Missing St. Ann woman died of heroin ...

Missing St. Ann woman died of heroin overdose

There are 36 comments on the KSDK-TV Saint Louis story from Apr 11, 2011, titled Missing St. Ann woman died of heroin overdose. In it, KSDK-TV Saint Louis reports that:

A St. Ann woman, who disappeared for three weeks, and then was found dead, died from a heroin overdose.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at KSDK-TV Saint Louis.

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A little looney

Kimmswick, MO

#2 Apr 12, 2011
How sad is that! Beautiful young woman dies from Heroin overdose...How tragic.....I hope that all young people who view Topics can learn a lesson from this poor womans bad decision....Don't go to bars alone and don't leave with anyone you don't know period,and especially to motels that have drug parties! My niece died at age l5 from drinking and drugging at a party. She was taking Oxycodone,alcohol and something else I can't think of it right now,but what a horrible horrible happening.
TTU

United States

#3 Apr 12, 2011
Reverend Vegas wrote:
They're dropping like flies around here. The DEA needs to focus it's energy on Mexico keeping this garbage from crossing our borders. Instead of going after our own citizens, they should be intercepting this crap and taking on these Mexican drug cartels. Mexico is the REAL threat to our country...Why are we in Afghanistan protecting poppy fields when we should be in Mexico removing these cartels, protecting the Mexican and American people from these brutal killers that reside right on our doorstep.
Hey Rev--I thought you were on the for legalization bandwagon?
Kazard

Florissant, MO

#4 Apr 12, 2011
TTU wrote:
<quoted text>
Hey Rev--I thought you were on the for legalization bandwagon?
Who cares the guys an idiot.
Get Over It

Saint Louis, MO

#5 Apr 12, 2011
Decriminalize all of it.
Let the government GIVE the drugs to the users or supply it at a very cheap cost. If you decriminalize and regulate drugs the biggest dangers in drug use will be to the users. We won't have to worry about them committing crimes to support their habits.
No more meth labs in neighborhoods if the government distributes meth at a dirt cheap price.
Decriminalizing heroine would remove the Taliban's source of income. Another problem solved.
Once it's out in the open we can talk about it openly without fear of legal repercussions and start to find ways to get people off drugs or manage their dependencies.
Drugs are not much different than any other weakness or bad habit. We allow people to drink, smoke or engage in risky sexual behaviors.
But we find drug use to cross some imaginary line in the moral sand.
broomhilda

Saint Louis, MO

#6 Apr 12, 2011
A little looney wrote:
How sad is that! Beautiful young woman dies from Heroin overdose...How tragic..... can't think of it right now,but what a horrible horrible happening.
So if she were ugly that would make it ok?
A little looney

United States

#8 Apr 13, 2011
Broomhilda..... that "statement"needs to be swept under the carpet.... A person should never joke about the seriousness of playing around with Heroin.
TTU

United States

#9 Apr 13, 2011
Reverend Vegas wrote:
<quoted text>
Sure, that would stop the shipments coming in really quickly if there was no money in it. That's certainly one way to do it.
Problem with legalization is that if you make the drugs plentiful but controlled, you will have to set a lower age limit, and you will create a black market to supply younger kids below that limit. People will sell the stuff meant for older teens and adults to younger kids to make money, and the drugs will be dosed for larger older people, so you'll end up with more ODs among younger kids--I mean even 8 and 9 year olds.

This has been tried in Europe and its a bloody disaster--grade schoolers trippin out in school, dude!

no sale

Saint Louis, MO

#10 Apr 13, 2011
TTU wrote:
<quoted text>
Problem with legalization is that if you make the drugs plentiful but controlled, you will have to set a lower age limit, and you will create a black market to supply younger kids below that limit. People will sell the stuff meant for older teens and adults to younger kids to make money, and the drugs will be dosed for larger older people, so you'll end up with more ODs among younger kids--I mean even 8 and 9 year olds.
This has been tried in Europe and its a bloody disaster--grade schoolers trippin out in school, dude!
Where in Europe? I don't buy that story or the line of reasoning.
My kid doesn't smoke tobacco or drink She isn't going to start taking heroin because it is also available to adults.
We are not talking about making it available at the local liquor store right next to the cigarettes. Control would be more on the order of pharmaceuticals.
Sure there will be abuses, kids take guns to school, kids drink and smoke and do all kinds of things they shouldn't. That isn't the majority or the norm.
If parents don't do their job, there is only so much society can do.
If some kids want to get drugs they will get them illegally.
Why not take the massive profits and crime out of the drug trade by making the drugs available with some control?
Drug use is self-abuse. Like other forms of self-abuse, it is difficult to stop.
But you can remove or reduce the incentives to commit crimes against others or their property by decriminalizing drugs. Stealing a car stereo or robbing a 7-11 to support one's drug habit is not needed if the drugs are legally available and priced reasonably.
Plus it is easier to help those addicted individuals when you remove the criminal stigma and allow them to be viewed by society as someone with a problem instead of a contemptible criminal who needs to be thrown in prison.
Decriminalization of drugs would also help in the control of the spread of diseases often associated with drug users.
How many meth labs do you think authorities would find in homes if clean, controlled and inexpensive drugs were available?
How many fewer crimes would there be if drug addicts did not have to resort of criminal activities to support their habits?
The loudest rebuttals I have heard against drug decriminalization have been based in religiously inspired moralistic concepts.
TTU

United States

#11 Apr 13, 2011
no sale ... you are totally oblivious.

From a 2008 NY Times article "Heroin's Hold on The Young" ... "The surge in teenage use of heroin, officials say, has much to do with its increased purity. Because of the drug’s high quality, users can snort heroin rather than inject it intravenously; as a result, young people are more apt to try it."

From "Addiction World" ... Feb 19, 2011 ... 2 fatal heroin overdoses raise alarm | jconline.com | Journal and .... Main St.(1) ;CHILDREN as young as eight years are starting to use drugs ..... more shows in Europe and her “people” are saying it is due to an upper ..."

I know that a lot of folks like a little help relaxin' but this stuff is extremely dangerous, and once you are hooked--you are hooked forever. Legalize? NEVER.
TTU

United States

#13 Apr 13, 2011
Reverend Vegas wrote:
<quoted text>
BS...kids don't have money. I hate that argument..."It's for the kids"....my ass...
Do you actually think drug dealers infiltrate play grounds?
NO...they go where the money is...
AND WHY...would you HAVE to set a lower age limit?
Kids will definitely get into things such as they do with alcohol...but they can't go into a store and buy it. So we have a way to control the distribution. Should we lower the age for alcohol consumption before the kiddies start bootlegging bathtub vodka? You seem to be grabbing facts out of thin air. Young children aren't tripping in school any more than they are here. I doubt you have any factual information to back that statement up anyway. The only way to stop the problem is to drop the market out from underneath it. Drug cartels in Mexico are racking up a bigger body count than the middle east war every day. The current policy DOES NOT work. How can you even deny that? There's more drugs on the street now than there were when the war on drugs started...and the budget is 10000 times bigger than it was then. How can people turn a blind eye to such compelling facts...It's unbelievable..
Still not a believer Rev? Young kids are tripping--including in school. They put LSD on the adhesive of postage stamps, then lick them and dab the wet paste in the corner of their eyes. Ask teachers and school nurses. Look on the internet.

Mary Case, StLouis County coroner recently said we have an OD "epidemic" here--where is the outrage? 30 deaths in one year. You have to factor in lost productivity, as well as costs of care for OD victims and incapacitated users, increased car wrecks, etc. Use of powerful haluc. drugs is not a harmless past time.

A hundred years ago, China was the big opiate dealer and we had opium dens around the world. No, if the war on drugs is not working, then change strategies and tactics, but don't let up.
TTU

United States

#15 Apr 14, 2011
Reverend Vegas wrote:
<quoted text>
Although the internet is a wonderful source for information. You can't believe everything you see. I remember when I was a kid they told us to not accept stickers from strangers because they could have LSD on them. This is nothing new. Acid is usually transported on a piece of paper...or a "blotter". They also use gel tabs or straight liquid LSD from a breath drops bottle. Your terminology and knowledge of the subject really speak volumes about what you know and where you got your information.
We need to stop throwing all these non violent drug offenders in prison and instead help them so they can be productive citizens. This is an assault against our own citizens when it should be an assault on violent Mexican drug cartels which have military firepower. Instead the people of this country sit there with their thumbs in their asses. The "drug war" is an utter failure of epic proportions. We need to drop the lies...the BS bureaucracy...the money grabbers and decriminalize drug use and find a way to control it. The current policy is not working and you'd have to be blind, stupid or just willfully ignorant to believe it is.
I admit I have no "first hand" knowledge of the drug craft. But I have confidence in the internet sources I have read.

Obviously we disagree.

I will agree that we need an alternative to traditional incarceration for users. How about this: Users who only hurt themselves should be treated as having a disease. Users who hurt others, steal, would be punished for the criminal acts and treated for the "disease". Pushers and dealers get the full hand of the law, including the possibility of long term incarceration.
TTU

United States

#16 Apr 14, 2011
Oh, wait, our country is broke. We better check to see if our Chinese masters will loan us the money to implement our plans before we discuss this further. Does anybody know the number of the Chinese embassy?
making a difference

United States

#17 Apr 14, 2011
I think legalizing, is the essential way around drug dealers. At least some drugs, although opening one window will only lead to others wanting all the other drugs legal. I'm actually surprised our government HASN't done it yet. Pssh ,think of the taxing they'd do to it if it WERE legal to sell. But making it legal would probably take most of the violence etc out of it.

to "no sale", You can't always blame the parents. Some kids are just good at acting, i regret most of what i did 9-11th grade. But I had it made, and nobody, i mean NOBODY had a clue about me except my friends. I've had excellent grades my whole life, I was a violen nerd from 3rd to 8th grade.. always about my family, they didnt know i started smoking ciggarettes in 6th grade(PPL DO buy for young kids, no matter how young. i do not smoke now and havent for 7 years.), starting drinking in 7th grade, and 8-10 I got in with some bad influences of friends. I would use my allowance(and then my check once i was 15 and had a job.) to buy oxycotton, my favorite zanix and whatever else. I was a complete idiot. and so were my friends. It took a while but thankfully I pulled myself out of that group the minute it hit me how stupid i was acting, and how damaging i was being towards me body. My point however is, i was a great student, denied every even knowing anybody who did those things, i was a book nerd,violen nerd,top grades and some nerdy smart friends. My parents, and whole family..hadn't a clue, neither did my friends families.(also our drug POS friends were enver introduced to my friends.) OH, and I did get pregnant my senior year, to my beautiful,smart,amazing daughter. They had no idea I was doing THOSE things either.you can never be too careful.
kids are good liars someitmes, and i even had friends moms who would lie to my own. so be careful
no sale

Saint Louis, MO

#18 Apr 14, 2011
TTU wrote:
no sale ... you are totally oblivious.
From a 2008 NY Times article "Heroin's Hold on The Young" ... "The surge in teenage use of heroin, officials say, has much to do with its increased purity. Because of the drug’s high quality, users can snort heroin rather than inject it intravenously; as a result, young people are more apt to try it."
From "Addiction World" ... Feb 19, 2011 ... 2 fatal heroin overdoses raise alarm | jconline.com | Journal and .... Main St.(1) ;CHILDREN as young as eight years are starting to use drugs ..... more shows in Europe and her “people” are saying it is due to an upper ..."
I know that a lot of folks like a little help relaxin' but this stuff is extremely dangerous, and once you are hooked--you are hooked forever. Legalize? NEVER.
Oblivious?
I don't think so.
You said, "This has been tried in Europe and its a bloody disaster--grade schoolers trippin out in school, dude! "

I see no evidence to support your contention in the New York Times article.

The New York Times article points at an increase in heroin use in the U.S. But the percentage of actual users in the under 18 age range, although sad and alarming, is in no way a large percentage of the members of that age range. There are estimates that the total number of heroin users in the U.S. is around 1/4 million. That is less than one tenth of one percent and the 18 year olds are only a very small percentage of that number.

An illegal supply of heroin makes it easier to get. Yes, easier. If a substance is "controlled", the usage can be followed and monitored more easily. Also with more drugs decriminalized, the odds of a person turning to harder drugs is lower since there are other options.

Drug dependency is caused by a variety of factors. There are genetic, emotional and socio-economic factors related to drug addiction. Getting rid of drugs is almost impossible. It is easier to decriminalize them and then place better control on them.

Many drugs are addictive and their addictiveness varies. Nicotine is extremely difficult to kick but it is quite legal and it's affects on the body are in many ways worse than heroin. Yet, it is quite legal. Despite the best efforts of the tobacco companies advertising campaigns and very lax regulations, only about one in 5 persons is addicted to tobacco and the number is dropping.

I doubt a lot of people are going to run out to try heroin is it is decriminalized. I suspect, the number will be about the same as the number who would try it illegally.

You argument is mostly emotional.

If heroin is decriminalized, you will not try it. Nor will I.

Decriminalized heroin will not have ads like "Try Acme Heroin, its what separates the men from the boys!" Or "Heroin, it's what the sexy people snort."

Usage may even decline if the drug is better controlled and better understood.
TTU

United States

#19 Apr 14, 2011
no sale wrote:
<quoted text>
Oblivious?
I don't think so.
You said, "This has been tried in Europe and its a bloody disaster--grade schoolers trippin out in school, dude! "
I see no evidence to support your contention in the New York Times article.
The New York Times article points at an increase in heroin use in the U.S. But the percentage of actual users in the under 18 age range, although sad and alarming, is in no way a large percentage of the members of that age range. There are estimates that the total number of heroin users in the U.S. is around 1/4 million. That is less than one tenth of one percent and the 18 year olds are only a very small percentage of that number.
An illegal supply of heroin makes it easier to get. Yes, easier. If a substance is "controlled", the usage can be followed and monitored more easily. Also with more drugs decriminalized, the odds of a person turning to harder drugs is lower since there are other options.
Drug dependency is caused by a variety of factors. There are genetic, emotional and socio-economic factors related to drug addiction. Getting rid of drugs is almost impossible. It is easier to decriminalize them and then place better control on them.
Many drugs are addictive and their addictiveness varies. Nicotine is extremely difficult to kick but it is quite legal and it's affects on the body are in many ways worse than heroin. Yet, it is quite legal. Despite the best efforts of the tobacco companies advertising campaigns and very lax regulations, only about one in 5 persons is addicted to tobacco and the number is dropping.
I doubt a lot of people are going to run out to try heroin is it is decriminalized. I suspect, the number will be about the same as the number who would try it illegally.
You argument is mostly emotional.
If heroin is decriminalized, you will not try it. Nor will I.
Decriminalized heroin will not have ads like "Try Acme Heroin, its what separates the men from the boys!" Or "Heroin, it's what the sexy people snort."
Usage may even decline if the drug is better controlled and better understood.
Its okay to "try" drugs? You want teenagers to try drugs? News Flash: Cheech and Chong was an act, not a lifestyle choice. FYI Addiction to the various illegal drugs is difficult if not impossible to reverse, that's why its such a problem. It ruins lives. We don't know how many people have been persuaded from drugs by the war on drugs or the risks of getting caught, or because they did not want to end up like the burn outs.
My advice to you: find hole in sand: insert head.
no sale

Saint Louis, MO

#20 Apr 15, 2011
TTU wrote:
<quoted text>Its okay to "try" drugs? You want teenagers to try drugs? News Flash: Cheech and Chong was an act, not a lifestyle choice. FYI Addiction to the various illegal drugs is difficult if not impossible to reverse, that's why its such a problem. It ruins lives. We don't know how many people have been persuaded from drugs by the war on drugs or the risks of getting caught, or because they did not want to end up like the burn outs.
My advice to you: find hole in sand: insert head.
I am not in favor of anyone experimenting with drugs.
You have missed the point completely.(Somehow that does not surprise me.)

That fact is, drugs will be used by people. Whether you or I choose to use them is not relevant to the larger discussion.

If drugs are illegal, people will use them "illegally". If they are decriminalized, then society will deal with drug use in a different manner. Instead of sending drug users to jail and adding another layer of problems to their lives, they can get "help" without fear of bringing greater levels of difficulties to their situation. No one goes to jail for their nicotine addiction. They just buy a pack of cigarettes at the local store.

One of the reasons drugs "ruins lives" is because illegal drugs force people into doing things they would likely not consider or need to do to support their habit such as theft or prostitution or "drug dealing".
Another reason illegal drugs ruin lives is because the illegality can land the user in jail which is never a positive career move.

My advice to you is to think outside that box in which you you have locked your thinking. It is backward thinking such as yours that makes the world more difficult for everyone else.
TTU

United States

#21 Apr 15, 2011
no sale wrote:
<quoted text>
I am not in favor of anyone experimenting with drugs.
You have missed the point completely.(Somehow that does not surprise me.)
That fact is, drugs will be used by people. Whether you or I choose to use them is not relevant to the larger discussion.
If drugs are illegal, people will use them "illegally". If they are decriminalized, then society will deal with drug use in a different manner. Instead of sending drug users to jail and adding another layer of problems to their lives, they can get "help" without fear of bringing greater levels of difficulties to their situation. No one goes to jail for their nicotine addiction. They just buy a pack of cigarettes at the local store.
One of the reasons drugs "ruins lives" is because illegal drugs force people into doing things they would likely not consider or need to do to support their habit such as theft or prostitution or "drug dealing".
Another reason illegal drugs ruin lives is because the illegality can land the user in jail which is never a positive career move.
My advice to you is to think outside that box in which you you have locked your thinking. It is backward thinking such as yours that makes the world more difficult for everyone else.
I understand your position. However, I think that it is wrong. The drugs ruin lives because they ruin the user's brain and body, not just because users get caught stealing or prostituting. Drugs really do "fry" people's brains. I know a few people who have been regular users of marijuana for 20 plus years. I knew them in grade school and high school. They are literally dopes now. Maybe I'm wrong, but I don't see that condition improving.

Oh, and don't think that by legalizing you will cause the organized crime rings and gangs to join choirs or go legit or out of business. They will just go more into human trafficking, prostitution, etc.

NO WAY NO SALE
no sale

Saint Louis, MO

#22 Apr 15, 2011
TTU wrote:
<quoted text>I understand your position. However, I think that it is wrong. The drugs ruin lives because they ruin the user's brain and body, not just because users get caught stealing or prostituting. Drugs really do "fry" people's brains. I know a few people who have been regular users of marijuana for 20 plus years. I knew them in grade school and high school. They are literally dopes now. Maybe I'm wrong, but I don't see that condition improving.
Oh, and don't think that by legalizing you will cause the organized crime rings and gangs to join choirs or go legit or out of business. They will just go more into human trafficking, prostitution, etc.
NO WAY NO SALE
Of course drugs can cause human physiological problems.
I do not deny that fact. Alcohol and nicotine also cause damage to the body. But users of nicotine and alcohol can seek help without fear. No so for drug users.

If you keep drugs illegal the physiological damage can be far worse since the users must stay "underground" and the delivery or ingestion methods are usually more risky.(i.e. dirty needles and inconsistent quality of the drugs.)

Heavy use of any chemical can "fry" a brain. Too much exposure to industrial solvents can have the same effect. But we control those substances and educate people to the dangers. Once people go underground the education becomes less effective and is often incorrect and misleading or worse nonexistent.

People will use drugs. There is no way to stop them. Making them illegal just pushes the problem into a different way of dealing with it. Rather than try to force with threats, why not use something more positive that doesn't punish them for their weaknesses but rewards them when they are able to move themselves into a more positive and productive direction?

I've known people who were users of all sorts of drugs, heroin, cocaine, marijuana, nicotine, alcohol, amphetamines and on and on. I have seen no consistent pattern of impairment either physical or mental. I have known alcoholics who functioned at a very high level. I have seen other drink themselves into stupor and early graves. I have seen smokers who live to 90 and some that die of cancer well before their time. I have seen pot smokers who became idiots (some were actually idiots before they started smoking pot) and I have seen pot smokers who lead very productive and normal lives.

I know people who were caught with small amounts of controlled substances and arrested, the legal ramifications made a mess of their personal lives. It did not change their desire to use, it merely made their lives even more screwed up and difficult.

I do not propose that we "legalize" drugs as much as we decriminalize them and destroy the trafficking business by using legitimate and well regulated methods of producing and distributing the drugs.

Creating laws that make the problem worse doesn't seem like a logical way to deal with a naturally occurring problem.

Criminals will always find ways to make a buck. The beer and liquor distributors of today do not use machine guns to "regulate" their business or deal with competitors but the bootleggers of the prohibition era did. Once we removed the prohibition, the regulated trade became part of the culture. We did not see a huge rise in alcoholism. But we did see fewer deaths and problems related to the trafficking or to poor quality of the product injuring users.

To some people it sounds scary to legalize or decriminalize drugs but with an open mind and the facts about drug use, it starts to make a lot of sense. Many very "conservative" and "liberal" thinking individuals have arrived at the same conclusion.

Prostitution? Do you really want to go there too?
TTU

United States

#23 Apr 15, 2011
no sale wrote:
<quoted text>
Of course drugs can cause human physiological problems.
I do not deny that fact. Alcohol and nicotine also cause damage to the body. But users of nicotine and alcohol can seek help without fear. No so for drug users.
If you keep drugs illegal the physiological damage can be far worse since the users must stay "underground" and the delivery or ingestion methods are usually more risky.(i.e. dirty needles and inconsistent quality of the drugs.)
Heavy use of any chemical can "fry" a brain. Too much exposure to industrial solvents can have the same effect. But we control those substances and educate people to the dangers. Once people go underground the education becomes less effective and is often incorrect and misleading or worse nonexistent.
People will use drugs. There is no way to stop them. Making them illegal just pushes the problem into a different way of dealing with it. Rather than try to force with threats, why not use something more positive that doesn't punish them for their weaknesses but rewards them when they are able to move themselves into a more positive and productive direction?
I've known people who were users of all sorts of drugs, heroin, cocaine, marijuana, nicotine, alcohol, amphetamines and on and on. I have seen no consistent pattern of impairment either physical or mental. I have known alcoholics who functioned at a very high level. I have seen other drink themselves into stupor and early graves. I have seen smokers who live to 90 and some that die of cancer well before their time. I have seen pot smokers who became idiots (some were actually idiots before they started smoking pot) and I have seen pot smokers who lead very productive and normal lives.
I know people who were caught with small amounts of controlled substances and arrested, the legal ramifications made a mess of their personal lives. It did not change their desire to use, it merely made their lives even more screwed up and difficult.
I do not propose that we "legalize" drugs as much as we decriminalize them and destroy the trafficking business by using legitimate and well regulated methods of producing and distributing the drugs.
Creating laws that make the problem worse doesn't seem like a logical way to deal with a naturally occurring problem.
Criminals will always find ways to make a buck. The beer and liquor distributors of today do not use machine guns to "regulate" their business or deal with competitors but the bootleggers of the prohibition era did. Once we removed the prohibition, the regulated trade became part of the culture. We did not see a huge rise in alcoholism. But we did see fewer deaths and problems related to the trafficking or to poor quality of the product injuring users.
To some people it sounds scary to legalize or decriminalize drugs but with an open mind and the facts about drug use, it starts to make a lot of sense. Many very "conservative" and "liberal" thinking individuals have arrived at the same conclusion.
Prostitution? Do you really want to go there too?
Sorry, Not convinced. Oh and your user friends, what are their names again?
no sale

Saint Louis, MO

#24 Apr 15, 2011
TTU wrote:
<quoted text>
Sorry, Not convinced. Oh and your user friends, what are their names again?
My experience has taught me that people who use drugs are not all the same. The reasons for using drugs varies. Drug use does not indicate anything consistent about the users other than that they are drug users.
You have a common mindset that I have frequently encountered.
I did not think you would be convinced.
Exposing you to an opinion different than your own might help you see that the world does not operate as you wish. But more than likely you will continue to think within the limitations you have allowed to be placed upon you.
Don't be silly, I would never tell you any names.

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