_____ Republicans Versus Women _____

Since: Sep 09

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#243 May 1, 2013
In Kathryn Bigelow’s movie “Zero Dark Thirty,” Jessica Chastain played Maya, a young CIA operative whose stubborn pursuit of Osama bin Laden played a major role in the al-Qaida leader’s death.

The film garnered both awards (including a Golden Globe for Chastain) and controversy—largely because of graphic scenes depicting the CIA’s use of torture on suspected terrorists. But an undisputed—and to some, surprising—revelation in the film was its disclosure of the key role a female CIA agent played in the search for bin Laden.

Now a new documentary goes further—making clear it wasn’t just one female CIA operative relentlessly searching for bin Laden, as Bigelow’s dramatization suggests, but rather a whole team of women who began sounding the alarm about the al-Qaida leader almost a decade before the 9/11 attacks made bin Laden a household name.

“Manhunt,” which premieres Wednesday on HBO, tries to tell what director Greg Barker describes as “the real story” behind the 20-year hunt for bin Laden. It includes interviews with several members of the so-called Sisterhood, as the team of female analysts assigned to track bin Laden came to be known within the CIA.

Many of those interviewed, including retired agents Nada Bakos, Cindy Storer and Barbara Sude, speak on camera for the first time about their role in the bin Laden pursuit. And all, in some ways, appear to have inspired the female heroine of “Zero Dark Thirty,” from their headstrong efforts to convince colleagues that bin Laden was a serious threat to their fight to be taken seriously by male colleagues amid job pressures that came to dominate their lives.

Storer began tracking bin Laden in the early 1990s—“when al-Qaida was denying its existence even to its friends,” she says in the film. With tears in her eyes, she recalls how she was criticized in a performance review for “spending too much time working on bin Laden.”

“They said we were obsessed crusaders, overly emotional,” Storer recalls. The difference between her and her male colleagues, she says, is “Men throw chairs, women cry.” Still, she admits,“We were borderline obsessed, but I thought it was for a good reason.”

She recalls how she and her colleagues passed around large containers of Tums as they watched increasingly disturbing videos that suspected members of bin Laden’s network posted online—cataloging details in what was becoming a large dossier on al-Qaida.

“It wasn’t the sexiest job,” Bakos said in an interview with Yahoo! News. But she said it was a position that showed how important women are to the CIA. As analysts, she said,“women have patience and perseverance.” She added:“They weren’t looking for the sexy payoff. This wasn't a job people were being promoted to. They were really looking at it as in the defense of our country.”

Only after bin Laden began to be more explicit in his threat to attack the United States was their intelligence taken seriously. But despite clues analysts had that “something big” was coming, they weren’t able to prevent the 9/11 attacks. And the film details the guilt that Storer and her colleagues felt in the aftermath, as they trudged forward in their search.

Bakos, a veteran CIA analyst sent to Iraq at the height of the war to track down al-Qaida leaders there, seems to be a major inspiration for the Maya character in “Zero Dark Thirty”—though she said in an interview she never talked to Bigelow or anyone else associated with the film.

Since: Sep 09

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#244 May 1, 2013
(part two of article)

As part of her duties, Bakos was required to go on raids in search of her target, Abu Musab Zarqawi, then the leader of al-Qaida. It was a role that made her uncomfortable, as she recounts in the film, leading viewers to believe she, like Maya, struggled with seeing the sometimes brutal results of intelligence-gathering in the field.

But the film does not take a moral position on the CIA's interrogation efforts—and Bakos says that’s one reason she decided to speak out about her history as part of the bin Laden hunt. The film, she said, keeps it “politically agnostic and lets the audience decide for themselves” about the CIA’s tactics.

Bakos praised “Zero Dark Thirty” for portraying the “moments of intensity” that came during the CIA’s search for bin Laden and described the film’s depiction of “bureaucratic frustrations” as accurate. But she said Bigelow’s film did not fully communicate the “nuances of intelligence” that she and other analysts on the al-Qaida trail dealt with—and continue to deal with today. And she said it failed to focus on how much of the search was conducted by a "whole team of people" working together under the intense pressure of preventing another terrorist attack.

Asked what she hopes viewers will take away from “Manhunt,” Bakos said she hopes people will gain a better understanding about national security and how the CIA works.

“Intelligence is only as good as the information gathered," Bakos said. "There’s no crystal ball. And there’s no 100 percent.... You cannot, 100 percent of the time, prevent or predict everything that will happen.”
carson

Elizabethtown, IN

#245 May 1, 2013
___Jenny___ wrote:
In Kathryn Bigelow’s movie “Zero Dark Thirty,” Jessica Chastain played Maya, a young CIA operative whose stubborn pursuit of Osama bin Laden played a major role in the al-Qaida leader’s death.
The film garnered both awards (including a Golden Globe for Chastain) and controversy—largely because of graphic scenes depicting the CIA’s use of torture on suspected terrorists. But an undisputed—and to some, surprising—revelation in the film was its disclosure of the key role a female CIA agent played in the search for bin Laden.
She got Bin Laden despite all the roadblocks that the Obama administration threw in front of her. She had to use alot of old intel.

Good movie. I understand why the dems didn't like it.
Betty

Lancing, TN

#247 May 1, 2013
Democrats think so much of women they want to replace a mans wife with a man. Sicko democrats.

“"No Sleep, 'til Brooklyn!"”

Level 1

Since: May 08

Location hidden

#248 May 1, 2013
Seriously, stop trolling. It's annoying.

Level 3

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#249 May 1, 2013
The real truth of the matter is women are the future of the Republican party if they keep up the war on women they are going to have huge problems. This is a case for numbers as it stands now women outnumber men 2-1 now and are more likely to vote. This is something that the Republican party has failed to grasp and I don't understand why. If they keep going to the direction they are headed now well its going to be a party that cease to be. Fact if you think other wise well then you are not living in the real world!

“CO2 is Gaseous Love”

Level 10

Since: Dec 08

Home, sweet home.

#250 May 2, 2013
___Jenny___ wrote:
Ann Coulter? Why not also quote Rush Limbaugh?
Why not?

“CO2 is Gaseous Love”

Level 10

Since: Dec 08

Home, sweet home.

#251 May 2, 2013
People have gender, same sex marriage is bad because it brings a new standard of gender segregation to perfectly integrated and diverse male/female marriage. If you don't want gender apartheid marriage and want to keep integration and diversity; keep marriage one man and one woman the way the Kentucky Constitution and US law declare.

Level 5

Since: Sep 08

Neon City Oh.

#252 May 2, 2013
Saw on another thread, where wingnuts are calling rape, sharing your Christian values.
CTT

London, KY

#253 May 2, 2013
LovehasNogender wrote:
This is a case for numbers as it stands now women outnumber men 2-1 now and are more likely to vote. Fact if you think other wise well then you are not living in the real world!
OK Love, it's going to take some serious proof to make anyone believe there are twice as many women as men. Men do tend to get themselves killed in wars etc at far greater rates than women, but I seriously doubt your numbers.

Level 3

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#254 May 2, 2013
CTT wrote:
<quoted text>
OK Love, it's going to take some serious proof to make anyone believe there are twice as many women as men. Men do tend to get themselves killed in wars etc at far greater rates than women, but I seriously doubt your numbers.
This has more to do with the problem that the Republican party faces with women. Its a fact they keep going away from what it is that the majority of the population agrees with. If the Republican party fails to start some kind of walking in the right direction well they must not want to ever win the Whitehouse again. Its a fact the Republican party likes to find a horse and beat it way past the years it should every really be talked about much like the Anti Abortion way the party has been going for decades.

Since: Sep 09

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#255 May 2, 2013
CTT wrote:
<quoted text>
OK Love, it's going to take some serious proof to make anyone believe there are twice as many women as men. Men do tend to get themselves killed in wars etc at far greater rates than women, but I seriously doubt your numbers.
I think one number is what should be important to any political Party. And that's the number of us (women) who vote.

That important number is 70.4 million. That's the number of us who voted in the presidential election. It's not the number of women who registered, it's the number which went to the polls and cast ballots. That number versus 60.7 million men. There were 9.7 million more women voted than men.

But has the Republican Party learned anything from this number? Nope. Not a single thing. Will they ever? Probably not as long as they continue letting far-rightwing political extremists, religious ultra-extremists, old fogies with sexist beliefs, and corporate hacks have control of their party.

In 2012 a message was sent. There were more women elected to Congress than at any other time in American history. We shattered glass ceilings across the nation. And we're making it clear this is a nation which is ready for women's leadership. If Hillary Clinton were to run in the next presidential election we will have our first woman President. We still may even if it's someone else. That 'Men Only' sign on the oval office door may very well come down.

We, women, are much more pragmatic than men. And we're far more likely to put families ahead of politics and end partisan bickering.

Not many people know this but for the last few years there has been an unofficial committee meeting on a fairly regular basis. It's not even on any schedule and they don't have a name for it. It's made up of only women Congresspeople that are getting together on their own. They are from both the Republican and Democrat Party. They discuss current political events and problems. Guess what? There has been no problems with fighting or working against possible solutions solely for party reasons. If we can do it why can't men Congressmen?
CTT

London, KY

#256 May 2, 2013
___Jenny___ wrote:
<quoted text>
I think one number is what should be important to any political Party. And that's the number of us (women) who vote.
That important number is 70.4 million. That's the number of us who voted in the presidential election. It's not the number of women who registered, it's the number which went to the polls and cast ballots. That number versus 60.7 million men. There were 9.7 million more women voted than men.
But has the Republican Party learned anything from this number? Nope. Not a single thing. Will they ever? Probably not as long as they continue letting far-rightwing political extremists, religious ultra-extremists, old fogies with sexist beliefs, and corporate hacks have control of their party.
In 2012 a message was sent. There were more women elected to Congress than at any other time in American history. We shattered glass ceilings across the nation. And we're making it clear this is a nation which is ready for women's leadership. If Hillary Clinton were to run in the next presidential election we will have our first woman President. We still may even if it's someone else. That 'Men Only' sign on the oval office door may very well come down.
We, women, are much more pragmatic than men. And we're far more likely to put families ahead of politics and end partisan bickering.
Not many people know this but for the last few years there has been an unofficial committee meeting on a fairly regular basis. It's not even on any schedule and they don't have a name for it. It's made up of only women Congresspeople that are getting together on their own. They are from both the Republican and Democrat Party. They discuss current political events and problems. Guess what? There has been no problems with fighting or working against possible solutions solely for party reasons. If we can do it why can't men Congressmen?
Jenny, you're like an eight track tape player, you just play the same songs over and over.

Since: Sep 09

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#257 May 2, 2013
CTT wrote:
<quoted text>
Jenny, you're like an eight track tape player, you just play the same songs over and over.
Ummmmmmmm ..... isn't this thread about women? And how the Republican Party is attempting to put us (women) back to the 1950's?

Since: Sep 09

o------------><-----------o

#258 May 2, 2013
Jeez ..... I just looked it up. There 'are' more of us than men. There are 157.0 million females in America according to the 2010 Census. The number of males is 151.8 million.

Btw, to CTT ..... see ya at the polls in 2016.
CTT

London, KY

#259 May 2, 2013
___Jenny___ wrote:
Jeez ..... I just looked it up. There 'are' more of us than men. There are 157.0 million females in America according to the 2010 Census. The number of males is 151.8 million.
Btw, to CTT ..... see ya at the polls in 2016.


I know you're not saying the number is double though, you're smarter than than. Love's in a world of her own.
a reader

London, KY

#260 May 2, 2013
When you take the amount of women voters and put it with minority voters it wins elections. The GOP has alienated both. Women don't want the old days back. The GOP doesn't understand that.

“"No Sleep, 'til Brooklyn!"”

Level 1

Since: May 08

Location hidden

#261 May 2, 2013
I do agree with you, however, I hope we never have Hillary as a president. I'll vote when I see a viable candidate, which I haven't thus far.
CTT

London, KY

#262 May 2, 2013
a reader wrote:
When you take the amount of women voters and put it with minority voters it wins elections. The GOP has alienated both. Women don't want the old days back. The GOP doesn't understand that.
Sigh, agreed on the latinos, not so much on the women. Not every woman believes the nonsense that republicans are out to get'em.
CTT

London, KY

#263 May 2, 2013
Lisa Marie Merrell wrote:
I do agree with you, however, I hope we never have Hillary as a president. I'll vote when I see a viable candidate, which I haven't thus far.
I'm registered republican but consider myself an independent. I have to admit though that either party is hardly worth the effort, it's usually a matter of choosing the lesser evil.

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