Should the City Council declare Santa Cruz a METH FREE ZONE?

Created by curious cat on Aug 11, 2010

201 votes

Click on an option to vote

yes

no

prosecute meth tweakers, dealers and cookers

i like meth

i hate meth

fire the City Council

legalize meth

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curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#1 Aug 11, 2010
so far 4 people have voted to "legalize meth" and 2 have voted that they "like meth". to educate me and others, why did you vote this way?
JJJ

Santa Cruz, CA

#2 Aug 12, 2010
why are choices 1 3 and 5 not mutally exclusive, yet you can only pick one of them?
this looks like it was done by tweakers who couldn't count past 3.
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#3 Aug 12, 2010
JJJ wrote:
why are choices 1 3 and 5 not mutally exclusive, yet you can only pick one of them?
this looks like it was done by tweakers who couldn't count past 3.
that's how Sentinel forum polls work. they don't allow multiple choices. if you have complaints about how Sentinel online polling software works, i recommend calling Tom Moore, the online editor for the Sentinel newspaper -- he is very helpful.

here is the directory information to call him: http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/contactus

thank you for your comment (on how Sentinel polling software works).
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#4 Aug 12, 2010
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#5 Aug 12, 2010
faces of meth video, very sad:

curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#6 Aug 13, 2010
How easy it is to cook meth, very disturbing:

curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#7 Aug 13, 2010
"dedicated, resourceful and addicted to Meth". "a group bound by one thing, Meth addiction". Meth and ID theft -- the "Wheaton Bandit". this is totally whack. you have to watch this!

http://www.hulu.com/watch/80719/american-gree...
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#8 Aug 13, 2010
"You and your Crystal Meth" by the Drive-By Truckers:

curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#9 Aug 13, 2010
can some of the people who voted to legalize meth help this student on his school paper to find arguments for legalizing meth (and tell us too)?

to quote:

"I'm writing a paper for a class where the teacher is hardcore against drugs. She gave me a paper to write about meth and I feel it should be legal but want to present a good argument. Anybody know where I can get some information or am I alone on this."

http://www.facebook.com/note.php...
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#10 Aug 13, 2010
watch this video series by PBS Frontline:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/meth/...

to quote the description:

"Speed. Meth. Glass. On the street, methamphetamine has many names. What started as a fad among West Coast motorcycle gangs in the 1970s has spread across the United States, and despite lawmakers' calls for action, the drug is now more potent, and more destructive, than at any time in the past decade. In "The Meth Epidemic," FRONTLINE, in association with The Oregonian, investigates the meth rampage in America: the appalling impact on individuals, families and communities, and the difficulty of controlling an essential ingredient in meth—ephedrine and pseudoephedrine—sold legally in over-the-counter cold remedies.

In Congress, a bipartisan coalition has called for international controls on ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, either of which is essential for making meth. Many states [see map] have forced cold medicines containing these ingredients off retail shelves and behind the pharmacy counter -- a move that may become a national requirement.

Methamphetamine abuse started in California and Oregon but spread rapidly into the Midwest. Now the drug has reached the East Coast. "Meth has made a steady march across the United States," says Steve Suo, a reporter for Portland's The Oregonian who has followed meth from the beginning. "Right now you have Mexican methamphetamine flooding in through Atlanta, and from there [it] fans out both south and north." The discovery of meth labs in states from Maine to Florida foreshadows a new crisis on the East Coast: "They can expect to see increased car theft, increased identity theft, domestic violence, child neglect, drug overdoses and just a lot of mayhem," says Suo. Indeed, statistics show that meth can trigger a surge in other crimes: In Oregon, a staggering 85 percent of property crime, as well as a majority of muggings, car thefts and identity thefts, have been linked to the drug.

Meth's destructive power comes from its impact on the user's brain. "Dopamine is the brain's primary pleasure chemical," says UCLA professor and meth expert Dr. Richard Rawson. "If you take a hit on a pipe or an injection of methamphetamine, you get an increase from zero to about 1,250 units.… This produces an extreme peak of euphoria that people describe as something like they've never experienced." Researchers have found that meth creates this high by destroying the very part of the brain that generates dopamine, which makes them unable to feel pleasure from anything except more meth. "It actually changes how the brain operates," Rawson continues. "It's a wonder anyone ever gets off meth." According to the World Health Organization, meth abuse worldwide is worse than that of cocaine and heroin combined.

"The Meth Epidemic" tells the story of two potential solutions to the crisis and examines why neither was fully tried. In the mid-80s, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration first proposed controlling the retail sale of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine in cold medicines by having customers register at the counter and limiting how much they could buy. Pharmaceutical companies, however, resisted the DEA's plan. Allan Rexinger, a lobbyist for the pharmaceutical industry, felt the DEA was overreacting and unfairly punishing a legitimate business ...

The second DEA approach was to regulate the source of the ingredients. Ephedrine and pseudoephedrine are highly sophisticated chemicals that can only be produced in a handful of huge, legal laboratories worldwide, thus making them potentially easy to track. But with Washington's primary focus on cocaine and heroin, meth took a bureaucratic back seat ...

Today, the number of meth addicts is skyrocketing: With 1.4 million users in the U.S. alone and millions more around the world, the United Nations calls meth the most abused hard drug on earth."
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#11 Aug 13, 2010
watch this PBS frontline video:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/meth/...

to quote the description:

"Speed. Meth. Glass. On the street, methamphetamine has many names. What started as a fad among West Coast motorcycle gangs in the 1970s has spread across the United States, and despite lawmakers' calls for action, the drug is now more potent, and more destructive, than at any time in the past decade. In "The Meth Epidemic," FRONTLINE, in association with The Oregonian, investigates the meth rampage in America: the appalling impact on individuals, families and communities, and the difficulty of controlling an essential ingredient in meth—ephedrine and pseudoephedrine—sold legally in over-the-counter cold remedies.
 
In Congress, a bipartisan coalition has called for international controls on ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, either of which is essential for making meth. Many states [see map] have forced cold medicines containing these ingredients off retail shelves and behind the pharmacy counter -- a move that may become a national requirement.

Methamphetamine abuse started in California and Oregon but spread rapidly into the Midwest. Now the drug has reached the East Coast. "Meth has made a steady march across the United States," says Steve Suo, a reporter for Portland's The Oregonian who has followed meth from the beginning. "Right now you have Mexican methamphetamine flooding in through Atlanta, and from there [it] fans out both south and north." The discovery of meth labs in states from Maine to Florida foreshadows a new crisis on the East Coast: "They can expect to see increased car theft, increased identity theft,… domestic violence, child neglect, drug overdoses and just a lot of mayhem," says Suo. Indeed, statistics show that meth can trigger a surge in other crimes: In Oregon, a staggering 85 percent of property crime, as well as a majority of muggings, car thefts and identity thefts, have been linked to the drug.

Meth's destructive power comes from its impact on the user's brain. "Dopamine is the brain's primary pleasure chemical," says UCLA professor and meth expert Dr. Richard Rawson. "If you take a hit on a pipe or an injection of methamphetamine, you get an increase from zero to about 1,250 units.… This produces an extreme peak of euphoria that people describe as something like they've never experienced." Researchers have found that meth creates this high by destroying the very part of the brain that generates dopamine, which makes them unable to feel pleasure from anything except more meth. "It actually changes how the brain operates," Rawson continues. "It's a wonder anyone ever gets off meth." According to the World Health Organization, meth abuse worldwide is worse than that of cocaine and heroin combined.

"The Meth Epidemic" tells the story of two potential solutions to the crisis and examines why neither was fully tried. In the mid-80s, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration first proposed controlling the retail sale of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine in cold medicines by having customers register at the counter and limiting how much they could buy. Pharmaceutical companies, however, resisted the DEA's plan. Allan Rexinger, a lobbyist for the pharmaceutical industry, felt the DEA was overreacting and unfairly punishing a legitimate business ...

The second DEA approach was to regulate the source of the ingredients. Ephedrine and pseudoephedrine are highly sophisticated chemicals that can only be produced in a handful of huge, legal laboratories worldwide, thus making them potentially easy to track. But with Washington's primary focus on cocaine and heroin, meth took a bureaucratic back seat ...

Today, the number of meth addicts is skyrocketing: With 1.4 million users in the U.S. alone and millions more around the world, the United Nations calls meth the most abused hard drug on earth."
Just wondering

Santa Cruz, CA

#12 Aug 13, 2010
Why won't the meth lovers comment here. I want to hear their reasons for legalizing it. Here are two reasons from a lawyer who defends criminals:

http://www.strike-the-root.com/61/victor/vict...

"When I was in law school, a wise law professor of mine taught me that if you are asking the wrong question, the answer doesn’t matter. In regards to meth, the question is not whether meth is dangerous and unhealthy. Over the years, I have represented countless meth users. I have seen the consequences of meth use up close. I am convinced meth use will likely ruin the user’s life. It is an extraordinarily dangerous addictive drug. Few drugs are more addictive or dangerous than meth.[2] Many of those who oppose legalization of meth identify the horrors of meth use. I entirely agree with their assessment of meth’s dangers. Asking whether meth is dangerous or unhealthy or addictive is not the right question.

The relevant question is whether our society would be better served if meth was manufactured, distributed, bought and sold legally. The answer is yes. There are two related but separate reasons why ending the drug war is critical. First, a free society requires that the drug war end. I refer to this argument as the freedom argument. Second, the consequences of ending the drug war would yield economic and other benefits which would greatly benefit our society. I refer to this argument as the consequentialist argument."
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#13 Aug 14, 2010
those who want to legalize Meth can sign this online petition i found on the Internet:

http://www.petitionspot.com/petitions/legal-m...

this is why they support legalizing Meth:

"There's no rational reason to why people hate meth. If you hate it, you prolly [sic] have been brainwashed by the government controlled massmedia. There's a conspiracy behind that, sometimes I see their black copters and narcs trying to find out...

ANYWAY

1st) Meth is not toxic, compared to alcohol.

Contrary to popular belief it isn't a mix of lye and battery acid (those 2 chemicals cancels each other out anyway, LOLZ). It's just a energized version of cough medication. It's also prescribed to kids as young as 3yrs old for ADD. Would they give lye+acid+crap to OUR CHILDREN!? No! It's just that meth is pure as CRYSTAL, lol.

2nd) Meth is natural for the brain, a supplement.

It's a cousin of adrenalin, just longer lasting and feel better. It's a relief from the condition called "sleep", it makes you productive, fun, etc. It also stimulate your brain cells, making you smarter and able to process more data. For example I can build a microwave out of recuperated random electronic parts!!!!!

3rd) Tweakers are nice: Don't be disrespectin' us.

I'm not anti-social. Actually I'm very talkative and I can have a long conversation with anyone. I can also explain you how the universe works or how to fix society. Nice huh? People who give a bad image to meth should not be able to buy this beautiful crystal again.

I'm tired of those pigs following me around. This is harassment. You're against harassment, RIGHT!? Join the Beautiful Crystal Cause. Thank you."
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#14 Aug 14, 2010
Meth and murder:

http://www.clipsyndicate.com/video/play/79917...

"a lot of times they can't control themselves" said the police officer.
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#15 Aug 15, 2010
there are some legitimate uses of Meth.

LOOK OVER THIS WEBSITE -- IT IS A TREASURE TROVE OF INFO ABOUT METH:

http://www.kci.org/meth_info/faq_meth.htm

to quote:

"A. In some cases, doctors prescribe low doses of methamphetamine for narcolepsy and attention deficit disorder."
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#16 Aug 15, 2010
"Methamphetamine Abuse Linked To Underage Sex, Smoking And Drinking"

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/...

"ScienceDaily (Oct. 29, 2008)— Children and adolescents who abuse alcohol or are sexually active are more likely to take methamphetamines (MA), also known as 'meth' or 'speed'. New research reveals the risk factors associated with MA use, in both low-risk children (those who don't take drugs) and high-risk children (those who have taken other drugs or who have ever attended juvenile detention centres).

MA is a stimulant, usually smoked, snorted or injected. It produces sensations of euphoria, lowered inhibitions, feelings of invincibility, increased wakefulness, heightened sexual experiences, and hyperactivity resulting from increased energy for extended periods of time. According to the lead author of this study, Terry P. Klassen of the University of Alberta, Canada, "MA is produced, or 'cooked', quickly, reasonably simply, and cheaply by using legal and readily available ingredients with recipes that can be found on the internet".

Because of the low cost, ready availability and legal status of the drug, long- term use can be a serious problem. In order to assess the risk factors that are associated with people using MA, Klassen and his team carried out an analysis of twelve different medical studies, combining their results to get a bigger picture of the MA problem. They said, "Within the low-risk group, there were some clear patterns of risk factors associated with MA use. A history of engaging in behaviors such as sexual activity, alcohol consumption and smoking was significantly associated with MA use among low-risk youth. Engaging in these kinds of behaviors may be a gateway for MA use or vice versa. A homosexual or bisexual lifestyle is also a risk factor."

Amongst high-risk youth, the risk factors the authors identified were, "growing up in an unstable family environment (e.g., family history of crime, alcohol use and drug use) and having received treatment for psychiatric conditions. Among high-risk youth, being female was also a risk factor"."
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#17 Aug 16, 2010
http://www.crisisconnectioninc.org/pdf/Porn.p...

to quote:

"There are two side-effects of methamphetamine that are of particular consequence to this report: hypersexuality and aggression. Many people are familiar with the increased aggressiveness that many Meth users exhibit. In geographic areas where Meth has become a “problem,” law enforcement and agencies that work with victims of crime consistently report an increase in men’s child abuse, animal abuse and domestic and sexual violence.

Hypersexuality is a clinical term referring to the sexual behavior changes that Meth users commonly undergo. Meth users frequently become hypersexual (extremely active) which results in lower inhibitions, artificial feelings of intimacy, a voracious appetite for pornography, high-risk sex, and the inability to control their sexual behavior (1,2,3)."
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#18 Aug 16, 2010
this is sobering:

http://www.justice.gov/dea/pubs/pressrel/meth...

to quote from the U.S. Department of Justice:

"Meth is made in America as well as internationally

Unlike heroin, cocaine, or Ecstasy, it is produced here within our borders. We can’t blame other countries for this problem.

Meth is not just a big city problem

Meth has become the most dangerous drug problem of small-town America. Traffickers make and distribute the drug in some of our country’s most rural areas. Twelve to fourteen year olds that live in smaller towns are 104% more likely to use meth than those who live in larger cities.

"Tabletop" labs on the increase

One of the reasons meth is such a threat in rural America is because it is cheap and easy to make. Drugs that can be bought over the counter at local stores are mixed with other common ingredients to make meth. Small labs to cook the drug can be set up on tables in kitchens, countertops, garages or just about anywhere. Although superlabs, operated by sophisticated traffickers still supply the majority of meth, these smaller tabletop labs have increased exponentially in the last decade, setting an alarming trend.

Meth hurts not just individuals, but families, neighborhoods and entire communities

Meth is a powerfully addictive and violent drug. Its use can result in fatal kidney and lung disorders, brain damage, liver damage, chronic depression, paranoia and other physical and mental disorders. Recent studies have demonstrated that meth causes more damage to the brain than alcohol, heroin, or cocaine.

Environmental harm: The chemicals used to make meth are toxic, and the lab operators routinely dump waste into streams, rivers, fields, and sewage systems. The chemical vapors produced during cooking permeate the walls and carpets of houses and buildings, making them uninhabitable. Cleaning up these sites requires specialized training and costs an average of $2,000 $4,000 per site in funds that come out of the already-strained budgets of state and local police.

Hundreds of children are neglected every year after living with parents who are meth “cooks.” More than 20% of the meth labs seized last year had children present.

So how do we reclaim our towns? We have a three-fold approach:

Enforcement: Dismantle meth trafficking organizations and both the superlabs that are trafficking the drugs across state and national borders and the tabletop labs that produce local supplies. At the federal level, the DEA goes after the major traffickers. At the local level, the DEA trains local and state law enforcement agents in spotting and safely seizing smaller operations. The DEA also assists with clean-up costs of these labs.

Community Engagement and Prevention: Prevention drug use is the first step to avoiding drug abuse. Schools, churches, businesses and, most importantly, families need to be aware of the danger that meth poses. Parents should not take it for granted that their children understand the risks associated with a drug like methamphetamine because too many kids don’t. Businesses can also get involved through drug-testing programs. Retail outlets can also help by controlling the volume of precursor chemicals any one individual can buy over the counter. This will help block local dealers from setting up tabletop labs.

Follow-up: Methamphetamine has a phenomenal rate of addiction, with some experts saying users can get hooked after just one use. It’s not enough to just put the traffickers of drugs in jail, we need to help those who suffer addiction to heal. Only by breaking that cycle of demand can we bring lasting change to the entire community. We must look to treatment and alternative sentencing procedures, like drug courts and restorative justice, for non violent users."
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#19 Aug 17, 2010
Meth addiction is very difficult to treat:

http://www.methamphetamine.org/html/treatment...

to quote:

"Meth dependence is a difficult disorder to treat. The following characterization of the clinical challenges of treating meth users is condensed from CSAT TIP #33. Withdrawal from meth dependence is characterized by a protracted anhedonia and dysphoria that is accompanied by severe craving for the drug. Craving frequently occurs in response to exposure to conditioned cues (stimuli present during past episodes of meth use and euphoria). Such cues evoke powerful craving for meth via classical conditioning principles. The likelihood of continued meth smoking or injecting appears to be, in part, related to the strength of the craving experienced from these craving-generating cues. The withdrawal dysphoria present in the context of ubiquitous meth availability and ubiquitous conditioned cues can produce a very pernicious dependence; indeed, inpatient hospitalization may be indicated to treat long-term meth dependence, at least in initial stages of detoxification. Medically managed inpatient care is expensive, however, and widespread meth abuse has appeared in impoverished populations with very limited access to such inpatient resources."
curious cat

Santa Cruz, CA

#20 Aug 18, 2010
this one pot Meth cooking is very disturbing. it is the new trend in local Meth production. how many one pot Meth cookers do we have in Santa Cruz? the City Council really needs to address this one pot Meth production (before it gets out of hand).

http://www.arkansas.gov/senate/newsroom/index...

"LITTLE ROCK - In large part because of the growing use of "one pot" cooking, the number of meth lab busts in Arkansas has started to climb again.

The frequency of meth labs that were broken up by Arkansas law enforcement agencies dropped greatly after passage of Act 256 of 2005. The law requires consumers to show an ID before they can buy certain cold medications that are used in the manufacture of methamphetamine. However, law enforcement authorities are concerned that "one pot" cooking allows meth manufacturers to more easily skirt the restrictions in Act 256. Methamphetamine is an extremely addictive form of speed made from household chemicals that can be purchased legally, such as lawn fertilizer, batteries and lye or drain cleaner. One of the ingredients, pseudoephedrine, is found in common cold medications.

The consumer's name goes into a computer data base so law enforcement authorities can track suspicious purchases, such as a person going all over town buying up the maximum allowable quantity of cold medication. Act 256 was modeled after an Oklahoma law, where authorities reported an 80 percent reduction in the number of meth labs they broke up. However, "one pot" cooking has caused an increase in meth busts in Oklahoma in the past two years.

In Arkansas, after passage of Act 256 the number of meth lab busts went down from more than 1,200 in 2004 to a low of 375 in 2007. However, in 2008 the number of busts went up to 418 and in 2009 up to 668. The total for 2009 may actually be greater because some cases are still not final, and thus have not been counted yet.

Law officers throughout the United States began noticing the rise of "one pot" labs in 2008. In Arkansas, as in many other states, the majority of meth labs discovered are now "one pot" labs.

After Act 256 took effect, police agencies began to see a shift in the source of meth. Instead of cooking it themselves, more addicts began buying a form called "ice" that was made in Mexico or in western states. It was relatively pure, often as much as 80 percent pure.

Arkansas meth users shifted back to cooking it themselves for a couple of reasons. The Mexican "ice" is much less pure these days, about 30 percent, whereas "one pot" cooking produces a very pure form of the drug. It also is called the "shake and bake" method. The meth is produced in a 20-ounce or two-liter soda bottle.

The prevalence of "one pot" labs is that more manufacturers are now cooking meth in moving vehicles and throwing the trash, and the evidence, out the window. Some police officers refer to them as "trash labs."

There is a greater risk of fire with the "one pot" method. According to news reports, there were 16 fires caused by meth labs in Tulsa last year, as well as at least 18 cases of people dying from an overdose of meth.

In 2005 Oregon was the first state to require a doctor's prescription to buy cold and allergy medications containing pseudoephedrine. Although consumers complained of the inconvenience, the law was a factor in the reduction of meth lab busts in Oregon to only 10 last year. The Mississippi legislature recently passed a bill to require prescriptions for cold medications with pseudoephedrine. It will take effect July 1."

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