Vinyl Replacement Windows

Vinyl Replacement Windows

There are 6 comments on the Newsday story from Jan 31, 2009, titled Vinyl Replacement Windows. In it, Newsday reports that:

Q. I have an old house that has been sided in vinyl. I want to replace the double-hung wood windows.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Newsday.

James

Topanga, CA

#1 Feb 14, 2009
It's 2009 and most vinyl windows installed average around $500. I do installations in Southern California and prices have increased over the last 9 years. In Southern California vinyl window brands to look for are Simonton, Milgard, Amerimax and Silverline. This list is most expensive to cheapest. Silverline being cheapest doesn't make the window poor quality. The window just doesn't have all the features of the most expensive brands. Simonton, Milgard and Amerimax all have similar features or options like superspacer, vent stops, argon, low-e366. Simonton and Amerimax have more standard features then Milgard like tilt-in single hung, triple weatherstripping and double strength glass standard. Silverline, Milgard, Amerimax and Simonton all come with Lifetime Warranties. Shop around and get a good installer. Installation is half of the solution to energy efficient windows. Most people just look for a good window but installation can make a window work right or become a waste of money for the homeowner.
woodman

Coram, NY

#2 Feb 14, 2009
Wood windows Work Best ! The Green Choice !

Poly-Vinyl Chloride made from crude oil, with massive burning of fossil fuels, and they deteriorate in sunlight but last milleniums in the landfills. Wood is a far better window choice all around.

Wood is a Renewable Resource, It grows in Forests to clean carbon from the air, establish wildlife habitat, has its own waste used to create enegy, no fossil fuels needed, and is biodegradable when no longer needed. No Harm, no foul air ! Plus they insulate better, have a classic natural look, and can be stained, painted or varnished. A proven product !
Shlomo McGillicuddy

Cos Cob, CT

#3 Feb 14, 2009
Any professional opinions or recommendations for triple-paned windows?
woodman

Coram, NY

#4 Feb 14, 2009
Shlomo McGillicuddy wrote:
Any professional opinions or recommendations for triple-paned windows?
Put your money into stopping air infiltration into the home, it robs far more of your heat-AC than the window. Most houses leak like a sieve.
Vinyl Siding lets the wind blow behind it and in through the cracks in the thin 7/16' sheathing. Wood siding like redwood, cypress, cedar, nailed tight to the sheathing with nails into the studs adds insulation, and reduces the air leaks when the wind blows. "Hanging" Poly Vinyl Chloride on the outside stops nothing, especially the money leaving your wallet each year.

See what the experts have to say www.FPL.FS.FED.US your tax money being used to help you. The USDA Forest Products Laboratory.
Shlomo McGillicuddy

Cos Cob, CT

#5 Feb 14, 2009
woodman wrote:
<quoted text>
Put your money into stopping air infiltration into the home, it robs far more of your heat-AC than the window. Most houses leak like a sieve.
Vinyl Siding lets the wind blow behind it and in through the cracks in the thin 7/16' sheathing. Wood siding like redwood, cypress, cedar, nailed tight to the sheathing with nails into the studs adds insulation, and reduces the air leaks when the wind blows. "Hanging" Poly Vinyl Chloride on the outside stops nothing, especially the money leaving your wallet each year.
See what the experts have to say www.FPL.FS.FED.US your tax money being used to help you. The USDA Forest Products Laboratory.
I've got a brick tudor that was built in 1929 and still has the original single-paned doublehung windows with storms on the outside. Is it possible to purchase replacement sashes that have double-paned glass? Also, if such an item is available do they still need to be connnected to sash wesights or are they installed more like your typical replacemnt windows? What I was thinking is that the opening where the sash weights rise and fall must be a huge spacce for air loss and if the sash weights were no lonngger needed with replacemet sashed that I could fill that huge space with nsulation. Thnaks.
woodman

Coram, NY

#6 Feb 14, 2009
Shlomo McGillicuddy wrote:
<quoted text>
I've got a brick tudor that was built in 1929 and still has the original single-paned doublehung windows with storms on the outside. Is it possible to purchase replacement sashes that have double-paned glass? Also, if such an item is available do they still need to be connnected to sash wesights or are they installed more like your typical replacemnt windows? What I was thinking is that the opening where the sash weights rise and fall must be a huge spacce for air loss and if the sash weights were no lonngger needed with replacemet sashed that I could fill that huge space with nsulation. Thnaks.
If your house is that old it may also be 'Balloon Framed'. If so the windows may allow air to escape up into the attic via what is in modern homes, the wall stud cavity filled with insulation. You would be well advised to carefully remove all the large casings (moldings) around one window, and look to see where the air is leaking before you begin the new window replacement. I use expanding foam to fill the spaces above and below the window to stop the air flow that robs you of heat in winter, as well as fill the weights and cords channel once the weights and pulleys have been removed. The companies that make replacement windows can expalin how to measure for the replacement window, and install it. Replacing the window sash with insulating glass and not stopping all those air leaks is like closing the windows and still leaving the doors open. You need to know what insulation there is in the walls, and especially the attic. Brick siding is good at stopping air, but has zero ability to insulate. In 1929 insulation was not commonly used, you need to do a little investigating and get all the fcats before spending any money. Fix the big money things first like no insulation, then move on to the windows, which you could do yourself if you are so inclined. Tradesmen will no like doing such labor intensive jobs, and they'll usually do whatever is easy and quick, as opposed to what is proper and best. Good Luck.

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