Arcadia Bank of America robbed Tuesday

Full story: Pasadena Star-News

The Bank of America at 180 N. Santa Anita Ave. was robbed Tuesday afternoon around 4:12 p.m., police officials said.

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Twitter 211Guy

Monrovia, CA

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#1
Aug 17, 2010
 
Shame this broke Arcadia dry spell, two years without a bank robbery,strange this branch always has sharp looking armed security guard.No fear our FBI is hot on the trail of the "Smiley Face Bandit", arrest is imminent, just check the Cyber-Cafes and video joints locally.
---abc

United States

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#2
Aug 17, 2010
 
Bank Of America,You better not be charging US the extra FEES to make up the losses of our money that gets robbed often from your BANKS !
Yo soy macho

Altadena, CA

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#3
Aug 17, 2010
 
Asian perp? Either his massage parlor ( brothel ) got raided or he needs money to fix up his four-cylinder rice-rocket.
Ha Ha

Arcadia, CA

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#4
Aug 17, 2010
 
B of A robs their customers all the time with overdraft fees @$35 a crack for their debit cards. They prey on dumb ass kids just out of high school. Rather than deny the $6 purchase at 7/11, they reap in dough with a nice form letter a week later. Screw B of A. Just glad no one got hurt
---abc

United States

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#5
Aug 17, 2010
 
Ha Ha wrote:
B of A robs their customers all the time with overdraft fees @$35 a crack for their debit cards. They prey on dumb **** kids just out of high school. Rather than deny the $6 purchase at 7/11, they reap in dough with a nice form letter a week later. Screw B of A. Just glad no one got hurt
Bank of America was a bank I really use to trust .But that trust was gone about 6 years ago.And yes you are right, I do feel like they are ROBBING us themselves !
YO SOY MACHO KILLA

San Diego, CA

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#6
Aug 17, 2010
 
AYE PUTO YA PINCHE ROOKA GOT RAPED BY AN ASIAN ESE. PASS THE MOTA HOLMES. CHALE.
mary

United States

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#7
Aug 17, 2010
 
That's Nothing! wow....Our area has been hit with many car thefts and Burglaries. North San Gabriel: Duarte and San Gabriel all the way to Rosemead and Duarte....south down Muscatel to Longden Ave.....Sad.... we need Neighborhood Watch Bad......Help!

Burglary is the unlawful entry of a ‘structure’ to commit a felony or a theft. Burglary is commonly known as a "break in," or, "breaking and entering." A ‘structure’ is usually in reference to physical buildings but not cars. Car break-ins or thefts are considered larcenies.

Burglary does not necessarily translate to damage. It is still considered burglary if someone enters through an unlocked door or window with the intent to commit a felony or theft. This is called ‘non-forcible entry’.

‘Forcible entry’ is when windows and doors are broken or forced; screens, walls or roofs are broken; tools are used; locks are picked, etc. You might also hear about ‘attempted forcible entry,’ which is when a burglar attempts to enter but is frightened off.

Again, the definitions of burglary vary from state to state. Consider contacting a legal advisor or a police officer in your area if you would like to learn more about the legal definitions in your jurisdiction.
----------
Larceny

Larceny is similar to burglary. The major difference between the two is that the perpetrator did not illegally enter a structure by using forcible, non- forcible or attempted forcible entry (with the exception of a motor vehicle.)

All thefts of motor vehicles or from motor vehicles (parts, accessories, personal property) are considered larcenies whether the vehicle was locked or unlocked.

Along with motor vehicle theft, larcenies can include purse snatching, shoplifting, theft of any bicycle, fraud, embezzlement, identity theft, forgery, con games, etc.

You might have heard of ‘grand larceny’. In the U.S., this is usually defined as stealing an amount valued at $200 or more. There is also ‘petit (petty) larceny’, which is a smaller amount stolen.

Again, the definitions and degrees of larceny vary from state to state. Depending on the degree of larceny, the penalties may range from a misdemeanor to a felony. Consider contacting a legal advisor or a police officer in your area if you would like to learn more about the legal definitions in your jurisdiction.

Theft, larceny and loss of personal property may not be covered under certain insurance policies. Be sure to read your policy carefully.

Theft...Legally, theft is often synonymous with larceny. Again, the definitions vary from state to state and jurisdictions. Consider contacting a legal advisor or a police officer in your area if you would like to learn more about the legal definitions in your jurisdiction.

Theft, larceny and loss of personal property may not be covered under certain insurance policies. Be sure to read your policy carefully.

Extortion.......Sometimes viewed under the category of theft or larceny, extortion is when a person forces another person to do something against his will (usually give up money) by threat of violence, property damage, extreme financial hardship or damage to the person's reputation. Blackmail is a type of extortion. Racketeering is also often linked to extortion.

In robbery, the offender steals from the victim by immediate threats and force. In extortion, the victim willingly hands over personal property in order to avoid future damage or violence.
stew Pidass

United States

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#8
Aug 17, 2010
 
Maybe if the Arcadia cops weren't always eating lunch in Pasadena there might be a police car or two in Arcadia to scare away the bank robbers.
Twitter 211Guy

Monrovia, CA

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#9
Aug 17, 2010
 
mary wrote:
That's Nothing! wow....Our area has been hit with many car thefts and Burglaries. North San Gabriel: Duarte and San Gabriel all the way to Rosemead and Duarte....south down Muscatel to Longden Ave.....Sad.... we need Neighborhood Watch Bad......Help!
Burglary is the unlawful entry of a ‘structure’ to commit a felony or a theft. Burglary is commonly known as a "break in," or, "breaking and entering." A ‘structure’ is usually in reference to physical buildings but not cars. Car break-ins or thefts are considered larcenies.
Burglary does not necessarily translate to damage. It is still considered burglary if someone enters through an unlocked door or window with the intent to commit a felony or theft. This is called ‘non-forcible entry’.
‘Forcible entry’ is when windows and doors are broken or forced; screens, walls or roofs are broken; tools are used; locks are picked, etc. You might also hear about ‘attempted forcible entry,’ which is when a burglar attempts to enter but is frightened off.
Again, the definitions of burglary vary from state to state. Consider contacting a legal advisor or a police officer in your area if you would like to learn more about the legal definitions in your jurisdiction.
----------
Larceny
Larceny is similar to burglary. The major difference between the two is that the perpetrator did not illegally enter a structure by using forcible, non- forcible or attempted forcible entry (with the exception of a motor vehicle.)
All thefts of motor vehicles or from motor vehicles (parts, accessories, personal property) are considered larcenies whether the vehicle was locked or unlocked.
Along with motor vehicle theft, larcenies can include purse snatching, shoplifting, theft of any bicycle, fraud, embezzlement, identity theft, forgery, con games, etc.
You might have heard of ‘grand larceny’. In the U.S., this is usually defined as stealing an amount valued at $200 or more. There is also ‘petit (petty) larceny’, which is a smaller amount stolen.
Again, the definitions and degrees of larceny vary from state to state. Depending on the degree of larceny, the penalties may range from a misdemeanor to a felony. Consider contacting a legal advisor or a police officer in your area if you would like to learn more about the legal definitions in your jurisdiction.
Theft, larceny and loss of personal property may not be covered under certain insurance policies. Be sure to read your policy carefully.
Theft...Legally, theft is often synonymous with larceny. Again, the definitions vary from state to state and jurisdictions. Consider contacting a legal advisor or a police officer in your area if you would like to learn more about the legal definitions in your jurisdiction.
Theft, larceny and loss of personal property may not be covered under certain insurance policies. Be sure to read your policy carefully.
Extortion.......Sometimes viewed under the category of theft or larceny, extortion is when a person forces another person to do something against his will (usually give up money) by threat of violence, property damage, extreme financial hardship or damage to the person's reputation. Blackmail is a type of extortion. Racketeering is also often linked to extortion.
In robbery, the offender steals from the victim by immediate threats and force. In extortion, the victim willingly hands over personal property in order to avoid future damage or violence.
Ahh..thanks Mary for the in-put on the bank robbery. Both Temple Sheriff Station and Arcadia PD have excellent Neighborhood Watch Programs, all concerned citizens have to do is call.
Twitter 211Guy

Monrovia, CA

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#10
Aug 17, 2010
 
stew Pidass wrote:
Maybe if the Arcadia cops weren't always eating lunch in Pasadena there might be a police car or two in Arcadia to scare away the bank robbers.
Got it! Eating lunch in Arcadia will scare away bank robbers.
---abc

United States

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#11
Aug 17, 2010
 
stew Pidass wrote:
Maybe if the Arcadia cops weren't always eating lunch in Pasadena there might be a police car or two in Arcadia to scare away the bank robbers.
They don`t come to Pasadena to eat ! They are returning the jerks from Pasadena that committed crimes in Arcadia ! Besides, why would they eat in Pasadena ? In Arcadia they have Wendy`s and Sonic that could serve them a quick meal !
Fabio

Los Angeles, CA

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#12
Aug 17, 2010
 
---abc wrote:
<quoted text>They don`t come to Pasadena to eat ! They are returning the jerks from Pasadena that committed crimes in Arcadia ! Besides, why would they eat in Pasadena ? In Arcadia they have Wendy`s and Sonic that could serve them a quick meal !
Isnt Sonic in Duarte?
----abc

United States

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#13
Aug 18, 2010
 
Fabio wrote:
<quoted text>
Isnt Sonic in Duarte?
You are right ! The PD from Arcadia have better options for their meals towards that area anyways.

Since: Dec 09

Los Angeles, CA

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#14
Aug 18, 2010
 
mary wrote:
That's Nothing! wow....Our area has been hit with many car thefts and Burglaries. North San Gabriel: Duarte and San Gabriel all the way to Rosemead and Duarte....south down Muscatel to Longden Ave.....Sad.... we need Neighborhood Watch Bad......Help!
Burglary is the unlawful entry of a ‘structure’ to commit a felony or a theft. Burglary is commonly known as a "break in," or, "breaking and entering." A ‘structure’ is usually in reference to physical buildings but not cars. Car break-ins or thefts are considered larcenies.
Burglary does not necessarily translate to damage. It is still considered burglary if someone enters through an unlocked door or window with the intent to commit a felony or theft. This is called ‘non-forcible entry’.
‘Forcible entry’ is when windows and doors are broken or forced; screens, walls or roofs are broken; tools are used; locks are picked, etc. You might also hear about ‘attempted forcible entry,’ which is when a burglar attempts to enter but is frightened off.
Again, the definitions of burglary vary from state to state. Consider contacting a legal advisor or a police officer in your area if you would like to learn more about the legal definitions in your jurisdiction.
----------
Larceny
Larceny is similar to burglary. The major difference between the two is that the perpetrator did not illegally enter a structure by using forcible, non- forcible or attempted forcible entry (with the exception of a motor vehicle.)
All thefts of motor vehicles or from motor vehicles (parts, accessories, personal property) are considered larcenies whether the vehicle was locked or unlocked.
Along with motor vehicle theft, larcenies can include purse snatching, shoplifting, theft of any bicycle, fraud, embezzlement, identity theft, forgery, con games, etc.
You might have heard of ‘grand larceny’. In the U.S., this is usually defined as stealing an amount valued at $200 or more. There is also ‘petit (petty) larceny’, which is a smaller amount stolen.
Again, the definitions and degrees of larceny vary from state to state. Depending on the degree of larceny, the penalties may range from a misdemeanor to a felony. Consider contacting a legal advisor or a police officer in your area if you would like to learn more about the legal definitions in your jurisdiction.
Theft, larceny and loss of personal property may not be covered under certain insurance policies. Be sure to read your policy carefully.
Theft...Legally, theft is often synonymous with larceny. Again, the definitions vary from state to state and jurisdictions. Consider contacting a legal advisor or a police officer in your area if you would like to learn more about the legal definitions in your jurisdiction.
Theft, larceny and loss of personal property may not be covered under certain insurance policies. Be sure to read your policy carefully.
Extortion.......Sometimes viewed under the category of theft or larceny, extortion is when a person forces another person to do something against his will (usually give up money) by threat of violence, property damage, extreme financial hardship or damage to the person's reputation. Blackmail is a type of extortion. Racketeering is also often linked to extortion.
In robbery, the offender steals from the victim by immediate threats and force. In extortion, the victim willingly hands over personal property in order to avoid future damage or violence.
Geezus! Thanks Professor Knowitall......
Arcadia theft report

Oxnard, CA

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#15
Aug 18, 2010
 
"Stolen" from my unlocked car: A real (not fake) Rolex, Louis Vuitton, a pile of money,+ a cell phone I didn't want anymore. Please have my insurance check ready soon. I want to go to Bicycle Club play Pai-Gow!
LaFarge

Lyman, SC

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#16
Aug 18, 2010
 
Asian boy big crook. BofA bigger crooks, County Supervisors - biggest crooks.
LaFarge

Lyman, SC

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#17
Aug 18, 2010
 
Aren't Antonovich's boys half Asian? Naw; couldn't be them. They aren't old enough to have learned Dad's tricks. Besides, Dad goes for bigger game.
Yeah Right

Mission Viejo, CA

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#18
Aug 18, 2010
 
mary wrote:
That's Nothing! wow....Our area has been hit with many car thefts and Burglaries. North San Gabriel: Duarte and San Gabriel all the way to Rosemead and Duarte....south down Muscatel to Longden Ave.....Sad.... we need Neighborhood Watch Bad......Help!
Burglary is the unlawful entry of a ‘structure’ to commit a felony or a theft. Burglary is commonly known as a "break in," or, "breaking and entering." A ‘structure’ is usually in reference to physical buildings but not cars. Car break-ins or thefts are considered larcenies.
Burglary does not necessarily translate to damage. It is still considered burglary if someone enters through an unlocked door or window with the intent to commit a felony or theft. This is called ‘non-forcible entry’.
‘Forcible entry’ is when windows and doors are broken or forced; screens, walls or roofs are broken; tools are used; locks are picked, etc. You might also hear about ‘attempted forcible entry,’ which is when a burglar attempts to enter but is frightened off.
Again, the definitions of burglary vary from state to state. Consider contacting a legal advisor or a police officer in your area if you would like to learn more about the legal definitions in your jurisdiction.
----------
Larceny
Larceny is similar to burglary. The major difference between the two is that the perpetrator did not illegally enter a structure by using forcible, non- forcible or attempted forcible entry (with the exception of a motor vehicle.)
All thefts of motor vehicles or from motor vehicles (parts, accessories, personal property) are considered larcenies whether the vehicle was locked or unlocked.
Along with motor vehicle theft, larcenies can include purse snatching, shoplifting, theft of any bicycle, fraud, embezzlement, identity theft, forgery, con games, etc.
You might have heard of ‘grand larceny’. In the U.S., this is usually defined as stealing an amount valued at $200 or more. There is also ‘petit (petty) larceny’, which is a smaller amount stolen.
Again, the definitions and degrees of larceny vary from state to state. Depending on the degree of larceny, the penalties may range from a misdemeanor to a felony. Consider contacting a legal advisor or a police officer in your area if you would like to learn more about the legal definitions in your jurisdiction.
Theft, larceny and loss of personal property may not be covered under certain insurance policies. Be sure to read your policy carefully.
Theft...Legally, theft is often synonymous with larceny. Again, the definitions vary from state to state and jurisdictions. Consider contacting a legal advisor or a police officer in your area if you would like to learn more about the legal definitions in your jurisdiction.
Theft, larceny and loss of personal property may not be covered under certain insurance policies. Be sure to read your policy carefully.
Extortion.......Sometimes viewed under the category of theft or larceny, extortion is when a person forces another person to do something against his will (usually give up money) by threat of violence, property damage, extreme financial hardship or damage to the person's reputation. Blackmail is a type of extortion. Racketeering is also often linked to extortion.
In robbery, the offender steals from the victim by immediate threats and force. In extortion, the victim willingly hands over personal property in order to avoid future damage or violence.
Thanks for this answer. Oh, wait. What was the question?
Yeah Right

Mission Viejo, CA

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#19
Aug 18, 2010
 
An Asian man in Arcadia? That is the description? The po-po should have no trouble finding him.
PubicEnimas

Chicago, IL

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#21
Aug 20, 2010
 
Rollin downhill Arcadia, pretty soon the kids from there will be riding their bicycles to El Monte to ex-cape that crime ridden neighbor hood.

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