Is the SCPD effectively ousting Meth ...

Is the SCPD effectively ousting Meth from our neighborhoods?

Created by Robot Logic on Aug 14, 2010

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curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#2 Aug 15, 2010
READ THIS REPORT ABOUT HOW METH IS A UNIQUE THREAT TO LAW ENFORCEMENT. lots of great info (although a little dated).

http://www.hidta.org/programs/docs/040922_Met...

for instance: "90% of all domestic violence calls are a direct result of meth use."
Robot Logic

Santa Cruz, CA

#3 Aug 15, 2010
Robot Logic says Methamphetamine is too addictive 'n difficult habit to kick.

http://www.kci.org/meth_info/faq_meth.htm

Q: Why is methamphetamine addictive?
A. All addictive drugs have two things in common: they produce an initial pleasurable effect, followed by a rebound unpleasant effect. Methamphetamine, through its stimulant effects, produces a positive feeling, but later leaves a person feeling depressed. This is because it suppresses the normal production of dopamine, creating a chemical imbalance. The user physically demands more of the drug to return to normal. This pleasure/tension cycle leads to loss of control over the drug and addiction.

Q: How does methamphetamine take over one's life?
A. Methamphetamine short-circuits a person's survival system by artificially stimulating the reward center, or pleasure areas in the brain. This leads to increased confidence in meth and less confidence in the normal rewards of life. This happens on a physical level at first, then it affects the user psychologically. The result is decreased interest in other aspects of life while reliance and interest in meth increases. In one study, laboratory animals pressed levers to release methamphetamine into their blood stream rather than eat, mate, or satisfy other natural drives. The animals died of starvation while giving themselves methamphetamine even though food was available.

Q: Is there methamphetamine withdrawal?
A. Yes. The severity and length of symptoms vary with the amount of damage done to the normal reward system through methamphetamine use. The most common symptoms are: drug craving, extreme irritability, loss of energy, depression, fearfulness, excessive drowsiness or difficulty in sleeping, shaking, nausea, palpitations, sweating, hyperventilation, and increased appetite. See also: Quitting Crystal Meth / Methamphetamine

Q: Is methamphetamine addiction difficult to treat?
A. Several treatment providers describe methamphetamine abusers as "the hardest to treat" of all drug users. They are often overly excitable and "extremely resistant to any form of intervention once the acute effects of meth use have gone away." Meth addicts get over the acute effects of withdrawal fairly quickly. However, the "wall" period lasts 6-8 months for casual users and 2-3 years for regular users.(Some people never recover and remain unsatisfied with life dueto permanent brain damage.) This is a period of prolonged abstinence during which the brain recovers from the changes resulting from meth use. During this period, recovering addicts feel depressed, fuzzyheaded, and think life isn't as pleasurable without the drug. Because prolonged use causes changes in the brain, willpower alone will not cure meth addicts.

Q: Is relapse common?
A. Yes. Because there are psychiatric, social, and biological components to meth dependence, there is a high likelihood of relapse. Key relapse issues are similar to that of cocaine use and include other substance abuse and being around drug-using friends.
rita

Santa Cruz, CA

#4 Aug 15, 2010
curious cat wrote:
READ THIS REPORT ABOUT HOW METH IS A UNIQUE THREAT TO LAW ENFORCEMENT. lots of great info (although a little dated).
http://www.hidta.org/programs/docs/040922_Met...
for instance: "90% of all domestic violence calls are a direct result of meth use."
law enforcement personnell hsve been doing meth for years, considering it the shift worker's helper. One of resons it hs gotten such foothold in our society.
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#5 Aug 15, 2010
rita wrote:
<quoted text>
law enforcement personnell hsve been doing meth for years, considering it the shift worker's helper. One of resons it hs gotten such foothold in our society.
curiously that thought entered my head last night, but i believed uttering it would get me flamed. thanx for your courage.
Pat Kittle

Santa Cruz, CA

#7 Aug 15, 2010
curious cat wrote:
READ THIS REPORT ABOUT HOW METH IS A UNIQUE THREAT TO LAW ENFORCEMENT. lots of great info (although a little dated).
http://www.hidta.org/programs/docs/040922_Met...
for instance: "90% of all domestic violence calls are a direct result of meth use."
Hypocrite,

Your support of open borders makes our meth problem even worse.
Pat Kittle

Santa Cruz, CA

#8 Aug 15, 2010
rita wrote:
<quoted text>
law enforcement personnell hsve been doing meth for years, considering it the shift worker's helper. One of resons it hs gotten such foothold in our society.
Is that your idea of a joke, or do you have some proof?
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#9 Aug 15, 2010
Pat Kittle wrote:
<quoted text>
Hypocrite,
Your support of open borders makes our meth problem even worse.
All the meth addicts and their drug connections I've seen are WHITE. And I have seen plenty. The meth problem in SC is a WHITE problem.

Why are you pulling in your crazy obsession with latinos into it? Or do you purposely pull things off topic to stifle open, intelligent discussion. Why are you against open, intelligent, honest discussion?
rita

Santa Cruz, CA

#11 Aug 15, 2010
Pat Kittle wrote:
<quoted text>
Is that your idea of a joke, or do you have some proof?
No, Pat, it is not a joke. Even though I m a native, I spent almost 3 decades living ll over the country, from rural to urban settings. Also have done some shift work. he "American way" of bigger and stronger is better" mindset had brought us to meth. Just as those who have one drink or cigarette don't think they willo ever be addicts, this mentality spills over into other drugs. "I just need some help to get through finals", "The kids had parent teacher conferences and I still have to work tonight, no time to sleep", and the excuses go on. Have even spoken with some law enforcement people who would put "helper" drug into a rationalized category (as do most addicts). As for stats, a quick search only showed reported problems with steroids among law enforcement. However, considering the power they weld no surprise that information is not easy to access, much like the fact nixon was on thorazine while president.
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#12 Aug 16, 2010
definitely NOT saying SCPD officers do this. just that police officers like everyone else is not immune to the addictive effects of meth.

http://www.roanoke.com/news/breaking/wb/25308...

to quote:

"Ex-cop in Pulaski, Radford admits using and dealing methamphetamine in uniform

By Mike Gangloff | The Roanoke Times

An ex-police officer who worked in Pulaski and Radford pleaded guilty today to federal charges he sold and used methamphetamine in his patrol car while in uniform and on duty.

Christopher Franklin Bond, 32, a two-year police veteran of Pulaski's force who quit in June 2009 after he was charged with possessing and trying to buy meth in Wythe and Carroll counties, admitted in U.S. District Court in Roanoke to conspiring to distribute more than 50 grams of methamphetamine. Bond, free on $10,000 bail, faces 5 to 40 years imprisonment under federal guidelines when he is sentenced Oct. 4.

Bond, who was a Radford officer in 2006 before he was hired in Pulaski, smoked dope in his patrol car with fellow users and at the homes of other meth users while in uniform, according to a summary of the case that Assistant U.S. Attorney Charlene Day presented in court. She said he arrived dealer's homes in his patrol car, went inside in uniform with his service pistol, then sat down to take drugs before buying meth and marijuana.

Bond was involved with drugs while working in both the Radford and Pulaski police departments, Day said.

"I don't even know where to start," Bond said in court today. "I feel like I'm a good person who got caught up in a bad situation. I started to use methamphetamine and it got out of control ... I did not sell this for profit. I sold it so the person who was selling to me would use with me."
Pat Kittle

Santa Cruz, CA

#13 Aug 16, 2010
rita wrote:
<quoted text>
No, Pat, it is not a joke. Even though I m a native, I spent almost 3 decades living ll over the country, from rural to urban settings. Also have done some shift work. he "American way" of bigger and stronger is better" mindset had brought us to meth. Just as those who have one drink or cigarette don't think they willo ever be addicts, this mentality spills over into other drugs. "I just need some help to get through finals", "The kids had parent teacher conferences and I still have to work tonight, no time to sleep", and the excuses go on. Have even spoken with some law enforcement people who would put "helper" drug into a rationalized category (as do most addicts). As for stats, a quick search only showed reported problems with steroids among law enforcement. However, considering the power they weld no surprise that information is not easy to access, much like the fact nixon was on thorazine while president.
So do you have first-hand evidence of your alleged cops-on-meth accusation? I'm just asking.

But you're right -- we should have full disclosure of police perfermance.

Just as we should have full disclosure of immigration status of suspected illegals. And police should be able to make that determination.

There's too much secrecy in both cases.
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#16 Aug 16, 2010
Pat Kittle wrote:
<quoted text>
And I'm sure your creditials are impeccable.
:-)
thanx. i have impeccable credentials. ask UCSC.
meth madness continues

Santa Cruz, CA

#17 Aug 16, 2010
we need to bring this SWAT TEAM to SC -- we can give them directions ...

http://www.trutv.com/video/secret-ops/buck-up...
rita

Santa Cruz, CA

#18 Aug 16, 2010
Wht would you like, continul presence of National Guard, patroling the streets, 24/7, to assure perfect order. Be careful what you ask for.
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#19 Aug 16, 2010
rita wrote:
Wht would you like, continul presence of National Guard, patroling the streets, 24/7, to assure perfect order. Be careful what you ask for.
yeah. those SWATTERs -- probably from a Southern state -- seemed pretty rough n ready. still, i think the SCPD is not as active as they should be on the Meth front. just like the gang problem outed by Carl Reimer's murder, they are behind the curve on Meth too.
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#20 Aug 17, 2010
does SCPD publish stats which would show their success rate on meth busts + how many and what kind they have been making for the last 10 years?
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#23 Aug 18, 2010
this one pot Meth cooking is worrying law enforcement in other states. i wonder how many one pot Meth cookers we have in our Santa Cruz neighborhoods? how will the SCPD catch them?

http://www.arkansas.gov/senate/newsroom/index...

to quote:

"LITTLE ROCK - In large part because of the growing use of "one pot" cooking, the number of meth lab busts in Arkansas has started to climb again.

The frequency of meth labs that were broken up by Arkansas law enforcement agencies dropped greatly after passage of Act 256 of 2005. The law requires consumers to show an ID before they can buy certain cold medications that are used in the manufacture of methamphetamine.

However, law enforcement authorities are concerned that "one pot" cooking allows meth manufacturers to more easily skirt the restrictions in Act 256. Methamphetamine is an extremely addictive form of speed made from household chemicals that can be purchased legally, such as lawn fertilizer, batteries and lye or drain cleaner. One of the ingredients, pseudoephedrine, is found in common cold medications.

The consumer's name goes into a computer data base so law enforcement authorities can track suspicious purchases, such as a person going all over town buying up the maximum allowable quantity of cold medication. Act 256 was modeled after an Oklahoma law, where authorities reported an 80 percent reduction in the number of meth labs they broke up. However, "one pot" cooking has caused an increase in meth busts in Oklahoma in the past two years.

In Arkansas, after passage of Act 256 the number of meth lab busts went down from more than 1,200 in 2004 to a low of 375 in 2007. However, in 2008 the number of busts went up to 418 and in 2009 up to 668. The total for 2009 may actually be greater because some cases are still not final, and thus have not been counted yet.

Law officers throughout the United States began noticing the rise of "one pot" labs in 2008. In Arkansas, as in many other states, the majority of meth labs discovered are now "one pot" labs.

After Act 256 took effect, police agencies began to see a shift in the source of meth. Instead of cooking it themselves, more addicts began buying a form called "ice" that was made in Mexico or in western states. It was relatively pure, often as much as 80 percent pure.

Arkansas meth users shifted back to cooking it themselves for a couple of reasons. The Mexican "ice" is much less pure these days, about 30 percent, whereas "one pot" cooking produces a very pure form of the drug. It also is called the "shake and bake" method. The meth is produced in a 20-ounce or two-liter soda bottle.

The prevalence of "one pot" labs is that more manufacturers are now cooking meth in moving vehicles and throwing the trash, and the evidence, out the window. Some police officers refer to them as "trash labs."

There is a greater risk of fire with the "one pot" method. According to news reports, there were 16 fires caused by meth labs in Tulsa last year, as well as at least 18 cases of people dying from an overdose of meth. In 2005 Oregon was the first state to require a doctor's prescription to buy cold and allergy medications containing pseudoephedrine. Although consumers complained of the inconvenience, the law was a factor in the reduction of meth lab busts in Oregon to only 10 last year."
Robot Logic

Santa Cruz, CA

#24 Aug 18, 2010
"Crystal meth makes you crazy

After 17 months in jail, world renowned cancer researcher, professor and meth addict/dealer Marcello Arsura couldn’t have said it better. Mr. Asura was sentenced to 35 months in prison for drug dealing while working for The University of Tennessee Health Science Center as a pharmacologist.
“I do really feel like a fool,” he said.“I had everything to lose and I chose to lose it.”

This was a man respected and looked up to by so many and he managed to lead a double life. As a degreed professor in the pharmaceutical field, he fully knew the effects of the drug that he ingested several times daily, yet crystal meth had a grip so tight on him that he threw all reasoning aside. It was only after 17 months in jail awaiting sentencing for drug trafficking and possession that he was able to reflect logically on his experience. Looking back at the arrest video he sees a man violently kicking and screaming trying to break the arresting officer’s grasp. Today he doesn’t even recognize that man.
“Crystal meth makes you crazy,” Arsura said, shaking his head.“It obliterated my ability to objectively assess my behavior. I did things I didn’t think I did. It was like I had out-of-body experiences.”

Aside from being sentenced to 35 months in prison, he was also ordered to write an essay on his experiences with illegal drugs and untreated depression. He also says he would like to re-enter the world of research; possibly studying the effects of meth on the human brain.
My hope is that a man with his knowledge and now real-world experience can turn this experience into something good. I truly believe these things happen for a reason and Mr. Arsura now has first hand experience with crystal meth that could potentially prove invaluable in the research world.

You can read the full story http://www.commercialappeal.com/news/2007/oct...
Robot Logic

Santa Cruz, CA

#25 Aug 18, 2010
Hot Meth Addict Throws a Fit

http://www.break.com/usercontent/2007/11/Hot-...

I wonder who my meth tweeking neighbors think they are? God?
meth madness continues

Santa Cruz, CA

#28 Aug 19, 2010
Walt tutors meth cooker in hardware store. there are TV shows about Meth cookers now:

Soquel Local

Salinas, CA

#29 Aug 19, 2010
Not as long as you have the perfect combination of Sureno gang members living in Section 8 housing selling meth to the legions of drug addicted transients attracted to Santa Cruz by the holly enablers at the Coral St Shelter. Close the shelter, evict the gang members AND their families from the subsidized (by taxpayers) housing and you will start to make a dent.

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