Truck driver in fiery crash pleads no...

Truck driver in fiery crash pleads not guilty

There are 34 comments on the Bennington Banner story from Apr 18, 2008, titled Truck driver in fiery crash pleads not guilty. In it, Bennington Banner reports that:

The truck driver who allegedly caused a fiery, fatal crash by speeding and traveling with an unsecured load on Route 9 Wednesday pleaded not guilty to negligent driving Thursday in Bennington District Court.

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forrest davis

Nathalie, VA

#21 Apr 19, 2008
the BOOK get your paper out and stop each and every driver and test them on how to adjust their brakes, and see if any of them can do it!!!! this is one of the first and main things they were suppose to learn...my money says 1 out of 1000 drivers knows how to adjust their brakes!!!!!
Locals wrote:
I honestly agree with most of the opinions brought here to this message board. But what no one has brought up... What does this driver feel?? Does he care, or even understand that he has killed people? The gilt from knowing that he could have changed the whole outcome had he been more responsible, and taken the precautions that ARE IN THE BOOK, the stuff you have to know before you can get your CDL alone would be enough to put me under. However, being local and knowing some of those in the my family and I send our condolences to the family of those lost.
Ydnas

Harrisburg, PA

#22 Apr 21, 2008
Commercial drivers need more incentive to drive safely. Trucks come down Woodford mountain, on a regular basis with hot smelling brakes, brakes smoking, brakes on fire, and sometimes brakes completely faded by overheating. I have witnessed them all.

I used to drive that mountain with a fully loaded box on a truck which only had hydraulic brakes. It took twenty minutes to get up the mountain and twenty to get down, with the tranny in 3rd low. It was the same in Searsburg.

Both the driver and the company at the point of origin should be made to pay fines and restitution. The driver should lose his right to ever drive in VT again, with the penalty of jail time if he does; commercially or otherwise.

Drivers who don't down shift on downhill grades, especially when warned by signage, should have their licenses pulled. That is a primary concept that has been on the books since the beginning of commercial trucking.

The driver may be feeling really bad about the damage he has caused to other folks, but it is a little late for that. He may be wishing he had downshifted, but all the wishing isn't going to change his course of action. He had the opportunity to make the right call but chose otherwise. Maybe the company who hired him as a driver should likewise be srcutinized for hiring a driver with either not enough knowledge, a bad attitude about proper driving habits, or both.
Williamstown

Clockville, NY

#23 Apr 21, 2008
Ingnorance for the law is no excuse for arrogance. Ihope he rots in jail for what he did to my friends and thier families.
Williamstown

Clockville, NY

#24 Apr 21, 2008
can anyone comment with their ownfeelings. all i can see is quotes from someone else.Is anyone for real?????
In my word 2 you

Bennington, VT

#25 Apr 22, 2008
I'm not sure there is anyway to properly secure those kind of rolls.
forrest davis

Waynesboro, VA

#26 Apr 22, 2008
you,re probably right, a van trailer is not designed to secure an item as heavy as one of these rolls of paper .. that's why it is extreamly important to have experianced safe drivers...not rookies-not cowboys!!!!!!!
trkrjim

United States

#27 Apr 24, 2008
the reason the jake brakes are so load is because they have geared down. they only work when the engines rpm's are high. otherwise they don't have any braking power.
Mike Johnson wrote:
Also for those who haven't experienced constant truck traffic passing within 50' from there house; You should hear a jake brake on a tractor trailer going 60-70 down the mountain at 3 a.m. not letting up the whole way. Most don't "gear down",they do it the lazy way. I have lived near a train track before and that was far easier to accept than this noise,by far the worse on my list.
trkrjim

United States

#28 Apr 24, 2008
they often just put rubber mats on the floor to keep the rolls from sliding around, but if their is any blame it needs to be placed back on the shipper. it needs to be shared with the shipper.
In my word 2 you wrote:
I'm not sure there is anyway to properly secure those kind of rolls.
trkrjim

United States

#29 Apr 24, 2008
Heartland Express who this fool was working for is one of the most profitable trucking companies in the country and the equipment is fairly new, less than 3 years probably.Brakes were not an issue in this crash. bad driving, negligent driving sure were factors. By regulation drivers are not even allowed to adjust brakes anymore. you need a cerifacation. with the self adjusting brakes in use now their really isn't an issue. and as far as speeding on that road everyone needs to be slowed down. Personally it pisses me off to be passed by out of staters going well over the limit when driving that road at a reasonable speed which is still over the 50mph limit.
forrest davis wrote:
the BOOK get your paper out and stop each and every driver and test them on how to adjust their brakes, and see if any of them can do it!!!! this is one of the first and main things they were suppose to learn...my money says 1 out of 1000 drivers knows how to adjust their brakes!!!!! <quoted text>
joe marlboro ma

Marlborough, MA

#30 Apr 24, 2008
my deepest condolences to the families effected by this tragic accident.I am a tractor-trailer driver who uses route nine often, i am well aware of the dangers and drive accordingly, please know that we drivers care about the public and how we conduct ourselves while operating our equipment none of us ever wants to hurt or kill anyone.
Ex-trucker in VT

Bennington, VT

#31 Apr 24, 2008
I used to haul those types of loads from Gilman. There is no way to secure those rolls. The load bars that are available are totally inadequate for these types of cargos. One of these rolls can weigh the same as a small car or truck. The truck driver is in total negligence. The signs are there to warn you of the dangerous downgrade. Route 9 can be tricky to drive, but any driver that has been around this country know that there are more dangerous roads than this. His failure to down shift and drive at the safe prudent speed posted took 2 people from this world. One person is still in the hospital. Shippers also need to take some responsibilities to how these loads are put on and secured. Most of these loads are secured and the driver is not allowed to open to check. I can't count numerous loads that I had to pick up when I was told by the shipper do not break the seal or lock. Truckers do need more incentives to encourage safe driving. It starts with the companies themselves. A lot of times they don't care if you experienced a break down, traffic jams, bad weather or whatever it is, just get that load there now. Punish the driver, you should punish the company. I give my condolences to the families of the victims. You all are in my prayers.
In my word 2 you

Bennington, VT

#32 Apr 24, 2008
I believe you are right,the truck drive is on a tight schedule. If he is late the company does give him a hard time no matter what the reason. The are some companies that try to get the driver to drive more hours than he is allowed to.

Since: Apr 08

Bennington, VT

#33 Apr 30, 2008
In my word 2 you wrote:
I believe you are right,the truck drive is on a tight schedule. If he is late the company does give him a hard time no matter what the reason. The are some companies that try to get the driver to drive more hours than he is allowed to.
You have no idea. I still hear stories from drivers that are encouraged by their dispatchers to run extra log books. It's all about making the all mighty dollar. I do believe that the trucker has responsibility in his actions. He knew he was driving an unstable load and to fast for a road that he wasn't familiar with. I would rather have P.O. my dispatcher for late loads than to have an accident on my record because he thought it was a high priority load. I can't recall how many times my dispatcher told me that this load had to be there yesterday that's how important it is.

There's a neat little invention that a lot of these trucks have that do long haul, it's called Qualcomm. It's like a computer that companies use to relay info on loads and vehicle info. Even messages that are sent from/to driver and dispatch. Kind of like a black box.
Real Vermonter

Boston, MA

#34 Sep 17, 2008
It's the difference between right and wrong! Some people know it and others do not! This driver didn't know the difference and has to pay for it now! He's getting off easy unlike the others involved in this crash! God Speed!

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