omg........are you serious??

omg........are you serious??

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udontno

Maryville, TN

#1 Jul 26, 2009
i would just like to state a few facts about the recent dog attack. first off neither dog is a pit bull. one is a boxer that is 8 years old. the other is a mix breed that was adopted from the humane society. he is about 8 or 9 months old. i know his mother was not a pit because the puppies were still caged with there mother. yes the dogs were chained. they were actulally still dragging the chains when picked up by animal control. both dogs have been socialized with many different children and adults. they have never acted aggressivly toward anyone. many of the neighbor hood children have been to the house where the dogs are and played with them. and for those that say the dogs never recieved any interaction other than feeding i find it kinda sad that you think you need to spend your day checking to see if these dogs are being interacted with. please do not think that we are trying to dispute the fact that an innocent woman was hurt. according to her the boxer did nothing. we are more than willing to responsibility for what our dog done and pay the hospital bills. we are truly sorry. we feel the whole story should be told since the newspaper and unknowing neighbors are not stating the facts. no we do not neglect our dogs and no we do not just let them roam freely and NO NEITHER DOG IS A PIT BULL!!
Village Clown

Monteagle, TN

#2 Jul 26, 2009
A dog bite is a Dog bite
live in neighbour

Easley, SC

#3 Jul 26, 2009
this lady and her husband they both walk sometimes together sometimes not they normally carry a golf club with them and hit many dogs uncalled for one dog come up with a missing eye.They don't get along with anyone on any street.They have put many of there on dogs to sleep if they don't mind them. Yet I don't think she deserved what happen to her but things do come home to you. Ask anyone that lives in Rim Rock Mesa and I'm sure you will get the same as I have just written. They are very rude people. And YES all dogs should be on a leash.No one deseves what happen to her.
wow

Hephzibah, GA

#4 Jul 26, 2009
different eyes = different perspectives

Since: Jul 09

Columbia, SC

#5 Jul 26, 2009
I love my pits!

Honestly I believe any dog is capable to attacking a person at anytime especially considering how they have been raised. Any dog is also capable to turning on their owner at anytime regardless of what breed they are. If they're going to outlaw pit bulls then they should just go ahead and outlaw every kind of canine known to man.. even small dogs!
I have a year and half old blue female pit and a 8 month old rednose that my husband and I have raised since they were 4 or 5 weeks old. They have never even attempted to growl at anyone or anything (other animals). I think this whole thing is ridiculous. Granted I do agree people need to raise their animals right and not just let them roam freely around neighborhoods.

“Seconds Count”

Since: Jan 09

Location hidden

#6 Jul 27, 2009
Now that was interesting..Not pits. Then another poster states that these ppl carried a golf club to hit animals with. Let me give you a little story to think about. My sister is a Pit Lover. She had owned this Pit since it was a 6 week old pup. Yes this dog was very protective of home and family. Nikita stayed in the yard. Everyone was informed to not show any aggression on her property towards her or her children or grandchildren w/ signs posted. My grandchildren played with Nikita. One day the dog was stolen from the yard. My sister looked daily till she found her dog. Some one put a rope around the dogs neck, apparently dragged the dog down the highway. She was found in the woods a 1/4 mile from the home with rope still around the dogs neck and its skin removed from dragging. You do not act aggressive with dogs...ever. I don't believe one should maul another individual for no reason but, from the sound of things she was aggressive and most likely made eye contact with these animals. Animal haters need to walk in parks where there are no animals..Bad attitudes bring aggression. I have dobermans, in a fenced yard. They go out to play but, live inside. A young boy maybe 12 would come by and throw rocks at my dogs in the yard. The dogs came to dislike the boy, wonder why?

Since: Jul 09

Columbia, SC

#7 Jul 27, 2009
wellawareofu wrote:
Now that was interesting..Not pits. Then another poster states that these ppl carried a golf club to hit animals with. Let me give you a little story to think about. My sister is a Pit Lover. She had owned this Pit since it was a 6 week old pup. Yes this dog was very protective of home and family. Nikita stayed in the yard. Everyone was informed to not show any aggression on her property towards her or her children or grandchildren w/ signs posted. My grandchildren played with Nikita. One day the dog was stolen from the yard. My sister looked daily till she found her dog. Some one put a rope around the dogs neck, apparently dragged the dog down the highway. She was found in the woods a 1/4 mile from the home with rope still around the dogs neck and its skin removed from dragging. You do not act aggressive with dogs...ever. I don't believe one should maul another individual for no reason but, from the sound of things she was aggressive and most likely made eye contact with these animals. Animal haters need to walk in parks where there are no animals..Bad attitudes bring aggression. I have dobermans, in a fenced yard. They go out to play but, live inside. A young boy maybe 12 would come by and throw rocks at my dogs in the yard. The dogs came to dislike the boy, wonder why?
Thank You! I completely agree with what you said above. If a person hit another human with a golf club would that human not act aggressively also?
My Humble Opinion

Cookeville, TN

#8 Jul 27, 2009
Friends of mine have had pits, dobermans, min-pins, chihuahuas, poodles, and much more. I'm a cat person, but have NEVER had a problem with a pit. Actually, the only dog that ever attacked me, was a golden retriever, owned by a police officer... I was 7, it was dark, and on my parents property. Why are people so afraid of pit bulls? The name: "pit bull" says alot. They're very physically strong, large dogs, but really, they're just babies. Any human can act the aggressive, hateful, and hold a vengeance, but we're not banning all people from society because how a few were treated and taught to treat others are we? No, we're not. So why should we treat 4-legged beloved family members this way? We shouldn't.
My Humble Opinion

Cookeville, TN

#9 Jul 27, 2009
Below are some facts about pit bulls. I've also included the website.

FACTS
1. Pit bulls do NOT have locking jaws. No dog of any breed has ever been found to possess a mechanism in their jaw which would allow them to "lock" their top and bottom jaw together. There is no such thing as a locking jaw!
2. Pit bulls WILL let go after they have bitten down. Dogs bite for many reasons. The enormous majority of dog bites (from any breed) are nothing more than a nip or snap - a warning. Some dogs clamp down hard on prey objects - hence the popularity of tug toys, stuffed animals, and rope toys. Similarly, pit bulls were once bred and taught to cling to a bull's nose despite thrashing, tossing, and gouging. They love to hold on to things! But they are also extremely obedient. A properly raised pit bull will yield to his owner's command.
3. Pit bulls are NOT genetically bred to kill people! From the very beginning, pit bulls have been bred to be as human-friendly as possible. It would not make any sense for bull baiters or dog fighters to own a human-aggressive dog! Even these inhumane individuals have to handle their dogs, often in the heat of a fight. Responsible dog breeders understand that dogs are for companionship and love, not for illicit activities like dogfighting and attacking people! Responsible pit bulldog breeders understand the wonderful qualities that pit bulls have. They are interested in breeding quality dogs with excellent temperaments.
4. Pit bulls are good for plenty of things besides dogfighting. Pit bulls have excelled in many working-dog sports such as agility, search-and-rescue, tracking, weight pulling, carting, Shutzhund, hunting, obedience, therapy, and more! They also very loving, loyal, gentle, and attentive, making them ideal pet dogs.
5. Pit bulls are NOT always aggressive. It is the OWNER that ultimately decides how his or her dog will act in certain situations. Pit bulls are naturally very friendly towards strangers, but they will become aggressive if their owner teaches them or forces them to be that way.
6. Pit bulls CAN be trained and controlled. The pit bulldog is a highly trainable breed. They are intelligent, obedient dogs. They love to please their owner. They are very pack-oriented and do very well under strong, fair leadership. When properly trained and socialized from a young age, the pet pit bull will accept their owner's control without challenge or question.
My Humble Opinion

Cookeville, TN

#10 Jul 27, 2009
7. Pit bulls are just as predictable as any other dog. Most people who say that a dog is "unpredictable" simply don't understand dogs. They believe the stories of people who were "just petting the dog, and suddenly it went crazy and bit me!" In the overwhelming majority of these cases, the victim simply doesn't understand or has missed canine warning signs. For more information on dog behavior and aggression, I recommend "The Culture Clash" by Jean Donaldson.
Truly "unpredictable" dogs are very rare. Some of these dogs have a mental disorder or disease that causes their unpredictable behavior.
8. Pit bulls can feel pain. They are not superdogs. They are just like any other dog.
9. The taste of blood has nothing to do with a dog's behavior. Imagine you're a person that doesn't know anything about dogs, so you fail to notice that your dog is displaying subtle warning signs of impending aggression. One day, the dog has finally had enough, and bites you. The bite successfully gets you to back off. Next time the dog feels threatened, he bites again. It worked the first time, after all. Subsequent bites have nothing to do with the "taste of blood". In reality, the dog is simply employing a proven successful strategy for dealing with things that are scary or threatening.
10. There is no accurate way to determine the pressure of a dog's bite. Although there have been studies to attempt to answer this question, the PSI (pounds per square inch) tends to vary greatly depending on who you talk to. In many cases the number seems to have been completely made up, or pulled from a source (i.e. newspaper) that has invented some ridiculously high number. I have heard: 1000 PSI, 1800 PSI, 2000 PSI, and "10 times the strength of Rottweiler jaws". None of this is based in reality.
In real life a dog's bite strength is determined by a wide variety of factors. While these include the dog's size and individual jaw strength, the severity of a bite is primarily determined by the dog's intent (i.e. aggression, fear, warning snap, playful nip), the victim's behavior (twisting or yanking the body part being bitten can increase the damage), the dog's training, and so on. Scientific experiments indicate that trained bite dogs (of a variety of breeds) can bite at a little over 300 PSI maximum.
Interestingly, recent attempts to measure a dog's jaw strength have indicated that pit bulls have much lower bite pressure than some other breeds, putting lie to the idea that pit bulls have more bite power than any other breed. For more details, check out http://www.understand-a-bull.com/PitbullInfor...
My Humble Opinion

Cookeville, TN

#11 Jul 27, 2009
11. There are NO "rare" pit bull coat or nose colors. Historically, pit bulls have been bred for performance and temperament, not appearance. This means that pit bulls come in all different colors, shapes, and sizes. "Blue" coats (which are really just diluted black or grey coats) are in fact a fad color right now, and greedy breeders are churning out "blue" dogs to make money off the fad, without concern for temperament or health. Similarly, "red nosed" pit bulls are very common. White pit bulls are often deaf. For more details about "rare" pit bulls, visit: http://www.realpitbull.com/myths.html (bottom of page)
Potential pit bull owners who are looking to obtain a pit bull would be wise to steer clear of breeders who are breeding specifically for certain colors. Such breeders are in it for the money and could care less about the health or temperament of their dogs. Heck, why not adopt a pit bull rather than support backyard breeders and puppy mills? You can find purebred pit bulls of all colors waiting desperately for a home in shelters and rescue groups across the country.
12. No scientific studies have determined the actual pit bull population in the U.S. Random percentages seem to come out of thin air and are frequently bounced around in media reports without any legitimate source to back up such an assertion. I have heard population estimates ranging from 1% to 8% or more. Still more problematic is the disagreement as to what a "pit bull" really is - and whether "pit mixes" should be included. Pit bulls are undeniably a very popular and prolific breed-type. Some places, such as Oakland, CA, report that more "pit bulls" are registered with the city than any other breed. A few studies estimate that U.S. shelter "pit bull" populations reach 33% on average, and up to 50% or more in larger cities. The prevalence of pit bulls in shelters indicates not only an overpopulation problem, but also that a significant number of pit bulls are owned by irresponsible owners and breeders when compared to other breeds and breed-types. Unfortunately, however, without a very thorough and careful demographic study of "pit bulls" and their owners - something which has yet to be accomplished on a nationwide scale and may very well prove impossible - any pit bull population estimate is little more than a vague guessing game.

http://www.happypitbull.com/basics/myths.html...
My Humble Opinion

Cookeville, TN

#12 Jul 27, 2009
# Pit bulls do NOT have locking jaws. No dog of any breed has ever been found to possess a mechanism in their jaw which would allow them to "lock" their top and bottom jaw together. There is no such thing as a locking jaw!

# Pit bulls WILL let go after they have bitten down. Dogs bite for many reasons. The enormous majority of dog bites (from any breed) are nothing more than a nip or snap - a warning. Some dogs clamp down hard on prey objects - hence the popularity of tug toys, stuffed animals, and rope toys. Similarly, pit bulls were once bred and taught to cling to a bull's nose despite thrashing, tossing, and gouging. They love to hold on to things! But they are also extremely obedient. A properly raised pit bull will yield to his owner's command.

# Pit bulls are NOT genetically bred to kill people! From the very beginning, pit bulls have been bred to be as human-friendly as possible. It would not make any sense for bull baiters or dog fighters to own a human-aggressive dog! Even these inhumane individuals have to handle their dogs, often in the heat of a fight. Responsible dog breeders understand that dogs are for companionship and love, not for illicit activities like dogfighting and attacking people! Responsible pit bulldog breeders understand the wonderful qualities that pit bulls have. They are interested in breeding quality dogs with excellent temperaments.

# Pit bulls are good for plenty of things besides dogfighting. Pit bulls have excelled in many working-dog sports such as agility, search-and-rescue, tracking, weight pulling, carting, Shutzhund, hunting, obedience, therapy, and more! They also very loving, loyal, gentle, and attentive, making them ideal pet dogs.

# Pit bulls are NOT always aggressive. It is the OWNER that ultimately decides how his or her dog will act in certain situations. Pit bulls are naturally very friendly towards strangers, but they will become aggressive if their owner teaches them or forces them to be that way.

# Pit bulls CAN be trained and controlled. The pit bulldog is a highly trainable breed. They are intelligent, obedient dogs. They love to please their owner. They are very pack-oriented and do very well under strong, fair leadership. When properly trained and socialized from a young age, the pet pit bull will accept their owner's control without challenge or question.
youre kidding

Columbia, SC

#13 Jul 27, 2009
so exactly WHY do you think this ELDERLY woman had to walk using a golf club? WHY do you think she had to swing at animals? She has a RIGHT to walk in her OWN neighborhood without worrying about dogs biting and chasing her.
A lady was out jogging by my house (not in this area) and had to call her husband to pick her up because she was afraid to keep jogging because of the dogs. I can't walk in my own neighborhood because of dogs and I don't have a bad attitude towards dogs, nor have I ever hurt one.
Obviously 'my humble opinions' source was from a "Pro pitt" site. biased maybe? I don't know.
My Humble Opinion

Cookeville, TN

#14 Jul 27, 2009
Actually "you're kidding" - If you had bothered to take the time to read, they're FACTS. And I also mentioned, that I'm NOT a "dog lover" - so I think YOU need to take the time to READ, before jumping on the bandwagon of hatred. NOWHERE on my posts does it say to let any pet run freely, now does it? Its all in how ANY animal was raised, I've even seen violent pigs, for the love of all things Christ! I think you're just bent out of shape because you don't like pit bulls, well they probably don't like you, either. In fact, an pit can be owned and raised in a multi-million dollar mansion, and be the biggest, fun-loving baby ever... but its sister or brother can be raised in a horrible upbringing, and be abused, which will make it abusive. Maybe you should all try having this conversation with someone who has worked with animals. Then you will understand.
youre kidding

Columbia, SC

#15 Jul 27, 2009
My Humble Opinion wrote:
Actually "you're kidding" - If you had bothered to take the time to read, they're FACTS. And I also mentioned, that I'm NOT a "dog lover" - so I think YOU need to take the time to READ, before jumping on the bandwagon of hatred. NOWHERE on my posts does it say to let any pet run freely, now does it? Its all in how ANY animal was raised, I've even seen violent pigs, for the love of all things Christ! I think you're just bent out of shape because you don't like pit bulls, well they probably don't like you, either. In fact, an pit can be owned and raised in a multi-million dollar mansion, and be the biggest, fun-loving baby ever... but its sister or brother can be raised in a horrible upbringing, and be abused, which will make it abusive. Maybe you should all try having this conversation with someone who has worked with animals. Then you will understand.
you're getting awfully aggressive yourself there! Why exactly are you feeling such hostility? I didn't say YOU were biased. I was CONSIDERING the POSSIBILITY that the "facts" listed on this particular website 'might' be biased. If YOU had read, you would have understood that.
My Humble Opinion

Cookeville, TN

#16 Jul 27, 2009
Not hostile, I'm pointing emphasis on the fact you didn't read what was said, and if you look up the facts from any vets, they will say the SAME thing.

Have I had a problem with some dogs? Yes, I have. I called it to the owners attention, and when it wasn't handled, talked to the Animal Control officer, who handled it.

This is like saying all cats should be banned because they hiss, swat, bite, and scratch... its silly. Here, lets ban Mustangs because someone got trampled by one (no, they didn't... just makin a point here), and while we're at it we'll ban Angus bulls because somebody got chased after wearing red to a rodeo. Are you seeing a pattern here? Its what you make of the situation, that makes it so ridiculous. I'm a lil off topic here, but I just think that any animal... and I do mean ANY, can become aggressive and hostile when provoked.

Why did this woman carry a club? Probably because a dog would approach her, tail wagging, and she probably smacked it... over and over, then wondered why the dog became aggressive. Think about it. Common sense.
youre kidding

Columbia, SC

#17 Jul 27, 2009
I'm trying to understand what you're saying, but surely you know what it's like to go for a walk or bike ride and have dogs frighten you without provocation. If not, then you must not live in the country like I do. My in-laws live 1/4 mile from me. I used to take my children for a walk to their house, but I don't feel as though I can do that anymore. Their neighbors have a VICIOUS dog (a rot or something). It is kept in a cage, but it is so aggressive and hostile, even within that cage, that I'm afraid to take my small children for a walk to their grandparent's house. This is not the result of anything that I have done or my children have done, but that dog is so vicious that I'm scared to death of even the possibility of that thing getting out of it's cage while we are nearby.

I'm not talking about pits or any dog banning. But I do understand feeling the need to carry a stick or even a golf club for protection.
youre kidding

Columbia, SC

#18 Jul 27, 2009
Here are some 'facts' for you:

Q: Why do I always read about pit bulls in the news?
When a pit bull attacks, the damage inflicted may be catastrophic. The media understands this as do law enforcement officers. For this reason, pit bull attacks are regarded as a serious public safety threat and are reported accordingly. Social tension is also a reason why pit bull attacks are more newsworthy. The pit bull problem is over 20-years old, yet many cities are still reluctant to make policy that directly targets them. As a result, mauling after mauling is reported.

About half of all media reports regarding pit bulls involve police officers shooting them. Since the mid 70's pit bulls have been used extensively in criminal operations for drug dealers, gang members and other violent criminals. The pit bull is the dog of choice for criminals. This stems back to their inbred qualities of robust strength, tenaciousness and high pain tolerance.5

Q: Why do people say that pit bulls "don't let go?"
Over years of selective breeding, pit bulls have developed enormous jaw strength. The attribute of "holding on" has been developed too. Such a trait delivers better results in the fighting ring. US courts formally recognize this pit bull characteristic as "hold and shake." When the Colorado Supreme Court upheld the Denver pit bull ban, the high court set aside characteristics that pit bulls displayed when they attack that differ from other breeds. One of them was their bite:

"[pit bulls] inflict more serious wounds than other breeds. They tend to attack the deep muscles, to hold on, to shake, and to cause ripping of tissues. Pit bull attacks were compared to shark attacks."6

Leading pit bull websites encourage responsible owners to use a "break stick" -- a device used to pry the dog's jaws open -- in case their dog accidentally gets into a fight. They also warn that using a break stick on any other breed may cause serious injury to the person. This is because no other dog breed possesses the "hold and shake" trait.7

One of the most powerful examples of a pit bull "not letting go" occurred in a courtroom. During the Toldeo v. Tellings trial, the Lucas County Dog Warden showed a videotape of a tranquilized pit bull hanging from a steel cable. The dog is unconscious and still does not release its grip. At the time of the taping, the animal was being housed at the county shelter.8

Q: Do pit bulls bite more than other dogs?
Depending upon the community in which you live and the ratio of pit bulls within it, yes and no. But whether a pit bull bites more or less than another breed is not the point. The issue is the grave damage a pit bull inflicts when it does bite. The "hold and shake" characteristic of the bite causes severe bone and muscle injury.

When sizing up bite statistics, it is important to understand, What constitutes a bite? A singe bite, recorded and used in bite statistics, is a bite that "breaks the skin." One bite by a poodle that leaves two puncture wounds is recorded the same way as a pit bull attack, which can constitute hundreds of puncture wounds and massive soft tissue loss.9
youre kidding

Columbia, SC

#19 Jul 27, 2009
Q: How come pit bull owners always say, "My dog is a sweetheart?"
To understand the experience of owning a negatively perceived dog, Tufts Center for Animals and Public Policy did a study on pit bull owners. Researchers found that owners of pit bulls directly feel the stigma targeted at their breed and resort to various tactics to lessen it.10

One of the strategies included emphasizing counter-stereotypical behavior. For instance, to offset the popular idea that pit bulls are fierce and predatory, respondents in the study voiced just the opposite: "My dog is the biggest sweetheart in the world."

A related strategy involved emphasizing that behavior, not appearance, expressed their dog's true nature. Such behaviors often involved an overwhelming amount of affection toward people. This strategy is illustrated in the much-repeated phrase: "My dog wouldn't hurt a fly, but she might lick you to death."11
Q: Why does my friend say, "Pit bulls are animal-aggressive not people-aggressive?"
Due to selective breeding practices, pit bulls are highly animal aggressive. They frequently kill other pets and livestock. Pit bull experts warn owners, "Never trust your pit bull not to fight." They also state that under no circumstances should you leave a pit bull and another animal alone together.12

Animal aggression is unacceptable -- too many of our pets suffer injury and death as a result. The behavior also leads to human aggression. A common scenario is the following: A pit bull attacks a leashed dog being walked by its owner. The owner gets seriously injured trying to stop the attack.

News stories flourish about pit bulls breaking free of their property and attacking children and the elderly. These victims did not have pets with them, nor were they provoking the dog before the attack. The categorical denial by the pit bull community that the breed is not people-aggressive only serves to create new victims.
Q: What's the best thing we can do for communities and pit bulls?
The best thing we can do for communities and pit bulls is to limit their ownership and population. Fewer pit bulls means fewer human maulings and pit bull euthanizations. Animal People News reports that in 2007, US shelters killed about 1.4 million dogs; pit bulls and their mixes made up 750,000 of them.13

Most metropolitan animal shelters are plagued with high occupancy rates of pit bulls. Because of behavioral problems and liability costs, shelters won't adopt these dogs out. Instead, they are forced to euthanize them. Many pit bull advocates ignore this injustice, even though they claim to "love" the breed.

Over 250 cities have adopted breed-specific laws to address the pit bull problem. Such measures include mandatory sterilization laws and banning pit bull breeding. The most progressive legislation bans new pit bulls from entering a community at all. In just a few years, these cities see a significant drop in pit bull bites, euthanization rates and abuse.

http://www.dogsbite.org/dangerous-dogs-pitbul...
youre kidding

Columbia, SC

#21 Jul 27, 2009
ok...not sure why that post was replicated. sorry!

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