First Prev
of 5
Next Last
Anon

Saint Marys, GA

#1 Jun 24, 2012
Has anybody been there yet? How is the food? Was the service good? Is it worth a stop? Thanks.
Ye Turd

Kingsland, GA

#2 Jun 24, 2012
Please tell us and validate what I have heard.
anon

Milledgeville, GA

#3 Jun 24, 2012
My family ate there yesterday for lunch. Food and service were good. Restaurant was very clean. It's worth stopping by.
Gator Ali

Saint Marys, GA

#4 Jun 24, 2012
Where is Hot Skillet? I'll give it a try.
Across KB from Barberitos

Kingsland, GA

#5 Jun 24, 2012
I ate breakfast there Thursday,at 9:30AM

Very clean.

Prompt service from attractive, pleasant, "girl next door" teens.

Good coffee.

Had "meat lovers" omelette, a three egg omellet with sauteed green and red peppers, onions, and choice of ham, bacon or sausage. I went with ham.
Quantity/quality/preparation of all ingredients excellent.

Good biscuits. Quality jelly.

Home fries were good but would have preferred hash browns - not the shredded ones but the cubed and browned-in-the-frying-pan-in-a -bit-of-bacon- grease kind.

Prices: moderate.

Recommendation: try it.

Can anyone give a report on the actual "skillet" breakfasts?
Oops forgot grits

Kingsland, GA

#6 Jun 24, 2012
The grits at Hot Skillet ae fine for Yankees wo don't know better.

Totally unsat for this Southerner.

Strike one: I NEVER eat instant grits.

Stike 2: Even had they been original grits, they were way to thin. If your cooking spoon wil not stand up by itself when plunged into the middle of a full pot of grits, they're too thin.

Either you started off with too much water/too little grits or you did not add the grits to water on a rolling boil or did not cook them long enough there after or some combination of all of the above.

Strike 3: Not served with a scoop of real butter the size of a golf ball.

Note to owners (who almost certainly started this thread. I just replenished my supply of origimal grits a few minutes ago. The only sotre I know of in all of Camden that still carries original (or real, as I call them) grits is Harveys in St. Marys.

Do not buy the cheaper five pound bag of Aunt Jemima's. It's that damn course ground yellow corn grits.

Until you can get Sysco to fix you up with real grits, buy the 2 lb bags of Jim Dandy original, fine ground, white grits.

In case you don't know, you're looking at less than 10 minutes more cooking time.
PS to owner

Kingsland, GA

#7 Jun 24, 2012
I always eat breakfast at Cracker Barrel when I travel. I don't eat their grits either for exactly the same reasons.

However, their hashbrowns with onions are excellent so long as you can convince your waitress that you are totally serious when you say you want them scattered and cooked until the edges just begin to burn. The rest will be crispy and delicious, especially with over easy eggs on top.
chall

Woodbine, GA

#8 Jun 24, 2012
My husband and I went there this afternoon. The mushroom skillet was very good. Having never had a "skillet" before, I was surprised that the eggs were served on top of the potatoes, but it was great.
My husband ordered the French toast/eggs.
The coffee was ok. I am a little bit of a coffee snob, and it was a little weak for my taste.
The atmosphere was clean and relaxing, and the wait staff was pleasant - maybe a little too attentive, but she was so sweet, we left a good tip.
I will definitely go back. Next time I think I will try another one of the skillets that has gravy and order the gravy on the side so I can put it on my biscuit.
Thanks for the info

Kingsland, GA

#9 Jun 24, 2012
chall wrote:
My husband and I went there this afternoon. The mushroom skillet was very good. Having never had a "skillet" before, I was surprised that the eggs were served on top of the potatoes, but it was great.
My husband ordered the French toast/eggs.
The coffee was ok. I am a little bit of a coffee snob, and it was a little weak for my taste.
The atmosphere was clean and relaxing, and the wait staff was pleasant - maybe a little too attentive, but she was so sweet, we left a good tip.
I will definitely go back. Next time I think I will try another one of the skillets that has gravy and order the gravy on the side so I can put it on my biscuit.
I'll try a skillet next time.

Yes, my sweet young waitress was a little too attentive as well but a nice change of pace!:-)
Redneck

Woodbine, GA

#10 Jun 24, 2012
Tried them this AM. Ordered 2 eggs over medium, home fries, link sausage, white toast, and coffee. The eggs, toast, and sausage were ok. The home fries were over done. Smaller pieces were crispy.

My main gripe is the price.$6.99 for food and $1.99 for the coffee. I think most restaurants do not charge extra for coffee with breakfast.
Although my home fries

Kingsland, GA

#11 Jun 24, 2012
were not that crispy, I remember noting the wide range of sizes of the chunks of potatoes and wondering if they were frozen or if they had chopped up fresh potatoes. Either way, more uniform sizes would help the problem you describe.

Alternatively, they could trying making authentic hash browns the Howard Johnson's way.

1. Bake the whole potatoes just short of sufficiently soft to serve as baked potatoes.

2. Cut both ends out of a soup can, like a Campbell's condensed soup can.

3. Place the baked potatoes upon a cutting board.
With a sharp knife, cut the potatoes in half, length wise. Arrange the halves on the board flat side down.

Holding one end of the open can in the palm of your hand,use the can rather like a cookie cuter to cut the potatoes into chunks about the size of the distal phalanx of your thumb.

Why not a knife? Good question. The can tends to crush its way rather than slice its way through the potatoes. The finished product will have rough edges that are sort of covered in something akin to mashed potatoes. That makes them brown up more easily.

Fry them up in a well seasoned cast iron skillet with a bit of bacon grease -just enough to lightly coat the potatoes as you stir them around gently with a wooden spoon.

When the potatoes first start to brown, take them out of the pan and store in refer at 40 degrees F until you need them. You can do this the day before.

Come breakfast, break out a working supply from the refer. You can finish browning them in a pan on a per-order basis. If the customer wants onions,
have some lightly sauteed onions prepared that morning to add to the potatoes during their final warming/ browning.

Not quite as easy as throwing home fries into the deep fat fryer, but customers will love them - especially nostalgic older Southerners.
Why bake the potatoes

Kingsland, GA

#12 Jun 24, 2012
Because its a damned site quicker to brow them when they have been almost completely cooked in thee oven.

That also makes the can cutting method doable.

Who is going to try this at home and get back to us?
AUC Atlanta

Herndon, PA

#13 Jun 24, 2012
Is this a "how to cook" thread?
Location

Kingsland, GA

#14 Jun 24, 2012
Where is the place located?
Queasy

Woodbine, GA

#16 Jun 24, 2012
Moreno likes the place so that means that I won't be trying it. There's no way I could stomach anything with him on the premises. Way to damage another business, Jay.
Why yes it is

Kingsland, GA

#17 Jun 25, 2012
AUC Atlanta wrote:
Is this a "how to cook" thread?
and at no extra charge for advice from an expert. What a deal!

When the mood hits me, I'll tell you how to make killer French toast.
Anon

Saint Marys, GA

#18 Jun 25, 2012
Although my home fries wrote:
were not that crispy, I remember noting the wide range of sizes of the chunks of potatoes and wondering if they were frozen or if they had chopped up fresh potatoes. Either way, more uniform sizes would help the problem you describe.
Alternatively, they could trying making authentic hash browns the Howard Johnson's way.
1. Bake the whole potatoes just short of sufficiently soft to serve as baked potatoes.
2. Cut both ends out of a soup can, like a Campbell's condensed soup can.
3. Place the baked potatoes upon a cutting board.
With a sharp knife, cut the potatoes in half, length wise. Arrange the halves on the board flat side down.
Holding one end of the open can in the palm of your hand,use the can rather like a cookie cuter to cut the potatoes into chunks about the size of the distal phalanx of your thumb.
Why not a knife? Good question. The can tends to crush its way rather than slice its way through the potatoes. The finished product will have rough edges that are sort of covered in something akin to mashed potatoes. That makes them brown up more easily.
Fry them up in a well seasoned cast iron skillet with a bit of bacon grease -just enough to lightly coat the potatoes as you stir them around gently with a wooden spoon.
When the potatoes first start to brown, take them out of the pan and store in refer at 40 degrees F until you need them. You can do this the day before.
Come breakfast, break out a working supply from the refer. You can finish browning them in a pan on a per-order basis. If the customer wants onions,
have some lightly sauteed onions prepared that morning to add to the potatoes during their final warming/ browning.
Not quite as easy as throwing home fries into the deep fat fryer, but customers will love them - especially nostalgic older Southerners.
I usually try to avoid answering Moreno's cooking hints but I have to take exception. If I ever tried using his method in a real restaurant, I would never get any potatoes out.

To make hash browns, first PEEL the potatoes (you can leave them unpeeled if that is what your menu features, but most people prefer peeled). Now BOIL the potatoes until they are just barely tender. Drain and cool. The potatoes can be cut now or refrigerated until needed, uncut. Cut into 2 or 4 sections, lengthwise, depending on the size of the spud. They can be sliced into about 1/4 inch sliced quickly by knife if the cook is experienced. I prefer precutting with a slicer which has a series of blades at the proper spacing so the whole segment can be cut at once. When the order comes up, throw a serving onto the breakfast grill. Salt lightly and pepper liberally while browning. The best flavor comes from bacon grease left on the grill. Throw a handful of chopped onions onto the grill to cook while the potatoes are browning and mix into the hash browns just before they finish browning. The different parts of the order should finish and hit the plate together. The whole smooth timing of the process is what marks a good breakfast grill cook.
Moreno Jay

Saint Marys, GA

#19 Jun 25, 2012
Anon wrote:
<quoted text>
I usually try to avoid answering Moreno's cooking hints but I have to take exception. If I ever tried using his method in a real restaurant, I would never get any potatoes out.
To make hash browns, first PEEL the potatoes (you can leave them unpeeled if that is what your menu features, but most people prefer peeled). Now BOIL the potatoes until they are just barely tender. Drain and cool. The potatoes can be cut now or refrigerated until needed, uncut. Cut into 2 or 4 sections, lengthwise, depending on the size of the spud. They can be sliced into about 1/4 inch sliced quickly by knife if the cook is experienced. I prefer precutting with a slicer which has a series of blades at the proper spacing so the whole segment can be cut at once. When the order comes up, throw a serving onto the breakfast grill. Salt lightly and pepper liberally while browning. The best flavor comes from bacon grease left on the grill. Throw a handful of chopped onions onto the grill to cook while the potatoes are browning and mix into the hash browns just before they finish browning. The different parts of the order should finish and hit the plate together. The whole smooth timing of the process is what marks a good breakfast grill cook.
I am a graduate of the Burger King College of Culinary Arts and was promoted to Assistant Manager of the St. Simons store because of my superior skills in the kitchen.

You have proven nothing to me. Perhaps you have obtained some limited experience at a Huddle House, nothing more. Regardless, don't even try to challenge my professional expertise at the flat top you filthy vermin.

Oops, it's time to head over to Aunt B's for the Monday lunch special. I think I will have some fried chicken with my meat loaf and cube steak and gravy today. See you later Sarah.
Dear one-way dunce

Kingsland, GA

#20 Jun 25, 2012
Anon wrote:
<quoted text>
I usually try to avoid answering Moreno's cooking hints but I have to take exception. If I ever tried using his method in a real restaurant, I would never get any potatoes out.
To make hash browns, first PEEL the potatoes (you can leave them unpeeled if that is what your menu features, but most people prefer peeled). Now BOIL the potatoes until they are just barely tender. Drain and cool. The potatoes can be cut now or refrigerated until needed, uncut. Cut into 2 or 4 sections, lengthwise, depending on the size of the spud. They can be sliced into about 1/4 inch sliced quickly by knife if the cook is experienced. I prefer precutting with a slicer which has a series of blades at the proper spacing so the whole segment can be cut at once. When the order comes up, throw a serving onto the breakfast grill. Salt lightly and pepper liberally while browning. The best flavor comes from bacon grease left on the grill. Throw a handful of chopped onions onto the grill to cook while the potatoes are browning and mix into the hash browns just before they finish browning. The different parts of the order should finish and hit the plate together. The whole smooth timing of the process is what marks a good breakfast grill cook.
The folks at Howard Johnson's have the night cook prepare the potatoes in the early morning hours to keep him busy. The beauty of the system is that you can also use any left over baked potatoes that were prepared for diiner that evening but were not prepared.

The texture of the ones cut with the can is much more amenable to browning and brown much more quickly.

Yes, you can do them on the flat top as well as in a skillet, depending on your breakfast volume.

I frankly don't give a damn how you cook yours. I've you want to stick a spud up your ass and sit in a sauna 'til done, then dive into a wood chipper that's OK with me, you friggin snarky arsehole.
One small correction

Kingsland, GA

#21 Jun 25, 2012
The beauty of the system is that you can also use any left over baked potatoes that were prepared for dinner that evening but were not served.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 5
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

St. Marys Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Another rethuglican politician arrested. Nothin... 3 hr Righty 2
Saul Alinsky: Comrade Bob Nutter's guru and men... 4 hr Chuckles 78
Wyoming gets it right on marriage equality 4 hr Camden Family Voter 1
Ebola facts - for the intellectually challenged 5 hr Anon 1
Good job Mr. President, 5.9% unemployment noted! 7 hr abm22 24
Who will Moreno blame for losing the election? 10 hr Nancy 9
Stunning federal corruption case moving forward... 13 hr LonePalm 2
St. Marys Dating
Find my Match

St. Marys Jobs

St. Marys People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

St. Marys News, Events & Info

Click for news, events and info in St. Marys

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]