Woman arrested for underage drinking ...

Woman arrested for underage drinking after foot chase

There are 56 comments on the Public Opinion story from Nov 4, 2009, titled Woman arrested for underage drinking after foot chase. In it, Public Opinion reports that:

A 20-year-old Souderton woman was charged with underage drinking for the third time after trying to run away from Shippensburg Police Saturday.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Public Opinion.

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mack

Hatfield, PA

#44 Nov 5, 2009
Effington wrote:
<quoted text>

Just look at Canada and Western Europe, where drinking is a social part of every family, and where teenagers learn the importance of knowing your limits and moderation. We don't have that here. Here we have "Never touch alcohol, but when you turn 21, go nuts!"
While supporters of lowering the drinking age argue that doing so would result in less alcohol use on campuses, there is no evidence that there was less campus alcohol use when lower drinking ages were in effect. In fact, in 1984 when the drinking age was 18, only 8 percent of high school seniors had never used alcohol in their lifetime. Today, 28 percent of high school seniors report never having used alcohol in their lifetime. Other proponents of lowering the 21 drinking age also argue that other countries with lower drinking ages have less youth alcohol use. However, research shows the contrary. A study by PIRE Prevention Research Center, entitled “Youth drinking rates and problems: A comparison of European countries and the United States,” showed that European kids drink more often, drink more heavily and get drunk more often than American teens.

Since: May 09

Location hidden

#45 Nov 5, 2009
A nation-wide survey of students at 168 U. S. colleges and universities found that:

* 98% have never been in trouble with a college administrator because of behavior resulting from drinking too much
* 93% have never received a lower grade because of drinking too much
* 93% have never come to class after having had several drinks
* 90% have never damaged property, pulled a false alarm, or engaged in similar inappropriate behavior because of drinking

While headlines typically express alarm over drinking epidemics among collegians, in reality drinking among college students continues to decline as abstaining from alcohol climbs:

* The proportion of college students who abstain from alcohol jumped 58% between 1983 and 1994, according to a series of nation-wide surveys 7
* A 16% increase in college non-drinkers has been found between the periods of 1989-1991 and 1995-1997 by the federally-funded CORE Institute 8
* A recent study by Dr. Henry Wechsler of Harvard University found that the proportion of collegiate abstainers in the U.S. jumped nearly 22% in the four years since his earlier study 9
* The proportion of non-drinkers among college students in the U.S.recently reached a record-breaking all-time high accoring to statistics collected for the National Institute on Drug Abuse by the Institute for Social Research of the University of Michigan. 10 That means that the proportion of students who drink has dropped to an all-time record-breaking low!
* The proportion of first year college students who drink beer has fallen dramatically and recently reached the lowest level in 30 years, according to national annual surveys by UCLA's Higher Education Research Institute. Similar drops were found for wine and distilled spirits.

http://www2.potsdam.edu/hansondj/UnderageDrin...

Please, read the report and realize that when you look at the hard facts without a preconceived bias, and most other studies are conducted by anti-drinking organizations.

I would like to see your sources of information.

I definitely know, for a fact, that more European teens drink than American teens... because they're not sneaking it behind anyones back. Alcohol is part of the social fabric of European nations.

So assuming that Western European youth drink more often then American youth... does that make their society worse off? Is crime higher? Are there more alcohol related deaths?

No. Not at all. Instead, despite the consumption of alcohol, for which the United States is VERY low on the list, you have a nation of people without sticks up their butts and a realistic attitude toward drinking.
Enoughington

Baltimore, MD

#46 Nov 5, 2009
Effington wrote:
A nation-wide survey of students at 168 U. S. colleges and universities found that:
* 98% have never been in trouble with a college administrator because of behavior resulting from drinking too much
* 93% have never received a lower grade because of drinking too much
* 93% have never come to class after having had several drinks
* 90% have never damaged property, pulled a false alarm, or engaged in similar inappropriate behavior because of drinking
While headlines typically express alarm over drinking epidemics among collegians, in reality drinking among college students continues to decline as abstaining from alcohol climbs:
* The proportion of college students who abstain from alcohol jumped 58% between 1983 and 1994, according to a series of nation-wide surveys 7
* A 16% increase in college non-drinkers has been found between the periods of 1989-1991 and 1995-1997 by the federally-funded CORE Institute 8
* A recent study by Dr. Henry Wechsler of Harvard University found that the proportion of collegiate abstainers in the U.S. jumped nearly 22% in the four years since his earlier study 9
* The proportion of non-drinkers among college students in the U.S.recently reached a record-breaking all-time high accoring to statistics collected for the National Institute on Drug Abuse by the Institute for Social Research of the University of Michigan. 10 That means that the proportion of students who drink has dropped to an all-time record-breaking low!
* The proportion of first year college students who drink beer has fallen dramatically and recently reached the lowest level in 30 years, according to national annual surveys by UCLA's Higher Education Research Institute. Similar drops were found for wine and distilled spirits.
http://www2.potsdam.edu/hansondj/UnderageDrin...
Please, read the report and realize that when you look at the hard facts without a preconceived bias, and most other studies are conducted by anti-drinking organizations.
I would like to see your sources of information.
I definitely know, for a fact, that more European teens drink than American teens... because they're not sneaking it behind anyones back. Alcohol is part of the social fabric of European nations.
So assuming that Western European youth drink more often then American youth... does that make their society worse off? Is crime higher? Are there more alcohol related deaths?
No. Not at all. Instead, despite the consumption of alcohol, for which the United States is VERY low on the list, you have a nation of people without sticks up their butts and a realistic attitude toward drinking.
Please move to Europe then, as you seem to be unsatisfied with "a nation of people" with "sticks up their butts".

Since: May 09

Location hidden

#47 Nov 5, 2009
Enoughington wrote:
<quoted text>
Please move to Europe then, as you seem to be unsatisfied with "a nation of people" with "sticks up their butts".
Good one ;)
mack

Hatfield, PA

#48 Nov 5, 2009
Effington wrote:
A nation-wide survey of students at 168 U. S. colleges and universities found that:
* 98% have never been in trouble with a college administrator because of behavior resulting from drinking too much
* 93% have never received a lower grade because of drinking too much
* 93% have never come to class after having had several drinks
* 90% have never damaged property, pulled a false alarm, or engaged in similar inappropriate behavior because of drinking
While headlines typically express alarm over drinking epidemics among collegians, in reality drinking among college students continues to decline as abstaining from alcohol climbs:
* The proportion of college students who abstain from alcohol jumped 58% between 1983 and 1994, according to a series of nation-wide surveys 7
* A 16% increase in college non-drinkers has been found between the periods of 1989-1991 and 1995-1997 by the federally-funded CORE Institute 8
* A recent study by Dr. Henry Wechsler of Harvard University found that the proportion of collegiate abstainers in the U.S. jumped nearly 22% in the four years since his earlier study 9
* The proportion of non-drinkers among college students in the U.S.recently reached a record-breaking all-time high accoring to statistics collected for the National Institute on Drug Abuse by the Institute for Social Research of the University of Michigan. 10 That means that the proportion of students who drink has dropped to an all-time record-breaking low!
* The proportion of first year college students who drink beer has fallen dramatically and recently reached the lowest level in 30 years, according to national annual surveys by UCLA's Higher Education Research Institute. Similar drops were found for wine and distilled spirits.
http://www2.potsdam.edu/hansondj/UnderageDrin...
Please, read the report and realize that when you look at the hard facts without a preconceived bias, and most other studies are conducted by anti-drinking organizations.
I would like to see your sources of information.
I definitely know, for a fact, that more European teens drink than American teens... because they're not sneaking it behind anyones back. Alcohol is part of the social fabric of European nations.
So assuming that Western European youth drink more often then American youth... does that make their society worse off? Is crime higher? Are there more alcohol related deaths?
No. Not at all. Instead, despite the consumption of alcohol, for which the United States is VERY low on the list, you have a nation of people without sticks up their butts and a realistic attitude toward drinking.
And your point is? When was the legal drinking age raised uniformly to 21? Wow, 1984, twenty five years ago. Do you think maybe the decreases are directly related to that? What age does a person typically start college? Seventeen/eighteen? If they can not legally drink until they are 21, then don't you think that may have something to do with a decrease in alcohol consumption in college?
Looks like a no-brainer to me.

As far as youth drinking in Europe and related problems, there's too much to even post here. Looks like you must have made your statement without doing any research. Do you think it's okay for European teens to be drinking MORE than American teens? Do you think teen drinking is a GOOD thing? That's what it looks like you're saying. Do some research on alcohol related problems with European teens and you'll find there ARE problems. If Europeans don't think drinking among teens is a problem, then why are they looking at US policies to help them handle teen drinking in their countries?

You conveniently ignored the statistics on the effects of alcohol consumption on the brains of teens and the statistics on alcohol related driving fatalities among the under 21 crowd.
mack

Hatfield, PA

#49 Nov 5, 2009
Effington wrote:
A nation-wide survey of students at 168 U. S. colleges and universities found that:
* 98% have never been in trouble with a college administrator because of behavior resulting from drinking too much
* 93% have never received a lower grade because of drinking too much
* 93% have never come to class after having had several drinks
* 90% have never damaged property, pulled a false alarm, or engaged in similar inappropriate behavior because of drinking
While headlines typically express alarm over drinking epidemics among collegians, in reality drinking among college students continues to decline as abstaining from alcohol climbs:
* The proportion of college students who abstain from alcohol jumped 58% between 1983 and 1994, according to a series of nation-wide surveys 7
* A 16% increase in college non-drinkers has been found between the periods of 1989-1991 and 1995-1997 by the federally-funded CORE Institute 8
* A recent study by Dr. Henry Wechsler of Harvard University found that the proportion of collegiate abstainers in the U.S. jumped nearly 22% in the four years since his earlier study 9
* The proportion of non-drinkers among college students in the U.S.recently reached a record-breaking all-time high accoring to statistics collected for the National Institute on Drug Abuse by the Institute for Social Research of the University of Michigan. 10 That means that the proportion of students who drink has dropped to an all-time record-breaking low!
* The proportion of first year college students who drink beer has fallen dramatically and recently reached the lowest level in 30 years, according to national annual surveys by UCLA's Higher Education Research Institute. Similar drops were found for wine and distilled spirits.
http://www2.potsdam.edu/hansondj/UnderageDrin...
Please, read the report and realize that when you look at the hard facts without a preconceived bias, and most other studies are conducted by anti-drinking organizations.
.
I wrote in post # 44:
mack wrote:
<quoted text>
While supporters of lowering the drinking age argue that doing so would result in less alcohol use on campuses, there is no evidence that there was less campus alcohol use when lower drinking ages were in effect. In fact, in 1984 when the drinking age was 18, only 8 percent of high school seniors had NEVER used alcohol in their lifetime. Today, 28 percent of high school seniors report NEVER having used alcohol in their lifetime.
Did you actually read this before you posted about drinking decreasing? I think you were trying to post a rebuttal to my post, yet your post just verified what I'd already written.
Grn Twp Res

Hillsborough, NJ

#50 Nov 5, 2009
Effington wrote:
<quoted text>
How can lowering the minimum drinking age to 18 or 19 cause an average increase in crashed 8-10 percent if it's never been lowered?
I'd love to read this story. Go ahead, post a link... Google came up with zilch.
Bravo indeed.
It was previously 18 to drink and that obviously didn't work too well otherwise they wouldn't have raised it to 21.
disagree

Philadelphia, PA

#51 Nov 6, 2009
Sosad wrote:
<quoted text>
Su has a program, 3 strikes and you are out. No more classes at SU for sure.
But is it her third strike at SU? This young lady has quite a history since she turned 16, starting with disorderly conduct. At 17, she was nailed for underage drinking. More disorderly charges at 18 and 19 and, prior to the latest drunken run, retail theft. Her fines have cost her or her family over $2000 in 4 years. She has a serious problem and should be in rehab instead of a college classroom. A higher education is not keeping her out of trouble and a degree won't do her a lot of good if she's behind bars. With her record, it's going to be tough for her to get a job anywhere. I don't have any idea what her major is unless it's drinking with a minor in partying. I wonder if she knows how to say, "Do you want fries with that?".
Rob

Wilmington, DE

#52 Nov 6, 2009
Effington wrote:
I say we need to spend a little less time chasing 20-year-old adults around because they had a couple drinks, and start actually caring about protecting our communities.
Marine Mom, you have no clue. These students are going to drink in college whether you like it or not, and regardless of what the law says. This is why restricting legal adults from drinking is archaic and counterproductive.
So this idiot keeps getting caught; does she deserve to have this follow her for the rest of her life?
We just elected Dave Plum to magisterial judge, and he was arrest for DUI and soliciting a prostitute. He got a slap on the wrist when he got caught, and now he's a judge.
This girl, however, had a few drinks with friends in college and now has to have this hanging over her head forever.
This is a sad, pathetic society people. The law isn't preventing anything, but it seems to be keeping our cops in shape. How much domestic violence went unchecked because of this little footrace?
I definitely won't be crying when a drunken 20 year old crashes into you and kills you, only to be slapped with another DUI and a 1 year stint for vehicular manslaughter. I'll laugh at the irony instead.

At least that would get rid of one idiot permanently.

I've lost a couple friends & relatives to alcohol and for you to make an ignorant statement like that, it really pisses me off. Also, you berate a cop for doing his job when the offender was in FRONT of him...do you want our country to be lawless also?

Go get a clue, you f'ing idiot.

Since: May 09

Location hidden

#53 Nov 6, 2009
Rob wrote:
<quoted text>
I definitely won't be crying when a drunken 20 year old crashes into you and kills you, only to be slapped with another DUI and a 1 year stint for vehicular manslaughter. I'll laugh at the irony instead.
At least that would get rid of one idiot permanently.
I've lost a couple friends & relatives to alcohol and for you to make an ignorant statement like that, it really pisses me off. Also, you berate a cop for doing his job when the offender was in FRONT of him...do you want our country to be lawless also?
Go get a clue, you ****'ing idiot.
Real mature Rob, becuase obviously only 20 year olds drink and drive, right?

Age has nothing to do with it. There's been a lengthy discussion about this and you're commenting on one post. Go, take your head out of your butt, read the rest of the discussion and then come back here and call me names. Tough guy.

Since: May 09

Location hidden

#54 Nov 6, 2009
Why We Should Lower the Drinking Age to 19

by Gene Ford

Age 21 minimum drinking laws are counter-productive. There is much evidence that reducing the drinking age to 19 would reduce the abuse of alcohol among young people.

The U.S. has the strictest youth drinking laws in western civilization and yet has the most drinking-related problems among its young. And there seems to be a connection between these two facts.

When I was a teen in the 1930s my peers drank to physical and mental oblivion on weekends to demonstrate their "manhood," and, to a lesser degree, their "womanhood." Alcohol abuse had received new energy as a result of Prohibition. The harvest of forbidden fruit was bitter and disastrous.

Today, irrefutable scientific evidence supports the fact that the early introduction of drinking is the safest way to reduce juvenile alcohol abuse. Young people in France, Spain, and Argentina rarely abuse alcohol. They learn how to drink within the family, which sees drinking in moderation as natural and normal. Youth in these societies rarely embarrass themselves or their families by abusing alcohol. In Portugal and New Zealand there are no minimum drinking age requirements. In Belgium, most of Canada, Italy, and Spain, young people of sixteen years may consume in restaurants when with parents or another adult. Australia and South Africa have an 18-year minimum.

Researchers have pointed out that minimum drinking age laws in the U.S. are a post-Prohibition phenomenon. Prior to the repeal of the Eighteenth amendment (Prohibition), state laws prohibiting minors from possession or use of alcohol were unusual. Adolescent alcohol consumption was regulated by the informal controls of family, community, peers, and self-restraint. The only drinking controls that have enjoyed any success over the centuries are social and cultural constraints.

I continue to witness the fundamental goodness of our young people and their capacity to be truly adult in their behavior, when given the chance. Despite the dissolution of the nuclear family, the vast majority of young people in America are well-intentioned and upright citizens. The twisted logic of youthful minimum drinking age laws denies them that basic respect. Research has found that restricting access to alcohol doesn¹t lower its consumption among young people. It just drives it "underground" into undesirable locations that aren't subject to the moderating influence of adults. In short, such efforts are counterproductive.

No one seriously contends that alcohol beverages should be free of societal controls. The question isn't whether there should be controls, but which controls work best. What has proven around the world to work best is a combination of reasonable laws backed by strong social sanctions. But in the U.S. we treat our emerging adults as infants and get infantile behavior as a result.

If adults would learn to temper their patronizing attitudes toward young men and women, more maturity, self-restraint, and social responsibility could be expected of them. Lowering the drinking age to 19 would do much to reduce the youthful abuse of alcohol.

___

Gene Ford is the founder and publisher, emeritus, of Healthy Drinking magazine and the author of five books about drinking, including The French Paradox and Drinking For Health, which is an extensively documented analysis of drinking in terms of health and control issues. He is currently completing another book on the health benefits of moderate consumption of alcohol beverages.
fake id

Carlisle, PA

#55 Nov 6, 2009
Effington wrote:
Why We Should Lower the Drinking Age to 19
by Gene Ford
Age 21 minimum drinking laws are counter-productive. There is much evidence that reducing the drinking age to 19 would reduce the abuse of alcohol among young people.
The U.S. has the strictest youth drinking laws in western civilization and yet has the most drinking-related problems among its young. And there seems to be a connection between these two facts.
When I was a teen in the 1930s my peers drank to physical and mental oblivion on weekends to demonstrate their "manhood," and, to a lesser degree, their "womanhood." Alcohol abuse had received new energy as a result of Prohibition. The harvest of forbidden fruit was bitter and disastrous.
Today, irrefutable scientific evidence supports the fact that the early introduction of drinking is the safest way to reduce juvenile alcohol abuse. Young people in France, Spain, and Argentina rarely abuse alcohol. They learn how to drink within the family, which sees drinking in moderation as natural and normal. Youth in these societies rarely embarrass themselves or their families by abusing alcohol. In Portugal and New Zealand there are no minimum drinking age requirements. In Belgium, most of Canada, Italy, and Spain, young people of sixteen years may consume in restaurants when with parents or another adult. Australia and South Africa have an 18-year minimum.
Researchers have pointed out that minimum drinking age laws in the U.S. are a post-Prohibition phenomenon. Prior to the repeal of the Eighteenth amendment (Prohibition), state laws prohibiting minors from possession or use of alcohol were unusual. Adolescent alcohol consumption was regulated by the informal controls of family, community, peers, and self-restraint. The only drinking controls that have enjoyed any success over the centuries are social and cultural constraints.
I continue to witness the fundamental goodness of our young people and their capacity to be truly adult in their behavior, when given the chance. Despite the dissolution of the nuclear family, the vast majority of young people in America are well-intentioned and upright citizens..........
No one seriously contends that alcohol beverages should be free of societal controls. The question isn't whether there should be controls, but which controls work best. What has proven around the world to work best is a combination of reasonable laws backed by strong social sanctions. But in the U.S. we treat our emerging adults as infants and get infantile behavior as a result.
If adults would learn to temper their patronizing attitudes toward young men and women, more maturity, self-restraint, and social responsibility could be expected of them. Lowering the drinking age to 19 would do much to reduce the youthful abuse of alcohol.
___
Gene Ford is the founder and publisher, emeritus, of Healthy Drinking magazine and the author of five books about drinking, including The French Paradox and Drinking For Health, which is an extensively documented analysis of drinking in terms of health and control issues. He is currently completing another book on the health benefits of moderate consumption of alcohol beverages.
I sort of think you have a good point; however, what is the research of how strict the penalties are in those countries you have stated if one does drive DUI, get public drunk, fight, get obnoxious, etc. Some countries shove a glass stiring rod in a man's you know what and smashes it with a hammer if they rape a female, some countries cut off fingers for stealing, some countries invoke physical pain for selling drugs... Do the countries that you state have severe penalties... If so maybe the US/PA needs to invoke harsher DUI laws and spread the word with many TV ads
mack

Lansdale, PA

#56 Nov 6, 2009
Effington wrote:
Why We Should Lower the Drinking Age to 19
by Gene Ford

The U.S. has the strictest youth drinking laws in western civilization and yet has the most drinking-related problems among its young. And there seems to be a connection between these two facts.
When I was a teen in the 1930s my peers drank to physical and mental oblivion on weekends to demonstrate their "manhood," and, to a lesser degree, their "womanhood." Alcohol abuse had received new energy as a result of Prohibition. The harvest of forbidden fruit was bitter and disastrous.
Today, irrefutable scientific evidence supports the fact that the early introduction of drinking is the safest way to reduce juvenile alcohol abuse. Young people in France, Spain, and Argentina rarely abuse alcohol. They learn how to drink within the family, which sees drinking in moderation as natural and normal. Youth in these societies rarely embarrass themselves or their families by abusing alcohol. In Portugal and New Zealand there are no minimum drinking age requirements. In Belgium, most of Canada, Italy, and Spain, young people of sixteen years may consume in restaurants when with parents or another adult. Australia and South Africa have an 18-year minimum.
This is an OPINION piece, where is his evidence and statistics?

He is talking about sensible drinking and health and moderation, it has nothing to do with the effects of alcohol on a young person's brain. Teenagers have not developed the cognitive, social, and psychological mechanisms that are needed to make thoughtful and logical decisions about alcohol use; in addition, their bodies have not finished their physical maturation process. What about the number of fatalities caused by underaged alcohol consumption? I'm not sure how he missed that research.

He was a teen in the 1930's. Can he really compare the teen of the 1930's to a teen in 2009? I can't even compare my life as a teen in the early 70's with the life my kids had as teens just recently.

As far as alcohol abuse in other countries, he is inaccurate on that point.

Bulletin of the World Health Organization
Print version ISSN 0042-9686
WHO News
Alcohol takes its toll on Europe’s youth.
Whether it is drinks or drugs — getting high seems to be increasingly popular among European teenagers. In most European countries, today’s 16-year-olds consume more alcohol, cannabis and other drugs than ever. And they’re paying a price. Alcohol is to blame for one in four deaths of young European men aged 15 to 29. These bleak findings were presented in late February at the European Ministerial Conference on Young People and Alcohol in Stockholm, where WHO and the Swedish government had convened European health ministers, other high-ranking decision-makers and young citizens from 51 European countries to discuss the impact of alcohol and drugs on the health of Europe’s coming generations — and to sketch out a region-wide action plan to keep them‘‘safe and dry.’’

Why are you so intent on lowering the drinking age? Does it affect you personally?

“Not fallen”

Since: May 08

WalMartBoro, PA

#57 Nov 6, 2009
Sounds like ol' Gene's an alcoholic who couldn't get sober. Plenty of them on the bookshelves. Any 'good' alcoholic is an effective mental-mastur-debater. Anyone who spends that much time writing about drinking has gone to great lengths to support their own dishonesty. Normal drinkers don't even talk about drinking, much less write books about it.

Good ol' Gene. Mr. terminally unique.
Irishiz

Lansdale, PA

#58 Nov 12, 2009
Lived in Ireland & England.Drinking age 18, There was much more drinking going on there in general. It was not uncommon to see teens & adults totally trashed on the street. Happy to say in the USA this is looked down upon. What children observe in the home is key & attitudes towards alcohol.
I do believe however that the driving age should be raised,driving @ 16 gives teens too much freedom before they are mature enough to deal with it. Driving age was 18 when I lived there.
mack

Lansdale, PA

#59 Nov 12, 2009
Irishiz wrote:
Lived in Ireland & England.Drinking age 18, There was much more drinking going on there in general. It was not uncommon to see teens & adults totally trashed on the street. Happy to say in the USA this is looked down upon. What children observe in the home is key & attitudes towards alcohol.
I do believe however that the driving age should be raised,driving @ 16 gives teens too much freedom before they are mature enough to deal with it. Driving age was 18 when I lived there.
My kids knew, long before they were 16, that they would not get their license until they were at least 17. My oldest, the "wild child" didn't get his permit until he was 16 1/2. He stayed on that, until a month before his 18th birthday. Even with that, he got his first speeding ticket within a month..LOL He's now 25 and has gotten many citations, but fortunately no accidents. My daughter got her license just after turning 17. So far, at 22, no citations, no accidents. My youngest, got his license at 17 1/2. He's now 20 and has gotten one citation for a rolling stop, but no accidents. So even though the age is 16 1/2 to get a license here, the parents are the ones that ultimately have to decide when they are ready and not allow them to go for the license before then (up to age 18). But, it would make it easier if the law just set the age higher.

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