created by: CitizenTopix | Oct 12, 2010

California

4,458 votes

CA Proposition 23 - Global Warming

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7,001 - 7,020 of 7,846 Comments Last updated 1 hr ago

Since: Nov 12

Sacramento, CA

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#7588
Aug 18, 2013
 

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guest wrote:
<quoted text>
Al Gore was NEVER the president of the US, you fcking dumbazz. You might want to get such basic facts straight before running your mouth on Topix.
typo, very sorry, please accept that I meant vice president.
Kathy Overdone

Oakland, CA

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#7592
Aug 18, 2013
 

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1

Never be sorry honey. Shove dim ice cubes up your ass.
Shouldered from

Covina, CA

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#7596
Aug 18, 2013
 

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If they were LED powered then ahfihe a8dshuhbsu4e a h43u7wtg rd asufhnodjk askifhsi fjuuu 78685 skifhis;skifuhs jufhbs dord ofghdei then you turn them off.
Hnfjdhifo slkjfoijxdo xpofjonmxdkhj sufdjxj 89nm dfuy764e8hirdj s95ru95uj d94798ejrt s97u49se then sirfhi8sy 9e3hjis fdthre a03uij9suj rf would asifhis be aodjis better zaohjfdish place tosji fish to fjusednh23watch th asishow d=from.

AWhat a terrible responaabiltu sifhiusd siufhis sihf isahudf sihfisnkif sifhisxhfi s to deode this it alodjisdhf slojfi xd will be such a sifhis bother,suigfuyxshr kjjifjhsd.
Adrian Vance

Union City, CA

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#7598
Aug 19, 2013
 
CO2 is a “trace gas” in air, insignificant by definition. It absorbs 1/7th as much IR, heat energy, from sunlight as water vapor which has 188
times as many molecules capturing 1200 times as much heat making 99.9% of all "global warming." CO2 does only 0.1% of it. For this we should destroy our economy?

Carbon combustion generates 80% of our energy. Control and taxing of carbon would give the elected ruling class more power and money than
anything since the Magna Carta of 1215 AD.

See The Two Minute Conservative via Google or: http://adrianvance.blogspot.com and when you speak ladies will swoon and liberal gentlemen will weep.
Ramped Up

Covina, CA

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#7599
Aug 19, 2013
 

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1

Computer Dictionary
386: No, 486: Oops, Pentium: The only chip to consider if you're thinking of buying a PC. Until Intel ramps up the 686.
640K: The salary the average Wall Street PC analyst pulls in each year.
Algorithm: A catchy 1930 song by George and Ira Gershwin.
Availability: Date when a dozen copies of the beta version will be hurriedly shrink-wrapped for the benefit of the press and the investment community.
Backup: The chore you were really, honestly, going to do the very next thing before you switched drive letters and accidentally copied older, out-of-date versions of you files over all your newer ones at 3 a.m.
Buffer: The only other job - involving a chamois at the car wash - for which most computer store salespeople are qualified.
Bundled software: Free applications like home dentistry packages and Esperanto spelling dictionaries that are thrown in with cheap clones so you think you're getting real value for your money.
CD-ROM: A $30 dollar mechanism in a $300 cabinet that accesses vast quantities of valuable information too slowly to use.
Copy protection: A sly technique employed by hardware vendors to combat software piracy by continually changing the size and compatibility of disk drives (from 160K to 320K to 360K to 1.2MB to 720K to 1.44MB to 2.88MB, etc.).
CP/M: An antiquated operation system from the early days of computing, based on inscrutable prompts like A>, terse commands, and absurdly backward conventions, such as 11-character limits on filenames. Contrasted with today's modern versions of DOS.
Database, flat-file: A program selling for under $500 that most people use to keep lists of names and addresses, etc.
Database, relational/programmable: A program selling for over $500 that most people use to keep lists of names and addresses, etc.
Debugging: The process of uncovering glitches by packaging prerelease software as finished products, then waiting for irate customers to report problems.
Downward compatibility: You really didn't have to spend the money for the upgraded version, since all you use anyway is the old set of features.
End User: One born every minute.
Entry level: Only slightly above most users' heads.
Expanded memory: RAM that is, uh, well, um, different from extended memory.
Expansion slot: The computer didn't come with everything you needed.
Extended memory: RAM that is, uh, well, um, different from expanded memory.
FAX: Originally a last resort for procrastinators who missed the final Federal Express pickup; these days, an expensive way to order lunch from the pizza place around the corner.
Firmware: Software with permanent bugs hardwired into it.
Icon: One picture is worth a thousand lawsuits. Or, as Shakespeare might have put it, "He who steals my trash better have a large purse.
Installation routine: A process employed by many applications to overwrite and thereby trash the user's existing and painstakingly created AUTOEXEC.BAT and CONFIG.SYS files
Interface, character-based: A way of presenting information to the user that's every bit as good as a user interface except in the areas of readability, ease of use, intuitiveness, and productivity.
Interface, graphic user (GUI): An increasingly popular way of presenting information to the user, originally designed by Xerox PARC and now being adopted by dozens of competitors; otherwise known as the Trial Attorney Full Employment Act.
Laptop: A dinky keyboard wedded to a lousy LCD screen, all with bad battery life.
Live links: A clever system that lets you unknowingly corrupt data in lots of separate files at the same time.
Low-bandwidth: The process of talking to a corporate press relations official.(Question: How many IBM PR types does it take to change a light bulb? Answer: We'll have to get back to you on that.)
Nanosecond: The time it takes after your warranty expires for your hard disk to start making a sound like a monkey wrench in a blender.
Ramped Up

Covina, CA

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#7600
Aug 19, 2013
 

Judged:

1

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1

Interface, character-based: A way of presenting information to the user that's every bit as good as a user interface except in the areas of readability, ease of use, intuitiveness, and productivity.

Interface, graphic user (GUI): An increasingly popular way of presenting information to the user, originally designed by Xerox PARC and now being adopted by dozens of competitors; otherwise known as the Trial Attorney Full Employment Act.

Laptop: A dinky keyboard wedded to a lousy LCD screen, all with bad battery life.

Live links: A clever system that lets you unknowingly corrupt data in lots of separate files at the same time.

Low-bandwidth: The process of talking to a corporate press relations official.(Question: How many IBM PR types does it take to change a light bulb? Answer: We'll have to get back to you on that.)

Nanosecond: The time it takes after your warranty expires for your hard disk to start making a sound like a monkey wrench in a blender.

NiCad battery: A cell that powers a laptop long enough to let you do three solid hours of work, then dies before you're ready to save any of it to disk.

Open system: Made up of parts from different manufacturers so that, when you crash, each vendor can blame the others.

Optional: It should have come free, but someone in the marketing department ran 1-2-3 and figured they'd double their profits this way.

Parity: A ninth memory bit that one time in nine will crash an otherwise perfectly functioning system when it detects an error in itself.

Partition: A wall you have to build around a noisy dot matrix printer that makes only slightly less noise than a tree chipper.

Point-and-shoot: You mean you'd rather click on a menu choice than have to type things like DEVICE=DOSUTSDRIVER.SYS /D:0 /T:80 /S:15 /H:2 /F:1 ?

Power Surge: What an MIS director feels when he denies you access to your own database.

Power user: Someone who's read the manual all the way through once.

Productivity: Printing out 30 different versions of your document before getting the spacing correct.

Real-time clock: A 50-dollar option based on a five-cent chip.

SAA: Silly And Awkward.

Shell: A clumsy program that forces users to stumble through ten menus to get anything done instead of typing a simple three-character command.

Shock-mounted: Make sure you're sitting down when you ask the price.

Spreadsheet: Sophisticated software that can be used as a database, rudimentary word processor, graphing program, and, in a pinch, a ledger.

Stack: The place in the corner of the room where you pile unopened software manuals.

Standard: Manufactured by the company that does the flashiest advertising.

Support: Fast, simple, courteous, friendly, accurate help available to any user who happens to work for any company that bought 1,000 copies of the product.

Throughput: What you feel like doing with your foot and your computer screen after you see the message "General Failure Error Reading Drive C:".

Toll-free hotline: An AT&T busy-signal test number.

Toner cartridge: A device to refill laser printers; invented by the Association of American Dry Cleaners.

Torture test: Everyone - from the FedEx guy to the clerk who opened the box to the trainee who executed the speed test - accidentally dropped it.

Tutorial: A program that forces you to sit through lessons on every last obscure and little-used feature of an application while ignoring overall fundamental tricks that would make you far more productive.

Unix, year of: See Calendar, perpetual.

Value-added: A lot more expensive.

Virus: Commonly, the belief of incompetent users that some mysterious external force is to blame for their mistakes at the keyboard.

Workstation: Any PC that sells for more than $10,000.

XT: All the computer that most users who just type letters and run typical spreadsheets will ever need, even though a 386 machine will reformat their text a whole tenth of a second faster.
Ramped Up

Covina, CA

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#7601
Aug 19, 2013
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Computer Dictionary
386: No, 486: Oops, Pentium: The only chip to consider if you're thinking of buying a PC. Until Intel ramps up the 686.
640K: The salary the average Wall Street PC analyst pulls in each year.
Algorithm: A catchy 1930 song by George and Ira Gershwin.
Availability: Date when a dozen copies of the beta version will be hurriedly shrink-wrapped for the benefit of the press and the investment community.
Backup: The chore you were really, honestly, going to do the very next thing before you switched drive letters and accidentally copied older, out-of-date versions of you files over all your newer ones at 3 a.m.
Buffer: The only other job - involving a chamois at the car wash - for which most computer store salespeople are qualified.
Bundled software: Free applications like home dentistry packages and Esperanto spelling dictionaries that are thrown in with cheap clones so you think you're getting real value for your money.
CD-ROM: A $30 dollar mechanism in a $300 cabinet that accesses vast quantities of valuable information too slowly to use.
Copy protection: A sly technique employed by hardware vendors to combat software piracy by continually changing the size and compatibility of disk drives (from 160K to 320K to 360K to 1.2MB to 720K to 1.44MB to 2.88MB, etc.).
CP/M: An antiquated operation system from the early days of computing, based on inscrutable prompts like A>, terse commands, and absurdly backward conventions, such as 11-character limits on filenames. Contrasted with today's modern versions of DOS.
Database, flat-file: A program selling for under $500 that most people use to keep lists of names and addresses, etc.
Database, relational/programmable: A program selling for over $500 that most people use to keep lists of names and addresses, etc.
Debugging: The process of uncovering glitches by packaging prerelease software as finished products, then waiting for irate customers to report problems.
Downward compatibility: You really didn't have to spend the money for the upgraded version, since all you use anyway is the old set of features.
for your hard disk to start making a sound like a monkey wrench in a blender.
of typing a simple three-character command.
Shock-mounted: Make sure you're sitting down when you ask the price.
Spreadsheet: Sophisticated software that can be used as a database, rudimentary word processor, graphing program, and, in a pinch, a ledger.
Stack: The place in the corner of the room where you pile unopened software manuals.
Standard: Manufactured by the company that does the flashiest advertising.
Support: Fast, simple, courteous, friendly, accurate help available to any user who happens to work for any company that bought 1,000 copies of the product.
Throughput: What you feel like doing with your foot and your computer screen after you see the message "General Failure Error Reading Drive C:".
Toll-free hotline: An AT&T busy-signal test number.
Toner cartridge: A device to refill laser printers; invented by the Association of American Dry Cleaners.
Torture test: Everyone - from the FedEx guy to the clerk who opened the box to the trainee who executed the speed test - accidentally dropped it.
Tutorial: A program that forces you to sit through lessons on every last obscure and little-used feature of an application while ignoring overall fundamental tricks that would make you far more productive.
Unix, year of: See Calendar, perpetual.
Value-added: A lot more expensive.
Virus: Commonly, the belief of incompetent users that some mysterious external force is to blame for their mistakes at the keyboard.
Workstation: Any PC that sells for more than $10,000.
XT: All the computer that most users who just type letters and run typical spreadsheets will ever need, even though a 386 machine will reformat their text a whole tenth of a second faster.
Barbarbaa

Oakland, CA

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#7604
Aug 20, 2013
 

Judged:

1

I'm so damn hot my piss is boiling when it flows out. I'm worried, I think the end is near! You'll find me in the freezer. So long old friends.
MM and Jack

Covina, CA

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#7605
Aug 20, 2013
 

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1

There must be a "hole" in the atmosphere some where and it's leaking the good stuff out too?
Jewel

Glendora, CA

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#7608
Oct 4, 2013
 

Judged:

1

Just take a breath
Flounders

San Dimas, CA

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#7609
Oct 4, 2013
 
The government shutdown, largely orchestrated by Tea Party leader Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, is proceeding with House Republicans following Sen. Cruz’s playbook to the letter, offering up all kinds of cockamamie piecemeal funding bills instead of just simply agreeing to fund the government -- like the American people overwhelmingly want them to do.
Recovering Liberal

Vacaville, CA

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#7610
Oct 4, 2013
 
Flounders wrote:
The government shutdown, largely orchestrated by Tea Party leader Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, is proceeding with House Republicans following Sen. Cruz’s playbook to the letter, offering up all kinds of cockamamie piecemeal funding bills instead of just simply agreeing to fund the government -- like the American people overwhelmingly want them to do.
flounder
intransitive verb
: to move in an awkward way with a lot of difficulty and effort
: to be unsure about what to do or say
: to have a lot of problems and difficulties
Just so you understand the situation flounder.
The American people by an overwhelming majority do NOT like or want the Affordable Care Act.
All president Obama has to do is suspend the funding for one year and agree to negotiate the bill and we would not have a government shutdown, now would we!
Pin Heads

San Dimas, CA

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#7611
Oct 4, 2013
 

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Watch out for the Pin-heads from the Republican and Tea Party.
Pin Heads

San Dimas, CA

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#7612
Oct 4, 2013
 

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And all the IDIOTS from the Republican and Tea Party Terrorists parties have to sign a Loyalty Oath, or get arrested and shipped off Feet First to Cuba.

Since: Nov 12

Elk Grove, CA

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#7613
Oct 4, 2013
 
Pin Heads wrote:
Watch out for the Pin-heads from the Republican and Tea Party.
Why? because they don't buy into the global warming hoax?

Since: Nov 12

Elk Grove, CA

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#7614
Oct 4, 2013
 
Flounders wrote:
The government shutdown, largely orchestrated by Tea Party leader Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, is proceeding with House Republicans following Sen. Cruz’s playbook to the letter, offering up all kinds of cockamamie piecemeal funding bills instead of just simply agreeing to fund the government -- like the American people overwhelmingly want them to do.
BS, the dems are loving this, it's what they want to cry next elections. But really who cares? So what you can't visit Yosemite, the shutdown makes no difference in most people's lives. I stopped following it, it's boring.
Wringers

San Dimas, CA

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#7616
Oct 5, 2013
 

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Those worthless pecker heads are now in their second day of the KKK-SkinHead gathering [GOP, Republican, Tea Party] member's in Anaheim, California.
Hot Flash

San Francisco, CA

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#7617
Oct 6, 2013
 
Obama Boo Boo done fry's my butt!
Flounders

San Dimas, CA

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#7618
Oct 7, 2013
 
Look at the fools in Washington D.C. who are calling themselves GOP, Republican and Tea Party baggers. Just a shame and the last gasp of these politically dumb fools.

Since: Nov 12

Elk Grove, CA

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#7619
Oct 7, 2013
 
Flounders wrote:
Look at the fools in Washington D.C. who are calling themselves GOP, Republican and Tea Party baggers. Just a shame and the last gasp of these politically dumb fools.
It doesn't affect your welfare check, just stay home from the National Cemetery....

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