_____ Republicans Versus Women _____

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#62
Oct 31, 2012
 

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Women and supporters of equal rights for everyone ..... please read the thread on the link in post #1. On the link read the posts under the user-name 'DayStar' down to post #28.

Vote Democrat in this election. It's not a matter of new rights, but in keeping a lot of the rights we now have.
Clear Thinker

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#63
Nov 1, 2012
 
___Jenny___ wrote:
<quoted text>
The Republicans made the pill a political issue, not me. But this is only one of the issues, and it is an issue, otherwise why were the Republican party leaders yelling so much about the pill a few months ago.
There are many reasons to vote for President Obama over Romney. What is in DayStar and my thread (on the link in post #1) are issues women need to consider due to the repercussions to women and our rights if the 'new' Republican party comes into power with Romney as President.
Btw, even Romney stated in the Presidential debate that the mess Bush left was outrageous. The problem is that Romney is going to be even worse for middle-class working families.
Can we agree the pill is irrelevant?

Obama created Obamacare in spite of republican's warnings that it would be disastrous to the economy. Because of that democrats are now an endangered species. Hopefully we can finish the job next week.

Bush left a mess due to the 911 attacks and the following wars, yet he still didn't add as much to the deficit as Obama has.

You're right, I don't expect Romney to fix this mess, nobody can because it's too late. But a new face in the white house will delay the inevitable, and hopefully he'll stumble on a solution that nobody else has seen yet.

You're still not seeing the big picture, maybe someday.
zipyourlip

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#64
Nov 1, 2012
 

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___Jenny___ wrote:
<quoted text>
The Republicans made the pill a political issue, not me. But this is only one of the issues, and it is an issue, otherwise why were the Republican party leaders yelling so much about the pill a few months ago.
There are many reasons to vote for President Obama over Romney. What is in DayStar and my thread (on the link in post #1) are issues women need to consider due to the repercussions to women and our rights if the 'new' Republican party comes into power with Romney as President.
Btw, even Romney stated in the Presidential debate that the mess Bush left was outrageous. The problem is that Romney is going to be even worse for middle-class working families.
WASHINGTON — Americans' confidence in the economy surged last month to the highest level in nearly five years, as many were encouraged by an improving job market.

The Conference Board says its consumer confidence index increased in October to 72.2. That's up from 70.3 in September and the highest reading since February 2008, two months into the Great Recession.

Consumers were more confident after seeing better job growth, the report noted. Hiring in July and August was stronger than first thought, and employers added a modest 114,000 jobs in September, the government reported last month.

The survey is watched closely because consumer spending drives nearly 70 percent of economic activity. The reading is still below 90, a level that indicates a healthy economy. It last reached that level in December 2007......on another note, I get the biggest chuckle from right winged zealots, who talk about free birth control pills. There is nothing free about the premiums, that women are paying for their healthcare insurance plans. Prescription drug coverage should be included in everyone's insurance plans.
zipyourlip

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#65
Nov 1, 2012
 

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WASHINGTON -- Over the past month, Mitt Romney touted similarities between the fiscal mess he inherited as Massachusetts governor and the current U.S. budget deficit, arguing that he reached bipartisan solutions to his state's problems and would do so again if elected president. His campaign bills the new theme as Romney's "closing argument" for the 2012 race, and presented it at all three presidential debates, in swing-state television ads and on the stump.

"I was elected as a Republican governor in a state with a legislature that was 85 percent Democrat," Romney said last week outside a construction services company in Ames, Iowa. "We were looking at a multi-billion dollar budget gap. But instead of fighting with one another, we came together to solve our problems."

A detailed Huffington Post review of Romney's budget proposals from his first year in office, however, reveals that he advocated deep cuts to programs serving the state's most vulnerable -- even when those cuts had little effect on the state's fiscal position. Romney's aggressive reductions to social programs did not earn support across the aisle. The state legislature ended up overriding more than 115 Romney vetoes in his first year as governor.

"There was no magic in the Romney approach," recalled former Democratic state Rep. Dan Bosley. It was "cut as many social programs as you can." Bosley added: "If we didn't override every one of his vetoes, we overrode most of his vetoes.… There wasn't a bipartisan effort to run government."

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#66
Nov 1, 2012
 

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Clear Thinker wrote:
<quoted text>
Can we agree the pill is irrelevant?
Obama created Obamacare in spite of republican's warnings that it would be disastrous to the economy. Because of that democrats are now an endangered species. Hopefully we can finish the job next week.
Bush left a mess due to the 911 attacks and the following wars, yet he still didn't add as much to the deficit as Obama has.
You're right, I don't expect Romney to fix this mess, nobody can because it's too late. But a new face in the white house will delay the inevitable, and hopefully he'll stumble on a solution that nobody else has seen yet.
You're still not seeing the big picture, maybe someday.
Romney wants to do away with President Obama's healthcare reform. But he wants to install Romneycare. Here is an example of what Romney did as Governor.

When Romney was governor one of the things he did was raise nursing home fees in his state. He raised it at different amounts on different size nursing homes.

Get this, Romney raised nursing home fees from $495 to $1,485. See the list below.

What will he do if he becomes president, does away with healthcare reform like he says he is, and have his way nationally?

Here's the fee increases at nursing homes Romney did as governor .....

1 to 30 beds, from $95 to $285

31 to 60 beds, from $160 to $480

61 to 90 beds, from $225 to $675

91 to 120 beds, from $295 to $885

121 to 150 beds, from $360 to $1,080

151 to 200 beds, from $425 to $1,275

More than 200 beds, from $495 to $1,485

This is an extremely distrubing sign of what Romney will do as president.

Warning ..... Romney has made it clear he is going to also mess with Medicare. One dangerous issue for the elderly is he wants to change it to a vourcher system. Vote against Romney.

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#67
Nov 1, 2012
 

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How many people on here are elderly? Or have a family member in a nursing home? You need to see what Romney did as Governor in raising nursing home fees. He also greatly raised fees for colleges among other things as Governor, but that's a separate issue. See my last post or read the list of increases he did at nursing homes (below).

1 to 30 beds, from $95 to $285
31 to 60 beds, from $160 to $480
61 to 90 beds, from $225 to $675
91 to 120 beds, from $295 to $885
121 to 150 beds, from $360 to $1,080
151 to 200 beds, from $425 to $1,275
More than 200 beds, from $495 to $1,485

Also he plans to change Medicare. And it's not in a good way.

Vote against Romney.

Now, back to the thread issue that the conservative men keep wanting to deflect away from.

Women, read the thread on the link in post #1.
zipyourlip

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#68
Nov 1, 2012
 
New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg endorsed President Barack Obama for re-election on Thursday, Bloomberg TV reported and the Huffington Post confirmed.

The mayor, an Independent, did not endorse a candidate in the 2008 election and hadn't seem poised to do so this time around as well. But he said in an op-ed published on his website, that his eagerness to see action on climate change legislation persuaded him to back a second term for the president. He also explained that while he admired Mitt Romney, there were a number of social issues that gave him pause.

I believe Mitt Romney is a good and decent man, and he would bring valuable business experience to the Oval Office. He understands that America was built on the promise of equal opportunity, not equal results. In the past he has also taken sensible positions on immigration, illegal guns, abortion rights and health care. But he has reversed course on all of them, and is even running against the health-care model he signed into law in Massachusetts.

If the 1994 or 2003 version of Mitt Romney were running for president, I may well have voted for him because, like so many other independents, I have found the past four years to be, in a word, disappointing.

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#69
Nov 1, 2012
 

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Clear Thinker wrote:
<quoted text>
Can we agree the pill is irrelevant?
Obama created Obamacare in spite of republican's warnings that it would be disastrous to the economy. Because of that democrats are now an endangered species. Hopefully we can finish the job next week.
Bush left a mess due to the 911 attacks and the following wars, yet he still didn't add as much to the deficit as Obama has.
You're right, I don't expect Romney to fix this mess, nobody can because it's too late. But a new face in the white house will delay the inevitable, and hopefully he'll stumble on a solution that nobody else has seen yet.
You're still not seeing the big picture, maybe someday.
An added note concerning your first sentence. This year, 2012, according to a Gallup survey 60 percent of us, women voters, in 12 key states, rated government policies on birth control as an extremely/very important issue influencing our vote, versus 39 percent of registered men voters. How many women voters do you think there are? And how many of us are peeved at Romney and the Republican leaders for all those anti-women bills over the last two years and over the stupid Republican remarks made toward women?

A bit of recent political history. In the 2008 Election .....

65.7 percent -- the percentage of eligible female voters who voted in the 2008 election.

61.5 percent -- the percentage of eligible male voters who voted in the 2008 election.

70.4 million -- the number of women who cast ballots in the 2008 presidential election, versus 60.7 million men.

56 percent -- the percentage of female voters who voted for Barack Obama in 2008, versus 43 percent for John McCain.

70 percent -- the percentage of 'single' female voters who voted for Barack Obama over John McCain in 2008.

What do you think of that? Those statistics are more than a bit spooky for Romney right now. That's why in the last two months he's been attempting to keep his mouth shut about certain issues concerning us. But it's too late. He already made it more than plain over the last year what he will do pertaining to us (women) and our rights if he is elected.
Hillbilly Jack

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#70
Nov 1, 2012
 
___Jenny___ wrote:
If you are a woman voter, or a supporter of equality for everyone, and want to know if there is really a republican party war against American women please go to this Topix thread link. Because there is a war targeting us. It's very real. The thread link has a great deal of information regarding it.
The thread on the link was writen by a friend and me. It's only another Topix thread so it's safe to go to.
http://www.topix.com/forum/columbus/TQB50LH6F...
Women and supporters of equal rights ..... vote against the Republicans in this election. Vote against Romney. Vote Democrat.
Most women under the Obama liberal socialist regime are living in poverty and can only find a low paying no benifit job.

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#71
Nov 1, 2012
 
Hillbilly Jack wrote:
<quoted text>Most women under the Obama liberal socialist regime are living in poverty and can only find a low paying no benifit job.
You 'are' totally clueless, aren't ya?
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#72
Nov 1, 2012
 

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By Bernie Woodall

DETROIT, Nov 1 (Reuters)- A Chrysler executive told Donald Trump in a Tweet on Thursday that the real estate executive and television personality was "full of shit" for repeating a notion that Chrysler is shipping U.S. Jeep production to China, which the automaker refutes.

Ralph Gilles, the head of product design for Chrysler, became the second top Chrysler executive in three days to strongly deny the claim, which was first made by Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney last week to a crowd in Ohio.

Trump, from his Twitter account, said, "Obama is a terrible negotiator. He bails out Chrysler and now Chrysler wants to send all Jeep manufacturing to China--and will!"

To which Gilles, from his Twitter account, responded to Trump: "You are full of shit!"

In a second Tweet, Gilles added: "I apologize for my language, but lies are just that, lies."

On Tuesday, Chrysler Group LLC Chief Executive Sergio Marchionne, in an e-mail to employees, also flatly denied Romney's claim.

"I feel obliged to unambiguously restate our position: Jeep production will not be moved from the United States to China," Marchionne wrote.

Romney, speaking a week ago to a crowd in Defiance, Ohio, said that he had read a news article that said Chrysler's Jeep brand is considering moving "all production to China."

Jeep, Chrysler's global brand, has three U.S. assembly plants, including one in Toledo, Ohio. The others are in Illinois and in Detroit.

Ohio is seen by pollsters as a key "swing" state in next Tuesday's presidential election. It has been the site of intense competition between the campaigns of Romney and President Barack Obama.

After Romney spoke in Defiance, his campaign aired an advertisement that did not repeat the move of production from Ohio but said that Chrysler is considering making Jeeps in China, which Chrysler has said it intends to do.

Marchionne said that any Jeep production in China would be for the Chinese market, and that the company would not take any production away from Chrysler's U.S. plants. Rather, he said, Chrysler is adding jobs and investment at its Ohio plant.

Chrysler has been managed by Fiat SpA since it emerged from its 2009 bankruptcy, when the Italian company took 20 percent ownership. Fiat has since increased its ownership to 58.5 percent.

Marchionne is chief executive of both Chrysler and Fiat.

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#73
Nov 1, 2012
 

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Five Myths About the So Called 'Republican War on Women'
Democrats can't run on their own record, so they are lobbing false claims against the GOP to win the female vote

By Mary Kate Cary
August 29, 2012 RSS Feed Print

In the 2010 midterm elections, the gender gap disappeared for the first time since the Reagan era. More Republican women were elected to the House than ever before, and four out of six current female governors are Republicans. In 2010, Republicans won the women's vote over Democrats by 49 percent to 48 percent, exit polls showed. Ever since, the Democratic political strategy has been to make female voters, who comprise more than half the electorate, their No. 1 target. The stakes are high: Democrats can't afford to lose the women's vote again if they expect to keep the White House and the Senate. This fall, Republicans need to pick up only four seats to take control of the Senate.

The problem for Democrats is they can't run on their record: The poverty rate among women is now the highest it's been in nearly two decades; 5.2 million women are unemployed. According to the National Women's Law Center, of the 2.7 million jobs created since 2009, only 567,000 have gone to women.

[See a collection of political cartoons on the economy.]

That explains why the Democrats jumped so quickly when the Republican nominee for the Senate from Missouri, Rep. Todd Akin, made offensive remarks about rape.

And while Republicans across the board called for Akin to withdraw from the race, Democrats were moving even faster. Liberal pundits on cable television were gleeful as the controversial clip played over and over. President Obama, trying to keep a straight face, held his first press conference in months in order to express his outrage. The "Republican war on women" was back on.

Not so fast. Let's take a look at five myths the left is selling about Republicans and women. If Tim Pawlenty can call Obama's policies "all foam and no beer," we might say that the so-called war on women is all dressing and no salad. All toast and no chicken salad. All frosting and no cupcake. You get the idea. Here's what they're saying:

[See a collection of political cartoons on the 2012 campaign.]

If you are pro-life, you are anti-woman. The left's premise is that men like Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan who are pro-life are anti-woman. But that doesn't account for the fact that more women are pro-life than pro-choice, according to Gallup. It makes no sense to claim that women who are Catholics, Christian evangelicals, Hispanic, or African-American, for example—many of whom consider themselves pro-life—are all opposed to women's rights. The left also doesn't take into account that the majority of Americans, from both genders, are pro-life. Gallup also reports that for the first time this year, 51 percent of Americans find abortion "morally wrong," with 38 percent finding it "morally acceptable." The number of Americans who identify themselves as "pro-choice" is at a record low, and a majority now call themselves "pro-life," with the biggest change coming among independents. Most Americans are pro-life, and I'd bet very few consider themselves "anti-woman."

Republicans believe that men should control women's bodies. "We shouldn't have a bunch of politicians, a majority of whom are men, making healthcare decisions on behalf of women," Obama said at his war-on-women press conference. Agreed. Yet under his Affordable Care Act, 15 unelected members of the Independent Payment Advisory Board will now decide which medical treatments will get federal funding, decisions that could affect millions of women. And don't forget that his individual mandate tells women which kind of health coverage they can buy. Contrast that with Ryan's Medicare premium support plan, which would give women a choice of Medicare or private insurance.

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#74
Nov 1, 2012
 

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Republicans want to take contraception away from women. Nobody is arguing that women should be denied access to contraception. The question is whether it should be provided free, should be paid for by taxpayers, and should be mandated for religious employers who find it a violation of their beliefs. It wasn't Republicans who ordered this change; it was the president's administration. Since that decision, polls have shown that the majority of Americans disagree with his stance and believe there should be the sort of religious exemption there has been in the past.

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#75
Nov 1, 2012
 

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a conservative voice wrote:
Five Myths About the So Called 'Republican War on Women'
Democrats can't run on their own record, so they are lobbing false claims against the GOP to win the female vote
By Mary Kate Cary
August 29, 2012 RSS Feed Print
In the 2010 midterm elections, the gender gap disappeared for the first time since the Reagan era. More Republican women were elected to the House than ever before, and four out of six current female governors are Republicans. In 2010, Republicans won the women's vote over Democrats by 49 percent to 48 percent, exit polls showed. Ever since, the Democratic political strategy has been to make female voters, who comprise more than half the electorate, their No. 1 target. The stakes are high: Democrats can't afford to lose the women's vote again if they expect to keep the White House and the Senate. This fall, Republicans need to pick up only four seats to take control of the Senate.
The problem for Democrats is they can't run on their record: The poverty rate among women is now the highest it's been in nearly two decades; 5.2 million women are unemployed. According to the National Women's Law Center, of the 2.7 million jobs created since 2009, only 567,000 have gone to women.
[See a collection of political cartoons on the economy.]
That explains why the Democrats jumped so quickly when the Republican nominee for the Senate from Missouri, Rep. Todd Akin, made offensive remarks about rape.
And while Republicans across the board called for Akin to withdraw from the race, Democrats were moving even faster. Liberal pundits on cable television were gleeful as the controversial clip played over and over. President Obama, trying to keep a straight face, held his first press conference in months in order to express his outrage. The "Republican war on women" was back on.
Not so fast. Let's take a look at five myths the left is selling about Republicans and women. If Tim Pawlenty can call Obama's policies "all foam and no beer," we might say that the so-called war on women is all dressing and no salad. All toast and no chicken salad. All frosting and no cupcake. You get the idea. Here's what they're saying:
[See a collection of political cartoons on the 2012 campaign.]
If you are pro-life, you are anti-woman. The left's premise is that men like Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan who are pro-life are anti-woman. But that doesn't account for the fact that more women are pro-life than pro-choice, according to Gallup. It makes no sense to claim that women who are Catholics, Christian evangelicals, Hispanic, or African-American, for example—many of whom consider themselves pro-life—are all opposed to women's rights. The left also doesn't take into account that the majority of Americans, from both genders, are pro-life. Gallup also reports that for the first time this year, 51 percent of Americans find abortion "morally wrong," with 38 percent finding it "morally acceptable." The number of Americans who identify themselves as "pro-choice" is at a record low, and a majority now call themselves "pro-life," with the biggest change coming among independents. Most Americans are pro-life, and I'd bet very few consider themselves "anti-woman."
Republicans believe that men should control women's bodies. "We shouldn't have a bunch of women a choice of Medicare or private insurance.
I know better than that. Check out just some of the Republican bills targeting women over just the last two years. I have some of them listed on the thread link. Read all of DayStar and my posts on it. Is there a war on women? Yes, there is.

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#76
Nov 1, 2012
 

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a conservative voice wrote:
Republicans want to take contraception away from women. Nobody is arguing that women should be denied access to contraception. The question is whether it should be provided free, should be paid for by taxpayers, and should be mandated for religious employers who find it a violation of their beliefs. It wasn't Republicans who ordered this change; it was the president's administration. Since that decision, polls have shown that the majority of Americans disagree with his stance and believe there should be the sort of religious exemption there has been in the past.
Wrong big-time on all counts. It isn't about taxes. It is about insurance companies covering it. And it 'is not' mandated for religious institutions. There 'is' an exemption for them. But if a paid 'employee' of a church or church-owned business wishes coverage for the pill that individual person on their own at home may request a separate private policy which covers it.

Btw, there is a movement among the Republican party to give states the power to ban birth control pills in their states. Rick Santorum is one. Read our thread in post #1.

As for pregnancy from rape, that's not really a concern for us is it? According to one Republican, Todd Akin, we cannot become pregnant from rape. Btw, what the heck did he mean by 'legitimate rape'? Another Republican leader last month said needing an abortion due to health reasons or risk to life isn't needed because women do not die or have complications during pregnancy or while giving birth. Where do you guys find these nutcases? The problem is when you find them you vote them into office.

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#77
Nov 2, 2012
 
NEW YORK — This election is making me feel oh so special. One party is gallantly protecting me from the other party's "war on women." The president wants my vote so badly that he's trying to scare me with his opponent's plan to return to "the social policy of the 1950s," which I assume means back-alley abortions. Both parties are aggressively courting me in their quest for the women's vote.

"Women's issues." "Women's reproductive rights." How will I ever readjust to being a mere segment of the human race when I have been singled out for so much special treatment?

Easy. I find the Democrats' one-track appeal to women demeaning. What women want isn't that different from what men want: a job that pays well and offers opportunities for advancement; a good education for our children; access to health care; a government that protects our inalienable rights and keeps us safe.

Focusing on our bodies instead of ourselves actually sets the women's movement back to, well, the 1950s, when men went to work and their wives stayed home to cook and clean and raise the kids. In appealing to women on a single issue, albeit an important one, Democrats, in their own way, are doing exactly what they accuse Republicans of doing: waging a war on women — on our brains, not our bodies. They are treating us as if we're too narrow-minded to see beyond abortion. The economy? Leave that to the men. You women focus on the home. It's insulting, if you ask me.

Why all the focus on women? There are more of us. Of the likely voters in the 2012 presidential election, the demographic breakdown is expected to be 52 percent women, 48 percent men, according to a Gallup analysis. In 2008, those shares were 53 percent and 47 percent, respectively.

While both parties are vying for the women's vote in this closely contested election, by far the greater swing in gender preference in the last four years has been among men. Republican candidate Mitt Romney currently leads President Barack Obama by 14 points among males, according to Gallup, compared with a virtual tie between Obama and John McCain in 2008. Among women, Obama led McCain by 14 points and now has an eight-point advantage over Romney. Just maybe the one-trick-pony tack isn't working.

On the campaign trail, Romney doesn't initiate discussions on social issues; he waits to be asked. I suspect that's because he doesn't share his party's opposition to abortion even in cases of rape.

But that isn't the only reason. In 2004, Republicans thought social issues, especially a ban on gay marriage, would help them garner votes, says David Boaz, executive vice president of the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank in Washington.

No longer. Recent polls suggest the public's attitudes have changed. "That sound you don't hear," Boaz says, "is the sound of social change."

The 2012 Republican Party platform calls for constitutional amendments banning same-sex marriage and abortion in all cases. That is a big turn-off to some women, including me. It isn't enough of a reason to vote for Obama.

Besides, the United Statese isn't going back to the social policies of the 1950s under any circumstances, Obama's claims to the contrary notwithstanding. As Boaz notes, the public's views are changing, and social conservatives will have to change if they want to keep their congressional seats.

What about the influence of the tea party, you ask? Remember, the tea party movement started with a February 2009 rant by CNBC's Rick Santelli on the floor of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange against Obama's bailout policies. It had nothing to do with social issues. Its ideology was based on an aversion to big government, favoritism for big business, debt and taxes. Prominent social conservatives, such as Sarah Palin and Michele Bachmann, superimposed their views on the grassroots movement, not the other way around. Some socially conservative Tea Party candidates, such as Delaware's Christine O'Donnell, were defeated in the 2010 election

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#78
Nov 2, 2012
 

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But back to women. If the Democrats really want to demean the fairer sex, at least they could do it with some flair. Let me show them how it's done.

What do women want? Women want to turn on the TV for the president's State of the Union address to find a drop-dead handsome guy who looks as if he just stepped out of the shower (and unfortunately took time to get dressed first).

We want someone who is good with a spatula, who looks like a million bucks in his chef's apron as he flips a stack of jacks and serves breakfast to 124 members of his immediate family.

We want a rich and generous guy, someone who is always first to pick up the tab.

We want a family man, a guy with a lot of expensive homes, and yes, even ones with car elevators.

The only problem for the Democrats is that what women want seems to line up with Republican Mitt Romney.

Source: http://normantranscript.com/community-news-ne...

“One day at a time”

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#79
Nov 2, 2012
 
___Jenny___ wrote:
<quoted text>
Did you know Newt Gingrich, the champion of Republican family values, while he was dissing Clinton in the media for cheating was at the very same time he himself bonking an aide in office supply rooms? His wife busted him and divorced him. That was the second wife who divorced him for cheating. Who did you guys run as a Presidential candidate this year for the very same office Bill Clinton held? Newt Gingrich.
You may want to think about what you post before you post it.
I can assure you of one thing..no Republican President has been impeached by the house for lying to Congress about getting a BJ in the oval office!

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#80
Nov 2, 2012
 
It’s not as though they haven’t tried this before. Whenever Democrats have trouble riling up voters about their agenda – as they are now – they quickly revert to their tried and true playbook. Specifically, page 138:“Drive a wedge between women and men. Women tend to vote liberal; if you can alienate them from men, they vote even more liberal.” It comes right after the rule on page 137:“Use scare tactics about Social Security to get the votes of seniors.”

There’s only one problem: the scare about women isn’t going to work.

The premise of an alleged Republican war on women is faulty as well as sexist: it assumes that women are the mild and weak and require men to pay for their services. The Democrats, including columnists like Sally Kohn, lament the fact that in February 2011,“anti-choice Republicans pushed a rogue measure to cut off all federal funding from Planned Parenthood, even though less than 3% of services provided by Planned Parenthood are abortions, none of which are paid for using federal grant dollars. Still, Republicans saw an opportunity to fire up their fringe base while undermining a liberal-leaning advocacy organization.”

Meanwhile, stealth activist Sandra Fluke famously appeared before Congress to explain why a Catholic institution should pay for her birth control:“In the media lately, some conservative Catholic organizations have been asking what did we expect when we enroll in a Catholic school?&#8232;We can only answer that we expected women to be treated equally, to not have our school create untenable burdens that impede our academic success.”

But all of this assumes that women are incapable of providing their own contraception or pay for their own health care. This is sheer nonsense. Birth control costs $9 per month (and poor Fluke can afford it – she spent time recently in Spain and Italy with her boyfriend). Planned Parenthood is hardly the only health care provider. Independent women are willing for us to hear their roar – as they tell everybody else that they can handle their own bodies, thank you very much. Even so, liberals still contend that Republicans are fighting a war on women while they themselves try to subsidize women to keep them dependent.

Source: http://frontpagemag.com/2012/ben-shapiro/the-...
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#81
Nov 2, 2012
 
___Jenny___ wrote:
If you are a woman voter, or a supporter of equality for everyone, and want to know if there is really a republican party war against American women please go to this Topix thread link. Because there is a war targeting us. It's very real. The thread link has a great deal of information regarding it.
The thread on the link was writen by a friend and me. It's only another Topix thread so it's safe to go to.
http://www.topix.com/forum/columbus/TQB50LH6F...
Women and supporters of equal rights ..... vote against the Republicans in this election. Vote against Romney. Vote Democrat.
Liberals like Obama and Biden think a man should chose another man over a woman for a mate. These queers like woman alright.

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