Our recommendation: Springboro voters...

Our recommendation: Springboro voters should say 'yes' the first time to school levies

There are 31932 comments on the Dayton Daily News story from Feb 5, 2008, titled Our recommendation: Springboro voters should say 'yes' the first time to school levies. In it, Dayton Daily News reports that:

Recommended local sites More... UD sports info, pictures and discussions Are you a UD sports fan? Whether you like basketball, volleyball, soccer, men's or women's teams -- Doesn't matter -- this site is for ... via Dayton Daily News

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Dayton Daily News.

lol

Springfield, OH

#31925 Aug 31, 2014
ALL ABOUT THE FREE MARKET wrote:
<quoted text>
YES!!! Let your child's mind be controlled by the greedy people whose fortunes are made on the back of a population of people who give them money and use taxpayer money for charter schools only to close their doors within 4 years without returning the money to the people, the taxpayers and shutting the doors on our children. All while chasing the ALL MIGHTY DOLLAR!
EXCELLENT SUGGESTION. You must feel very proficient......
Why do so many so-called conservatives have so much against teachers and school officials who are seemingly succeeding in doing what capitalism is all about. Making (taking) as much money as possible and keeping it for themselves.
How silly all about the free market sounds!

Bet all about the free market doesn't get out of tent of union solidarity very often.

Nothing is Free about the Market and there's no free ride in the
Boro for greedy union classroom teachers on the backs of hard working
Springboro taxpayers! That just wouldn't be prudent now would it?
Another View

Springfield, OH

#31926 Sep 1, 2014
ALL ABOUT THE FREE MARKET wrote:
<quoted text>
Why do so many so-called conservatives have so much against teachers and school officials who are seemingly succeeding in doing what capitalism is all about. Making (taking) as much money
as possible and keeping it for themselves!
It's the way of the conservatives....ASK THEM!
http://statimpact.npr.org/ohio/2013/06/17/gra...
Grading the Teachers: Little Connection Between Teacher Pay and Performance
June 17, 2013/6:15 AM
By Molly Bloom and Patrick O'Donnell
4 comments-email
Lynn ISCHAY/The Plain Dealer

"There is little connection between how much money Ohio teachers make and how much knowledge they impart to students over the course of a single year, according to a StateImpact
Ohio/Plain Dealer analysis of a new measure of teacher performance.
Ohio/Plain Dealer analysis of a new measure of teacher performance.
In fact, that analysis of state data shows that within many school districts, teachers who received the lowest grade in a key aspect of teacher performance known as value-added are paid more on average than teachers who earned the highest grade.
In some ways, these results are no surprise: The way Ohio schools determine teachers' salaries has nothing to do with how well they teach. It has everything to do with how long they've been teaching and whether they have a master's degree.
But the StateImpact/Plain Dealer analysis quantifies the relationship between value-added and Ohio teachers' pay. It also shows that older teachers in Ohio are paid significantly more than their younger colleagues, but did not outperform them in the 2011-12 school year on value-added."
Perhaps we should begin looking at actual performance rather than longevity in a system which precludes firing.
Identifying, compensating, and retaining talented younger teachers will benefit our children much more than over compensating less skilled professionals that whose main claim to fame is length of service.
Our current system of pay discriminates against younger, less compensated employees in favor of older employees with more years of service. Any contract let will by necessity find that the majority of money available of increases is absorbed percentage wise by those making the most, typically those with the greatest number of years of service.
So while if everyone gets a 5% increase, those at the bottom of the pay scale find themselves with less than half the amount of money as those at the top of the pay scales, regardless of performance or ability.
It has become the time to rectify this situation and recognize talent where ever it is in our school system and reward it appropriately.
ALL ABOUT THE FREE MARKET

Eaton, OH

#31927 Sep 1, 2014
Another View wrote:
<quoted text>
http://statimpact.npr.org/ohio/2013/06/17/gra...
Grading the Teachers: Little Connection Between Teacher Pay and Performance
June 17, 2013/6:15 AM
By Molly Bloom and Patrick O'Donnell
4 comments-email
Lynn ISCHAY/The Plain Dealer
"There is little connection between how much money Ohio teachers make and how much knowledge they impart to students over the course of a single year, according to a StateImpact
Ohio/Plain Dealer analysis of a new measure of teacher performance.
Ohio/Plain Dealer analysis of a new measure of teacher performance.
In fact, that analysis of state data shows that within many school districts, teachers who received the lowest grade in a key aspect of teacher performance known as value-added are paid more on average than teachers who earned the highest grade.
In some ways, these results are no surprise: The way Ohio schools determine teachers' salaries has nothing to do with how well they teach. It has everything to do with how long they've been teaching and whether they have a master's degree.
But the StateImpact/Plain Dealer analysis quantifies the relationship between value-added and Ohio teachers' pay. It also shows that older teachers in Ohio are paid significantly more than their younger colleagues, but did not outperform them in the 2011-12 school year on value-added."
Perhaps we should begin looking at actual performance rather than longevity in a system which precludes firing.
Identifying, compensating, and retaining talented younger teachers will benefit our children much more than over compensating less skilled professionals that whose main claim to fame is length of service.
Our current system of pay discriminates against younger, less compensated employees in favor of older employees with more years of service. Any contract let will by necessity find that the majority of money available of increases is absorbed percentage wise by those making the most, typically those with the greatest number of years of service.
So while if everyone gets a 5% increase, those at the bottom of the pay scale find themselves with less than half the amount of money as those at the top of the pay scales, regardless of performance or ability.
It has become the time to rectify this situation and recognize talent where ever it is in our school system and reward it appropriately.
Exactly the point. The older employees are making more money for the same (if not less) work so more power to them. Reagan would be proud.
ALL ABOUT THE FREE MARKET

Eaton, OH

#31928 Sep 1, 2014
I wonder how many "true conservatives" are out there today working.
Working on this liberal, union founded holiday.....instead of staying home and taking advantage of the gift given to them by the left and the likes of the SEA!
The More You Know

Springfield, OH

#31929 Sep 1, 2014
Insanity wrote:
<quoted text>
The career Center is swimming in money now. They have $22,000 per pupil now. They have less than 900 pupils. They are accumulating about one million $ per year. They want to renovate so, they asked all faculty, staff and BOE the questions. " If money were no issue, what would you like to see added or renovated in this career center?" They put everyone’s wish list into a plan and it added up to $46 million, they then quadrupled this to make a 3 mill levy then added a .5 mill safety factor. If this fails they are able to come back and say we reduced it to 3 or 2.5 or 2 and still raise the amount they needed times three to build a enormous facility for 900 junior and senior high school students. What they have also done is to make an adult ed center that is partially paid for by taxpayers. Now Sinclair and any other adult ed center cannot compete with the career center prices because you the taxpayer are supplementing the adult ed at the Career Center. The adult ed part of the careert center is supose to be self funded but did you know you pay for its admin, its facitity, some of its faculty and supplies. So the adult ed is not only supplemented by tax dollars it is also accumulating money in an account we do not get to see.
Everyone should ask them for their five year forecast and you will see an accumulating balance. The five year forecast shows a $15 million surplus, when the whole annual budget is only $14 million, they have a whole years worth of surplus and thye wnat more. Lets talk insanity. Why is 15 million surplus not enough to renovate?
Interesting Questions. Worth Repeating.
point of reference

Springfield, OH

#31930 Sep 1, 2014
ALL ABOUT THE FREE MARKET wrote:
<quoted text>
Why do so many so-called conservatives have so much against teachers and school officials who are seemingly succeeding in doing what capitalism is all about. Making (taking) as much money
as possible and keeping it for themselves!
It's the way of the conservatives....ASK THEM!
Superintendent Petrey was, in fact, recruited & hired by the previous conservative dominated BOE.
ALL ABOUT THE FREE MARKET

Eaton, OH

#31931 Sep 1, 2014
point of reference wrote:
<quoted text>
Superintendent Petrey was, in fact, recruited & hired by the previous conservative dominated BOE.
As was the current SEA contract. Good point.
One Voice Many Concerns

Springfield, OH

#31932 Sep 2, 2014
point of reference wrote:
<quoted text>
Superintendent Petrey was, in fact, recruited & hired by the previous conservative dominated BOE.
It was only two years ago in August 2012 that Todd Petrey was hired by our majority Children First Budgeting Board of Education elected officials and made this statement in the DDN article:

"Where the board's at right now is wanting the highest academic achievement and fiscal responsibility," Petrey said, "That's what I stand for."

How could any of us Springboro Stakeholders have imagined then that Mr. Petrey would fall for the many voices of one future of union solidarity rule against our Children First?
ACCOUNTABILITY

Franksville, WI

#31933 Sep 2, 2014
One Voice Many Concerns wrote:
<quoted text>
It was only two years ago in August 2012 that Todd Petrey was hired by our majority Children First Budgeting Board of Education elected officials and made this statement in the DDN article:
"Where the board's at right now is wanting the highest academic achievement and fiscal responsibility," Petrey said, "That's what I stand for."
How could any of us Springboro Stakeholders have imagined then that Mr. Petrey would fall for the many voices of one future of union solidarity rule against our Children First?
Why don't you ask the board members that interviewed and approved him 2 years ago??? Maybe it's a good thing that majority is no longer the majority. Sounds like you had a severe disagreement with their decision.
About Money and Power

Springfield, OH

#31934 Sep 2, 2014
ACCOUNTABILITY wrote:
<quoted text>
Why don't you ask the board members that interviewed and approved him 2 years ago??? Maybe it's a good thing that majority is no longer the majority. Sounds like you had a severe disagreement with their decision.
"Members of the public should ask the members of the education establishment a simple question:
When is the last time that you, or the organizations that represent you in Columbus, ever advocated for something that benefits students but also resulted in less money or power for your constituency?"
School boards, administrators, superintendents, treasurers, teachers' unions and every kind of specialty group have someone advocating on behalf of their group of adults and vested interests.
The only time they work together is to stop or delay change or to demand more money with no explanation of how they account for new or existing money.
-from website article written by Thomas W. Gunlock
http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/edito... -
ACCOUNTABILITY

Franksville, WI

#31935 Sep 2, 2014
About Money and Power wrote:
<quoted text>
"Members of the public should ask the members of the education establishment a simple question:
When is the last time that you, or the organizations that represent you in Columbus, ever advocated for something that benefits students but also resulted in less money or power for your constituency?"
School boards, administrators, superintendents, treasurers, teachers' unions and every kind of specialty group have someone advocating on behalf of their group of adults and vested interests.
The only time they work together is to stop or delay change or to demand more money with no explanation of how they account for new or existing money.
-from website article written by Thomas W. Gunlock
http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/edito... -
1) Doesn't answer the question, nice deflection.
2) I wonder if he is a "true conservative" and worked on Labor Day instead of taking advantage of the union controlled holiday!
3) Of course he never advocates for his special interest....does he........
ALL HAIL CAPITALISM

Franksville, WI

#31936 Sep 2, 2014
About Money and Power wrote:
<quoted text>
"Members of the public should ask the members of the education establishment a simple question:
When is the last time that you, or the organizations that represent you in Columbus, ever advocated for something that benefits students but also resulted in less money or power for your constituency?"
School boards, administrators, superintendents, treasurers, teachers' unions and every kind of specialty group have someone advocating on behalf of their group of adults and vested interests.
The only time they work together is to stop or delay change or to demand more money with no explanation of how they account for new or existing money.
-from website article written by Thomas W. Gunlock
http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/edito... -
4) The free market is ALL about MONEY and POWER. Capitalism at it's finest!! Survival of the RICHEST!!!!
R U 4 Sure

Springfield, OH

#31938 Sep 2, 2014
ALL HAIL CAPITALISM wrote:
<quoted text>
4) The free market is ALL about MONEY and POWER. Capitalism at it's finest!! Survival of the RICHEST!!!!
Thomas Gunlock, member of Ohio Department of Education, states that "Education is mostly about power and money and who gets to control both."

Since the OEA is the controlling party of politics that has been in power over our money since 1983, it does appear that the OEA has taken over the non-profit big business of Education, and the Unions are the ones making big profits off Taxpayers dollars.
SAY AGAIN

Springfield, OH

#31939 Sep 2, 2014
About Money and Power wrote:
<quoted text>
"Members of the public should ask the members of the education establishment a simple question:
When is the last time that you, or the organizations that represent you in Columbus, ever advocated for something that benefits students but also resulted in less money or power for your constituency?"
School boards, administrators, superintendents, treasurers, teachers' unions and every kind of specialty group have someone advocating on behalf of their group of adults and vested interests.
The only time they work together is to stop or delay change or to demand more money with no explanation of how they account for new or existing money.
-from website article written by Thomas W. Gunlock
http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/edito... -
Very much worth repeating.
Doug Wiedeman

Cleveland, OH

#31940 Sep 4, 2014
Reynoldsburg School District is in contract negotiations with teachers union. Lets see if we can identify the steps in the playbook.

This from May 2014, the opening gambit from the school district.

The Reynoldsburg school board wants to overhaul how the district pays its teachers by eliminating scheduled raises and its health-insurance plan.

Instead, teachers would receive pay increases based entirely on their ratings in the state’s new evaluation system. They also would be eligible for bonuses, including one of $30,000, if their schools performed well on state report cards and they performed work beyond their classroom duties.

Rather than provide health-insurance coverage, the district would give teachers cash to purchase their own insurance.

The school board detailed its plans in its opening contract proposal last week as it started negotiations with the Reynoldsburg Education Association, the teachers union. The current teachers pact expires on July 31.

“We will become a community and school district that reveres good teaching by paying our best teachers salaries and bonuses that rank among the highest in our region,” according to the proposal, which The Dispatch received through a public-records request.“For teachers who have not yet attained excellence, our compensation policies will encourage constant and rapid improvement.”

For those who don’t measure up?

“Our compensation policies will encourage them to look elsewhere,” the document says.

Union leaders said they would not comment on negotiations.

“The board is looking to create a system that is very rewarding for great teachers because we want to attract, develop and retain the best teachers to put before our children,” said district spokeswoman Tricia Moore.

“The administration and association spent a year learning about evaluating performance-based compensation systems. It’s not a new topic.”

Tom Ash, director of governmental relations for the Buckeye Association of School Administrators, said he’s aware of some districts that are working on other methods of paying teachers than the traditional salary schedule, which awards teachers additional pay for years of service and education.

But he hasn’t heard of a district that provides cash payments in lieu of insurance.

Michele Prater, spokeswoman for the Ohio Education Association, the statewide teachers union, said Reynoldsburg’s proposal is “highly unusual.”

Based on the state’s new teacher-evaluation system, Reynoldsburg teachers rated “accomplished”— the highest overall rating — would be in line for a 4 percent raise, according to the board’s plan.

“Skilled” teachers would get a 2 percent raise while “developing” teachers would earn a 1 percent raise. Teachers rated in the lowest category,“ineffective,” would not get a pay bump.

Teachers in schools with a composite grade of an A on the state report card would receive a $500 bonus; those in schools with a B would get $250.

The proposal would continue a $2,000 “student incentive award” the district has had in place for nearly a decade. Teachers can apply by submitting their principal’s endorsement and proof of student improvement, such as test scores. The superintendent, with the school board’s approval, decides who gets an award.

Under the school board’s plan, teachers could also apply for a $30,000 “fellowship award” if their student performance was significantly higher than expectations and they had accepted increased responsibilities that have “high value” to the district.

The school board’s health-insurance proposal would provide teachers with an annual cash payment to be used on an insurance plan of their choice. The proposal did not say how much that would be.
Doug Wiedeman

Cleveland, OH

#31941 Sep 4, 2014
Step 2

File Unfair Labor Practices Suit against greedy school board then rally with concerned parents with small children in tow.

June 30, 2014

The Reynoldsburg Education Association has filed an unfair labor practices complaint against the school district because of an online entry giving details of the district’s contract proposal to the teachers’ union.

Meanwhile, about 125 teachers dressed in red T-shirts, with some towing toddlers or pushing strollers, marched in front of the Reynoldsburg City Schools’ administration building today, June 30 “to voice their disappointment” in the school board.

Carrying signs that stated,“High stakes are for tomatoes, not students,”“Honk if you love a teacher” or “We say no to merit pay,” teachers said the district is not offering them a fair contract.

Amid loud honks from cars driving by on East Main Street, Reynoldsburg Education Association (REA) spokesperson Gina Daniels said,“So far, we have been disappointed in the proposal the board has offered and how they have disrespected us during the process.”

Daniels said that disrespect includes the district publishing a “frequently asked questions” entry on its website giving details of the district’s proposed contract, at reyn.org/FAQ.axpx .

“We filed an unfair practices complaint with the State Employment Relations Board last week, because of that FAQ,” she said.

She said negotiations between teachers and the district broke down Thursday, June 26, when the school board negotiating team “left the bargaining table, refusing to negotiate further until a federal mediator could intervene.”

Bargaining was scheduled to resume June 30 at a neutral location with that federal mediator, Daniels said.

Basing salary increases entirely on merit pay, which puts too big an emphasis on standardized testing and eliminating group health insurance are major sticking points in the new contract, she said.

District leaders could not be reached for comment early Monday.
Doug Wiedeman

Cleveland, OH

#31942 Sep 4, 2014
Step 3

Bring in union members from outside the district to agitate and threaten. make it seem like everything is unraveling.

About 500 people, mostly teachers, attended last night’s school-board meeting to protest the board’s initial contract proposal, which includes eliminating teachers’ scheduled raises and their health-care plan.

Teachers’ union members from Columbus, Dayton, Bexley, Gahanna-Jefferson, Groveport Madison, Licking Heights, South-Western, Westerville and Whitehall also showed up, as did a representative from the Ohio Education Association.

“If there is ever a time to help make a stand, this is it,” said Alisha Wilson, president of the Whitehall Education Association.

Wilson said she’s never taken a political stand in her seven years as union president. She attended the meeting with nine other Whitehall teachers — all of them wearing their union T-shirts.

What happens in Reynoldsburg has the potential to cause a ripple effect in other districts, Reynoldsburg board member Joe Begeny said.

“No one has done a merit-pay system like what is being proposed,” he said.“Reynoldsburg has always been a district everyone can look to lead the way.”

Under the school board’s proposal, which The Dispatch received through a public-records request, teachers would receive pay increases based entirely on their ratings in the state’s new evaluation system.

They also would be eligible for bonuses, including one of $30,000, if their schools performed well on state report cards and they performed work beyond their classroom duties.

Rather than provide health-insurance coverage, the district would give teachers cash to purchase their own insurance.

Reynoldsburg educators, parents, students and community members gathered at a rally prior to the board meeting. Then, they burst into chants as they made their way to the performing-arts center at Reynoldsburg High School’s Summit campus.

For 90 minutes, they raised concerns about the board’s contract proposal and its impact on teacher morale and student learning. They noted that teachers have already made many concessions, including taking on larger classes and sacrificing raises.

High-school teacher Gina Daniels talked about her decision to leave the district for a job in Licking Heights.

That was partially to teach in a district where she lives, she said. But part of it is due to the contract proposal.

“My decision came about by one district continuing to make decisions that I don’t think are best for students and another district who promises the potential to allow me to focus on helping kids,” said Daniels, who was the spokeswoman for the Reynoldsburg Education Association.

Since last August, 50 teachers have resigned from the district, according to the district. Only 28 teachers resigned during the same time period last year.

But contract negotiations are not the only reason why teachers are leaving, officials said.

Some are leaving because their spouse has been relocated or they were offered a job closer to home. Some have resigned because they weren’t a good fit in the district, district spokeswoman Tricia Moore said.

But several speakers at last night’s meeting spoke out against merit pay, including 12-year-old Abi Swift.

“Is it fair to the teachers to have their pay dependent on our scores?” asked Swift, who will be a seventh-grader at Waggoner Road Junior High this fall.“Is it fair to the students to feel that kind of pressure?”

Since contract talks started in May, teachers have gathered outside of the administrative offices and rallied with community members to voice their disappointment in the school board.

Last month, the Reynoldsburg Education Association filed an unfair-labor-practice charge against the board for posting details of bargaining proposals on its Website.

Both sides last met with a federal mediator on June 30. Talks are scheduled to resume in August.

The teachers’ contract expires at the end of this month.
Doug Wiedeman

Cleveland, OH

#31943 Sep 4, 2014
Step 4

Bring forward children to speak in the union's behalf beseeching the school board to not let their teachers strike. The authorize the union to strike.

Teachers in the Reynoldsburg City School District have authorized their union to issue a 10-day strike notice to administrators.

The authorization was given to the Reynoldsburg Education Association Friday night.

Administrators and union representatives have not come to a contract agreement after several months of negotiations and mediation sessions.

Teachers are scheduled to report to work on August 11 and students are scheduled to return to school on August 13.

The 10-day strike notice can be filed with the state at any time.
lack of accountability

Springfield, OH

#31944 Sep 4, 2014
Why do Springboro's students annually earn such good grades?
Is it because Boro students are extremely good test-takers? No.
Is it because Springboro parents are superior to other parents outside the district? No, not really.
Is it because Springboro's teachers are superior to teachers outside the district? No.

The reason Springboro students have exceptionally high average grades is because teachers are allowed to take lots of extra credit & homework credit and merge them with test score averages, which in many cases, is quite low.

To make matters worse, certian teachers around the district have resurrected an awful tradition of bribing students to bring in kleenex/ hand soap to class in exchange for extra credit points. These educators claim to be role models?
Doug Wiedeman

Cleveland, OH

#31945 Sep 4, 2014
Step 5

Don't budge on anything for the union membership. Keep saying its all about educating the children then complain you have hard children to teach. Tell everyone the good teachers are leaving in droves, our teachers are the best. We want to be treated FAIR.

Any of this sound familiar? I wonder what the definition of FAIR is in Reynoldsburg.

During last week’s two-day negotiating session with a federal mediator, district administrators scaled back their goal for teacher compensation reform – at least for now.

Their latest salary proposal, as described on the district’s website, appears to be a hybrid of the current structure and what was originally proposed. It preserves the current salary schedule but provides smaller step raises, with additional increases based on performance starting in year two. It doubles bonuses based on school performance, but scales back the maximum fellowship award to just $4,000.

It also calls for re-opening negotiations on salary only prior to year three of the contract,“allowing more time to develop a feasible and attractive plan for moving forward.”

The Reynoldsburg Education Association, the teachers’ bargaining unit, has rejected this latest proposal.

“The REA supports a cap on class size and a fair compensation package that will help Reynoldsburg attract and retain excellent teachers,” the union said in a press release issued Friday night.

Kathy Evans, spokesperson for the REA, said in a phone interview Monday that the union does not believe a merit pay system will serve to attract and retain good teachers, as the district claims it would.

She says in addition to the pay issue, teachers are concerned that class sizes in recent years have grown excessively large.

Reynoldsburg City Schools has not returned phone calls or emails seeking comment. It says on its web site that it is preparing in the event that teachers strike.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Springboro Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News The 25 Most Dangerous Cities in the U.S. Are Mo... (Nov '10) 11 hr OMTE 20,386
dirty drug detective (Jun '13) 23 hr Expose Evil 4
Regarding NATO: Sat The Duke of Hazard 3
Welfare state? Sat The Duke of Hazard 3
please can anyone tell me about chris bishop? h... (Apr '09) Jul 22 USA H8s pimps 5
not John Agenbroad too ? (Oct '08) Jul 1 Missy from Troy 324
Clearcreek Twp. places fire chief on paid leave Jun '16 Seenthiscoming 1

Springboro Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

Springboro Mortgages