Woman's case draws Right to Life action

Woman's case draws Right to Life action

There are 88 comments on the La Crosse Tribune story from Aug 19, 2007, titled Woman's case draws Right to Life action. In it, La Crosse Tribune reports that:

The Wisconsin Right to Life organization weighed in Wednesday on a court case that seeks to end life-sustaining treatment for a La Crosse woman who must be kept sedated to keep her on a feeding tube. via La Crosse Tribune

Join the discussion below, or Read more at La Crosse Tribune.

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Since: Oct 06

Location hidden

#96 Aug 30, 2007
Svaha wrote:
<quoted text>
Thanks Patti. I did find this one but nothing to say how he did then and how he's doing now. I'm hoping he did okay.
Me too. I found nothing beyond the 2006 date.
Jan

Victoria, Canada

#97 Aug 30, 2007
hornback12 wrote:
<quoted text>so you would be grateful if we decided that your thinking was crazy and locked you up until you thought like we did?
If I were in a situation similar to some of the cases described by Buster, yes, I'd be grateful. Maybe not at the time, but eventually.

The case of the man who loved his hair more than his life really bothers me. I can't believe he was willing to subject his friends and relatives to grief, simply to avoid temporary loss of hair.It's probably the worst example of pure selfishness that I have ever heard of. And I really believe that if he had been forced to go through the treatment, he would have been alive and happy several months later when the hair grew back, and nobody would have been dead or grieving.

Since: Oct 06

Location hidden

#98 Aug 30, 2007
Jan wrote:
<quoted text>If I were in a situation similar to some of the cases described by Buster, yes, I'd be grateful. Maybe not at the time, but eventually.
The case of the man who loved his hair more than his life really bothers me. I can't believe he was willing to subject his friends and relatives to grief, simply to avoid temporary loss of hair.It's probably the worst example of pure selfishness that I have ever heard of. And I really believe that if he had been forced to go through the treatment, he would have been alive and happy several months later when the hair grew back, and nobody would have been dead or grieving.
Treatments, you mean. A course of chemo or radiation treatments can last for months, leaving one nauseous and feeling weak and depleted.

It may save one's life or not. No one knows for sure, but it should certainly be one's own choice if he wants to go though all that. I have seen people going though such treatments and it sure does not look as if they are having fun......
bustertheboa

Hershey, PA

#99 Aug 30, 2007
Jan wrote:
<quoted text>If I were in a situation similar to some of the cases described by Buster, yes, I'd be grateful. Maybe not at the time, but eventually.
And I am sure that many would agree with you. But many also would not. I have seen instances where patients were resentful and outright bitter about receiving treatment they did not want. Medical battery exists as a concept and actionable cause for a reason, Jan.

The other issue is whether gratitude should be the metric used to guage appropriateness of care. There is a well known case frequently brought up in ethics courses involving a man who was severely burned and wanted treatment stopped because it was too painful. At the time, doctors and nurses overrode his requests, citing that pain medications -- while obviously not enough to abrogate pain -- had diminished his capacity. So he was treated over his express objections, under the presumption that he "would thank them later."

Well, it didn't work out that way. The man sued for medical battery. Of course one of the issues that came up was that the man was not unhappy to be alive, but he still nonetheless felt violated and believed that he should have had the right to refuse treatment. He clearly was not "grateful."
Yomomma

AOL

#100 Aug 30, 2007
Jan wrote:
<quoted text>If I were in a situation similar to some of the cases described by Buster, yes, I'd be grateful. Maybe not at the time, but eventually.
The case of the man who loved his hair more than his life really bothers me. I can't believe he was willing to subject his friends and relatives to grief, simply to avoid temporary loss of hair.It's probably the worst example of pure selfishness that I have ever heard of. And I really believe that if he had been forced to go through the treatment, he would have been alive and happy several months later when the hair grew back, and nobody would have been dead or grieving.
Jan... You just don't get it do you? A much as this man was probably loved (and now missed) by family and friends,It was never about THEM. To think that a patients decisions about medical intervention should be based on what others around them think or feel is positively SELFISH in my book.
Va Gent

AOL

#101 Aug 30, 2007
Yomomma just told it ALL with that last statemnt. This is what it is all about & has been all along that a lot of people can't seem to get through their heads. It's ALWAYS been about the patient. Always has been & ALWAYS will be. That is UNLESS "certain" people get their way. I have always stood for CHOICE in these kinds of matters & I always will. As far as I am concerned if a "dying" person or someone who is unable to live a good noraml life & has appointed someone else to honor their wishes, then that is the MOST RESPECTFULL thing that can possibly be done for that patient.
hornback12

Lexington, KY

#102 Aug 30, 2007
Jan wrote:
<quoted text>If I were in a situation similar to some of the cases described by Buster, yes, I'd be grateful. Maybe not at the time, but eventually.
The case of the man who loved his hair more than his life really bothers me. I can't believe he was willing to subject his friends and relatives to grief, simply to avoid temporary loss of hair.It's probably the worst example of pure selfishness that I have ever heard of. And I really believe that if he had been forced to go through the treatment, he would have been alive and happy several months later when the hair grew back, and nobody would have been dead or grieving.
the thing that you never seem to grasp is that we make the decision whether or not you are sane. doesn't make any difference whether or not you are or not... only that we decide for you. crazy people usually think that they are the only sane ones around .
bustertheboa

Hershey, PA

#103 Aug 30, 2007
Jan wrote:
<quoted text>The case of the man who loved his hair more than his life really bothers me. I can't believe he was willing to subject his friends and relatives to grief, simply to avoid temporary loss of hair.It's probably the worst example of pure selfishness that I have ever heard of.
I don't disagree with you. But the interesting issue I brought up earlier is that the ONLY time we become concerned about a patient's competence or capacity (short of a known history of mental illness) is when the patient makes a decision we disagree with. ONLY then do we mandate that a patient defend or explain his/her decision.

Had the man agreed to chemo and radiation, then we probably would have just left it at that. No further discussion would have been required or expected. He would have made a decision that we all consider to be "good," and ergo presumed competent/capable.

But suppose the reason the man consented to the therapy was because he believed the chemo and radiation would endow him with superhuman abilities? He was envisioning something along the lines of Marvel comics X-Men or the Fantastic Four, or the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. What if THAT was the basis for his consent -- NOT cure of his malignancy? What would that tell us about his competence/capacity??

Of course such is entirely hypothetical, but it raises the issue that a "good" choice is not necessarily reflective of a person being competent or capable. Likewise, a choice that is "bad" is not perforce indicative of incompetence or incapacity.

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