Ownership of Adena tablet in dispute ...

Ownership of Adena tablet in dispute | The Columbus Dispatch

There are 49 comments on the Columbus Dispatch story from Dec 7, 2009, titled Ownership of Adena tablet in dispute | The Columbus Dispatch. In it, Columbus Dispatch reports that:

Edward Low displays a replica of the tablet he found as a child near his Parkersburg, W.Va., home.

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Gunny Sarge

Collierville, TN

#1 Dec 7, 2009
Having both donated and loaned artifacts to museums, if the Historical Society is correct, they will have paperwork to sunstantiate their claim that this was indeed a donation. If they cannot produce this paperwork, they need to return this item. It's up to them to prove it, as a State institution, they should have these files.
Lucinda

Grove City, OH

#2 Dec 7, 2009
Edward Low trespassed upon property not his own, unlawfully dug up an ancient artifact, stole it, illegally concealed it for many years, finally came to his senses and delivered it to authorities, and now expects that it be returned to him? I don't think that's how it works. He's lucky not to be charged with the crimes he committed; the statute of limitations for trespassing, criminal damaging, conspiracy and theft have long passed.

He accepted a lifetime membership to the the OHS in exchange for donating an object he stole in the first place, and he has a nice replica of the artifact. He ought to call it a day and knock off the whining.
Observer

Columbus, OH

#3 Dec 7, 2009
Give the guy his tablet back. I sure wouldn't "loan" anything to this museum seeing how they operate.
ben_bovas

Downey, CA

#4 Dec 7, 2009
Lucinda and others of like mind,- Young Edward Low followed his youthful inclination to explore and play, something sadly lacking in most of today's youth. In doing so he found something really cool, which he at least recognized enough to collect and preserve. Wrapped in newspaper and kept in a sock drawer is not any worse than many or most artifacts at OHS or any other museum. It doesn't seem like he concealed it since he shared his find with classmates. As an adult he shared his find with authorities, in ANOTHER STATE! Through a misunderstanding, probably aided by the informality of the meeting between him and the OHS archaeologist, the state has now declared that they have seized his boyhood treasure.

Until Ohio, and this country recognize that its laws regarding found treasures are counterproductive, discouraging to explorers and finders and ambiguous to legal experts, and until we the people draft sensible laws regarding treasure trove, similar to those in the UK, we continually will see knowledge of the existence of such treasures forced underground, or else we will see misunderstandings like this case. Where is the incentive for a finder to come forward? In the UK a finder comes forward and presents his finds. The "state" decides which of the finds should become part of the national patrimony, and the finder and landowner are compensated based on the fare market value of whatever the state takes: a system that is sensible, straightforward, and fair.
crupan

United States

#5 Dec 7, 2009
Boo... Ohio Historical Society. Let him give it to the other museum.
lwd

Columbus, OH

#6 Dec 7, 2009
Musuems all over the Western world are presently being confronted about relics and artifacts that they have considered "theirs" for many years. As their methods of acquisition are being called into question, many countries and individuals seek to reclaim items that have been plundered. War, occupation, economic exploitation, and just plain expropriation are no excuse for annexing cultural treasures. If there is no verifiable paperwork, this person should be allowed to reclaim this piece, even though he allowed it to remain in the museum's possession for many years, especially since he intends to deliver it to another museum closer to the actual find. I suspect, given his age, that the museum is stonewalling until he dies, when the original issue would be so muddied that defacto, it will be allowed to retain this piece. Shameful!
confiscation

Lancaster, OH

#7 Dec 7, 2009
OHS, shame on you. Return this confiscated artifact to its rightful owner. Unofficial and unsigned letters substantiate nothing.

Your actions merely discourage other finders from sharing their insightful treasures with the public.
Gary

Columbus, OH

#8 Dec 7, 2009
Lucinda wrote:
Edward Low trespassed upon property not his own, unlawfully dug up an ancient artifact, stole it, illegally concealed it for many years, finally came to his senses and delivered it to authorities, and now expects that it be returned to him? I don't think that's how it works. He's lucky not to be charged with the crimes he committed; the statute of limitations for trespassing, criminal damaging, conspiracy and theft have long passed.
He accepted a lifetime membership to the the OHS in exchange for donating an object he stole in the first place, and he has a nice replica of the artifact. He ought to call it a day and knock off the whining.
You must be related to one of the thieves at the Ohio Hijacking Society
Amy Columbus OH

Columbus, OH

#9 Dec 7, 2009
OHS - please return this item to Mr. Low and drop your costly lawsuit. From what I read, Mr. Low signed nothing giving the item to you in perpetuity. The Society should be grateful they've had it as long as they have. The consideration of the lifetime membership I believe should have been given just for the long-term loan of the artifact and in no way constitutes payment for this item. Do the right thing - give this gentlemen back his tablet!
Give it back

New Philadelphia, OH

#10 Dec 7, 2009
The position of the Historical Society could best be described as, "Mine, mine, mine!"

Also, they say, "The Society has protected and preserved this valuable artifact since 1971."

Ummm...dude? It's a rock. Just how much "protecting and preserving" needed to be done?!

Give it back to the guy who found it. Buncha greedy jerks. Geez!
Think Harder

Columbus, OH

#11 Dec 7, 2009
With theiving policies like the OHS, I wouldn't loan out artifacts to any museum without signed paperwork written by a team of lawyers.
Bob

Buford, GA

#12 Dec 7, 2009
OHS should give it back. They act like politicians that feel everything belongs them.
Observer

Columbus, OH

#13 Dec 7, 2009
There is a much easier and faster way to get it back, you know....
DublinJerry

Columbus, OH

#14 Dec 7, 2009
Produce some convincing proof that this was a donation, or return the stone to the finder.
Rick

United States

#15 Dec 7, 2009
Indian giver.....
Nuff Said

Philo, OH

#16 Dec 7, 2009
OHS is WRONG! No one will be willing to donate or lend under such misleading rules. Someone should report them to the BBB. They would not receive a rating. RIPOFF ARTISTS! DON'T DONATE OR LOAN ANYTHING!
Dave

Fairborn, OH

#17 Dec 7, 2009
The document is called a "Deed of Gift" and OHS needs to produce one with Mr. Low's signature.
John

Columbus, OH

#18 Dec 7, 2009
He will probably never get it back since they have been in possession so long. They should do the right thing and give it back but they won't. Another thing that many people don't understand is that these museums often sell what people donate to them to raise funds so if you think they will always preserve great-grandpa's Civil War musket, think again. Also consider the many known instances of museum employees stealing artifacts in storage and selling them on ebay or the open market. I would NEVER donate anything to a museum, EVER!!!!!
grovecitygrump

Columbus, OH

#19 Dec 7, 2009
The Society's lawyers must belong to the Dewey, Cheathem, and Howe school of jurisprudence.

The "two" Echoes articles they claim refer to Mr. Low's "donation" do no such thing and are actually one article published in November 1975 and reprinted verbatim in February 1980. According to it, Mr. Low "brought" the tablet to the Society "to satisfy his curiosity." He was "surprised at the staff's enthusiasm about the piece." Not a word suggests that he donated it at any time.

The tablet was on display for a period but then put in storage and only put back up on display when Mr. Low tried to get it back to donate to a West Virginia museum, where it can be protected and viewed bay all.
Chief Red Bone

Mystic, CT

#20 Dec 7, 2009
Give the tablet back OHS, what you are doing is stealing, and worse, lost the trust of the public. There are thousands of First Nation artifacts sitting in vaults or obscure museums collecting dust, time to display the history of the country in a proper museum dedicated to the pre-colonial era.

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