $18,000?

And, I believe you missed my point entirely, which was; the cost of education is not as important as what motivates the child to want an education. Poor kids who want an education will succeed because they are motivated. Rich kids who do not want to go to school will not likely go too far because they are not motivated in spite of being afforded every privilege.

“Vote Republican”

Since: Aug 08

Wyandanch, NY

#41960 Aug 19, 2013
TSF wrote:
So defunding public schools and forgetting education for the masses is the answer? I have little knowledge of NY schools and the only reason I have ever or would ever be in NY is because of having occasional connector flights there when I have to take airlines..
You are 100% right about motivation. I am well pleased with the education my children and relatives received in public schools.. Their success speaks for itself and for the availability of learning--- if the individual wants it.
Nothing short of divine intervention can help those determined to be criminals and addicts, regardless of the schools or teachers..
<quoted text>
No, defunding public schools is not the answer, but making them ‘independent’ and forcing them to compete is the answer. We are also relatively happy with the ‘results’ of our children. Public schools are accountable to no one. But, if their jobs were dependent on the success of students, there would have a different experience. I can take my children from Marvin, and move them to Weddington or Sun Valley. I can move them from Monroe to Porter Ridge, for any reason that I choose. And, as kids migrate for whatever reason, the schools left behind are forced to shape up, become attractive, or get on the unemployment line.

Stop hiring teachers and hire professionals. I want my kid taking biology from a degreed biologist. And, I want that teacher being paid a salary that is consistent with her profession.
Dang

Greer, SC

#41961 Aug 19, 2013
"A database of 200 million Electronic Benefit Transfer records from January 2011 to July 2012, obtained by The Post through a Freedom of Information request, showed welfare recipients using their EBT cards to make dozens of cash withdrawals at ATMs inside Hank’s Saloon in Brooklyn; the Blue Door Video porn shop in the East Village; The Anchor, a sleek SoHo lounge; the Patriot Saloon in TriBeCa; and Drinks Galore, a liquor distributor in The Bronx." "The percentage of Americans selling their food stamps back to stores for cash has increased by 30 percent over the past several years, according to a new Agriculture Department study." Is it a wonder that kids go to school hungry?

“Vote Republican”

Since: Aug 08

Wyandanch, NY

#41962 Aug 19, 2013
TSF wrote:
Just did some checking: Results:
Think Like a Baby-pre-school prep NYC tuition $29,800 per year
Convent of The Sacred Heart NYC tuition $32,680 per year
The Becken School NYC tuition $26,000 per year
Accredited Online School (Quaker) NYC tuition $30, 450 per year
The list goes on.
Didn't find the school with tuition of $5000. Which one is it?
+<quoted text>
Great find, yes NYC has some elite schools with tuition rates that exceed many colleges and universities. I am speaking of the typical and local Catholic education. These schools have rates that are well below the city system. Now, these schools do not have to contend with teachers salaries because they are being taught by Nuns.

My brother put himself through St. Johns on Long Island in the early 90s. He paid for it himself, and his tuition was $1,900 including books. We were very poor, and he was more motivated than poor. He ended up going to a sh!tty college, but his SAT scores were also crap. He went to Buffalo State College to be near me. I attended and played for the University at Buffalo. We open up with Ohio State this year, wish us luck.
State of Denial

Charlotte, NC

#41963 Aug 19, 2013
Dang wrote:
(Newser)– With school budgets being slashed across the country, more and more teachers are paying for classroom supplies with their own money, according to a new study. The survey, by Horace Mann insurance, found 26% of teachers polled reported spending $400 of their own hard-earned on school supplies last year—up 3% from 2011—and 53% said their school's budget had been cut, reports USA Today. DonorsChoose.org , a charity that helps teachers raise money for supplies, says requests from teachers grew 30% last year.
A 23-year-old elementary school teacher in North Carolina says she does babysitting work on the side to help buy extra supplies for her classroom. "I only have $100 from the school for the whole year to buy supplies, and it's not enough," she tells USA Today. "I even had to buy shelves and a stool for the kids to stand on to wash their hands at the sink." "Of course we're not forced to spend our money," says another teacher in Indiana. "But some of these kids don't even get breakfast before they come to school, so we buy them snacks and treats." Who says I'm not fair and balanced?!
It's called free breakfast and lunch, per the government. I don't have a problem with this at all. Times are hard and I never want to see a child hungry.

All over the local and national news there's been numerous stories about providing school supplies for underprivileged children.

Maybe there should be school supplies drives for supplies for teachers who don't have enough. JUST maybe the government doesn't have to provide children with Ipads and computers and that would be a great savings for regular classroom supplies.

Do you not think if the teacher only has $100 for classroom supplies SOMEONE in the public school system might need to look around and decide teachers need chalk and other items for the classroom. Hell, I don't have an Ipad and I can afford one. Our children have come far too dependent upon computerized methods of learning. How many kids do you think could make change at McDonalds or a grocery store if all computerized methods of math were taken away?

“Vote Republican”

Since: Aug 08

Wyandanch, NY

#41964 Aug 19, 2013
TSF wrote:
Just did some checking: Results:
Think Like a Baby-pre-school prep NYC tuition $29,800 per year
Convent of The Sacred Heart NYC tuition $32,680 per year
The Becken School NYC tuition $26,000 per year
Accredited Online School (Quaker) NYC tuition $30, 450 per year
The list goes on.
Didn't find the school with tuition of $5000. Which one is it?
+<quoted text>
Yes, Rutgers Day costs more than Rutgers University. Princeton Day costs half as much as Princeton University. St Johns University costs as little as many in state schools in PA and NY. So, you will find a wide dichotomy. The point is, educational expenses vary and the public system has been ripping off the tax-payer for many decades relating success with a dollar, when it is not true. Giving a raise to the maintenance guy will not ensure that Johnny can work with standard deviations.

However, cutting music and art will compromise the educational experience. Administrators who earn $200,000 a year salaries when you have students with a 40% dropout rate need to be let go. Teachers in NYC fail the math regents at a 25% rate should never be in the classroom. That is because we hire failures in our school system. We hire people who could not pass college math, so they because math teachers. They could not pass accounting, so they became business educators. They could not play a trumpet, so they became music teachers.

So, we have unmotivated people teaching unmotivated kids. And, their parents in many cases are just as unmotivated.

“Vote Republican”

Since: Aug 08

Wyandanch, NY

#41965 Aug 19, 2013
TSF, I attribute the cost of education to an illusion. For example, I was speaking with a white privileged parent one day who told me our boys are some of the best lacrosse players in Union County, and likely NC. I told him; “No, our boys are among the best players who have parents who can afford to spend $2,400 for equipment, and another $1,100 for participating, and another $5,000 on hotel and other travel costs.” I’m sure there are some kids from (you name the inner city) who would kick both our kids’ butts if they were given the same opportunities. The illusion that our children are better because I have a little more cash is a joke. My kids will be successful because they are motivated. They will fail, because they are not motivated. However, because, I have greater resources, I have provided an incentive that help to motivate them. That my friend is not an illusion.
State of Denial

Charlotte, NC

#41966 Aug 19, 2013
This is a fine private school in Gaston County. They also provide financial aide.

http://www.gastonday.org/welcome
Splendid Tiger

Bakersville, NC

#41967 Aug 19, 2013
I Hate Syracuse wrote:
<quoted text>Great find, yes NYC has some elite schools with tuition rates that exceed many colleges and universities. I am speaking of the typical and local Catholic education. These schools have rates that are well below the city system. Now, these schools do not have to contend with teachers salaries because they are being taught by Nuns.
My brother put himself through St. Johns on Long Island in the early 90s. He paid for it himself, and his tuition was $1,900 including books. We were very poor, Iand he was more motivated than poor. He ended up going to a sh!tty college, but his SAT scores were also crap. He went to Buffalo State College to be near me. I attended and played for the University at Buffalo. We open up with Ohio State this year, wish us luck.
You will need a miracle buddy.Ohio State will grind yogi up like stale Cheetos.and spit you out like a bad loogie.Buffalo.What a town, cowering in the shadow of omnipresent NYC.
Dang

Greer, SC

#41968 Aug 19, 2013
State of Denial wrote:
<quoted text>
It's called free breakfast and lunch, per the government. I don't have a problem with this at all. Times are hard and I never want to see a child hungry.
All over the local and national news there's been numerous stories about providing school supplies for underprivileged children.
Maybe there should be school supplies drives for supplies for teachers who don't have enough. JUST maybe the government doesn't have to provide children with Ipads and computers and that would be a great savings for regular classroom supplies.
Do you not think if the teacher only has $100 for classroom supplies SOMEONE in the public school system might need to look around and decide teachers need chalk and other items for the classroom. Hell, I don't have an Ipad and I can afford one. Our children have come far too dependent upon computerized methods of learning. How many kids do you think could make change at McDonalds or a grocery store if all computerized methods of math were taken away?
Kids? "What is the average age of a McDonald's employee?
Email
We employ 91,500 people of all ages, from school leaving age to people in their 80s, who tell us that working at McDonald&#146;s helps keep them young.
We&#146;re one of the UK&#146;s biggest providers of first-time jobs and 42% of our employees are under 21. The average age of an hourly-paid employee is 20." http://www.mcdonalds.co.uk/ukhome/whatmakesmc... Now, 2 decades old and can not make change, we are doomed as a competing nation. Most countries in the urban areas have "street venders/markets". The people working them are forced to "think on their feet", just look at the straw market in the Bahama's. They do the percentage's in their head and quickly I might add, or they lose the sale.
Dang

Greer, SC

#41969 Aug 19, 2013
"Speaking of food, a sample budget put together by Visa Inc. and McDonald's Corp. is rocketing around the Internet. Most of the commentary suggests that McDonald's is heartless, and gauche, to suggest how its employees might live on the embarrassingly paltry wages that they are paid.(According to the Census Bureau's American Community Survey of 2009-11, median earnings for a fast-food worker were $18,564 a year.) The budget is based on two jobs, which has aroused special ire: Is McDonald's telling its employees to get a second job so they don’t have to pay them anything?" http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-07-18/mcdo...
Dang

Greer, SC

#41970 Aug 19, 2013
$18,5 a year, isn't that ABOVE the poverty line?
Dang

Greer, SC

#41971 Aug 19, 2013
"The McDonald's workforce skews young. The average age of a fast-food worker is almost 30 right now, but that’s because of the recession; in 2000, it was 22. The average McDonald's line worker is not planning to put two kids through college on their salary. Only a minority are trying to support just themselves exclusively on their minimum-wage paycheck; they are living with a spouse or partner who makes at least as much as they do, or with parents or other relatives who make more than minimum wage. Moreover, very few people stay in entry-level minimum-wage jobs for very long (though again, the Great Recession has made this happen more than it used to); those workers eventually get promoted or leave for a more promising job.

Those who don’t -- who actually try to support a family on minimum-wage paychecks -- will end up with substantial government support. They’ll get the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, the Earned Income Tax Credit and, in many places, they will now be eligible for Medicaid.

Is that going to be easy? No. But is it impossible? Also no, which we know because there are millions of people in this country doing it. Keep in mind that most McDonald's workers don’t live close to New York City or Washington, the sources of much of the commentary I’ve seen. These are, respectively, the first- and fourth-most-expensive cities in the country. In many areas, the median after-tax household income is not that far from that on the McDonald's worksheet, and it’s pretty easy to rent a room in a friend’s house for less than $600 a month. Memphis, Tenn., for example, has a median household income of $35,000, which, according to Paycheckcity.com ’s take-home calculator, would give a single person about $2,300 a month after taxes. And that’s the median -- 50 percent of the city is below that. You should not develop a theory of household finance that declares that the city of Memphis does not exist."

“Vote Republican”

Since: Aug 08

Wyandanch, NY

#41972 Aug 19, 2013
Splendid Tiger wrote:
<quoted text> You will need a miracle buddy.Ohio State will grind yogi up like stale Cheetos.and spit you out like a bad loogie.Buffalo.What a town, cowering in the shadow of omnipresent NYC.
You are right, I am not a fan of the city, I just went to university there. I am from the NYC area.

OSU has suspended its 7th player. Buffalo only has to loose by less than 28 to make this a moral victory!

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