Police: Teen's plot to kill parents fails; Friend arrested

Jan 17, 2013 Full story: WHAS11 41

Pulaski County deputies responded to a stabbing Wednesday near Somerset and despite being stabbed, officers say the homeowner overpowered the attacker and held him until police arrived.

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Grey Boxer

London, KY

#1 Jan 22, 2013
Well on the bright side, you know you have a loyal friend if they will come over and kill your parents for you. Im lucky to get my friends to come pick me up from the bar on a good night.

Glad no one died because the police in your town would of had a hard time solving that one. I wonder how long his parents grounded him for that one? I bet he lost his phone privileges and has to walk to all his court dates.
John Masters

Lexington, KY

#2 Jan 22, 2013
That is a good friend indeed... and I wonder if they had a good reason... hum ? PLUS, he's 17 and the son didn't actually do anything here, AND he's a minor... I really wonder if there was a good reason now.
Grey Boxer

London, KY

#4 Jan 22, 2013
Kind of makes you think when you take you child's iPhone away don't it?
John Masters

Lexington, KY

#5 Jan 22, 2013
lol... Yeah, if it's that petty... one guy in Louisville got into a fight w/ his teacher for taking his phone away... and that IS their property. Also schools are oppressive, and teachers dont teach diddly crap... so if the abuse did happen, sexual or physical, then it could be deserved. IDK. I guess we'll find out why he wanted it done, eventually.
Grey Boxer

London, KY

#6 Jan 22, 2013
John Masters wrote:
lol... Yeah, if it's that petty... one guy in Louisville got into a fight w/ his teacher for taking his phone away... and that IS their property. Also schools are oppressive, and teachers dont teach diddly crap... so if the abuse did happen, sexual or physical, then it could be deserved. IDK. I guess we'll find out why he wanted it done, eventually.
Well you know, sometimes you have to think just how much of it is the schools responsibility. I think teachers are important, I think they should get paid more and their job should be of high importance. At the same time tho I think parents should bear the heaviest load, at least starting out and send their children to school with discipline and respect for their teachers. You can't expect a teacher to raise your child for you and I think lazy America expects that.

I'm interested to see how this turns out.
John Masters

Lexington, KY

#7 Jan 22, 2013
I think it's both... or, all three. It's personal responsibility, the family, and the community. All are involved in a person's growth. I wished I was rescued from my abusive home. I wish just if somebody would have just told me that I didnt deserve the abuse, or to stand up for myself... instead, the community all just basked in my subserviance, and willingness to let others make fun of me, just so long as I was being talked about, and got attention, I thought I had friends. But I really didn't, and nobody thought to tell me to stand up, or be proud of myself, or any empowerment whatsoever. It was like the basketball coach and academic team coach, and the teachers, they all wanted me to sit down and shut up, be a passive sheep, and the more I was obedient, and regurgitated their own ideas, which really, all folks like... the sound of their own ideas, back in their own ears... and I was rewarded w/ certificates, and other awards... straight A's... except 1 f-in teacher, who had it out for me. She wanted me to get a B, just so she can say that she permanently wounded me... just to get me to always needing to seek her approval, b/c she hated me... b/c I would fall asleep in her US history class, where'd she teach us lies, on top of lies, on top of lies. And then to have folks who u were entrusted to, totally fail in loving you, and keeping you safe, and making you proud of yourself, and teacbing you that you have to go out in the world and make something of yourself, by yourself... they did the opposite. Just when I started questioning things, folks were so callously dismissive, and trivialized my experiences, that it made it seem as if I was crazy... but I wasn't. I was right on the money. 5,000 assaults on an innocent child, demands 5,000 hits on that abuser... times the person's body weight, over the child's. That's justice. To enslave them. To smash their souls and dignity, for 18 years, or so. That's an eye for an eye. But nobody listened... so when you know something's wrong, but nobody is there to validate your experiences, you may react in a way, that society won't accept. PLUS, he didn't kill nobody. ALSO, he wasn't the trigger man... but we also dont know if the parents did anything in this case... but it seems like they would have, for him to react like this... I hope it's not some spoiled kid b.s....
Grey Boxer

London, KY

#8 Jan 22, 2013
Man I could feel the pain in your post and I really don't know how to respond other than to say I'm sorry. You know the only advice I know how to give is to raise your children better than you were raised. My parents weren't all that and I'm a better parent then they were to me. I wish you the best buddy. Its a long hard journey and when we finally get wise enough we're to old to fix it.
Grey Boxer

London, KY

#9 Jan 23, 2013
I like the fact that you realized your US History class was layered in lies. I take it you agree that changes need to be made? Do you have any opinions on the best way to go about it?
John Masters

Lexington, KY

#10 Jan 23, 2013
I think there's more to it than just raising my children different. My children will definitely be raised differently, but also, just the philosophy on how to interact and treat others is completely different. Paulo Freire justified all my unvalidated yearnings for freedom, like last year, and since then, I haven't felt bad for thinking that I deserved dignity and self-respect. One tactic my abuser like to use was insults and humiliation, as part of a degregation ceremony, not totally unlike Boot Camp. If you turn the people into objects, and make them think they're scum, they'll just stand around and wait for your orders, because they aren't smart enough to make their own decisions. It was painful. It still is. I'm 31 years old. I'm reading as much about it now as I can, because I know that if I don't get over this, then it'll affect every relationship I have. I'd like to have healthy relationships, all around.

My theory with education ties into my theory of life. I think when you can get with a group of folks, who can knock each other's ideas down, and offer different perspectives, that's how we learn. When we dialogue, I offer my perspective, and you offer your perspective, and then there's a new reality that we both need to deal with. I also think having the students participate in their own curriculum is a good idea, and really, just let their own curiosity be their guide. When I want to learn about Kentucky history, the things I learn, I memorize. But when I was required to look upon Gerald Neal as part of some godlike person, meanwhile ignoring my students. Actually, other students seem like they can't wait to knock an independent minded and spirited person down, instead of showing any solidarity, which is why I fear for my country. It's not more obedience we need. It's disobedience. Corraling the children in and out of schools like it's a prison is just getting them ready to become a number in the system, just another worker bee, another tax payer, another wage slave...


So I'm glad you feel my pain, but it was given to show how oppressive those conditions were, and how it's weird how society would rather call you a liar, or deny you, an innocent, defenseless child, of basic human rights, without blinking an eye. It's almost like it's a patriarchal society, and how dare I doubt that "the man" isn't allowed to assault and battery us, on a daily basis.

Solutions:

1 - Bring Democracy into the Classroom. Make the children get along with each other. Instead of using divide and conquer classroom management tactics, create a system, an atmosphere, that we are going to handle any discipline problems that arise. Also, get them to choose their own curriculum... kind of like a Montessori education.

2 - Inspire curiosity. When forced to read rubbish you don't want to read, Kentucky history, or other subjects, hurts. Education shouldn't hurt. It should be liberating.

3 - Dialogue. Encourage the students to stand up and speak up, and let them know that in our capitalistic country, it's sink or swim, and it's up to the individual to command their own futures. If you haven't planned your life out, don't think others have either.

4 - Sugata Mitra and his "Hole in the Wall" experiment shows how education is a self-emergent, self-organizing phenomenon... so if the teacher just put a computer in the middle of the classroom, and said, and did NOTHING, education would happen on it's own. So traditional education is actually anti-education. We need an unschooling movement. School is preventing education from happening, which is remarkable, since education is a self-emergent, self-organizing phenomenon.

5 - Get the students to teach. The Learning Pyramid shows that we retain 5% of lectures, so when Professors, like my Democracy Professor, or Black studies professor at UofL,
John Masters

Lexington, KY

#11 Jan 23, 2013
stands in front of the room, and talks, on and on, and gets mad when you raise your hand... that's not right. When there's not even democracy in a Democratization Class, you know you've got a problem. I'm also sick of not knowing my classmates, since talking to each other somehow compromises the social power of the Teacher.

6 - More real world applications. Einstein said Experience is Education, and that everything else is information. The Learning Pyramid shows that Teaching others has the highest retention rates, just as Doing Education does. The worst way to teach, is to lecture.

There's a few ideas. I've got lots more, but those would serve as a good foundation for teaching something useful. I had a Professor at Spalding University tell me that when my "radical" ideas I shouldn't teach... but I'm wondering, if she's against a Real Education... then perhaps, she's the one who shouldn't be teaching.
John Masters

Lexington, KY

#12 Jan 23, 2013
It also makes me think of these school shootings. They asked Marilyn Manson what he would have said to the Columbine shooters if he had the chance, and he said this:

"I wouldn't have said anything. I would have listened. And that's something nobody did."

I'm actually constituted the opposite. I'm more likely to believe a child, since they haven't learned how to lie yet, and are generally truthful people, and to doubt the adult, who has every reason in the world to doubt.
Old

Beattyville, KY

#13 Jan 23, 2013
John Masters wrote:
[QUOTE who="John Masters"]
Solutions:
1 - Bring Democracy into the Classroom. Make the children get along with each other. Instead of using divide and conquer classroom management tactics, create a system, an atmosphere, that we are going to handle any discipline problems that arise. Also, get them to choose their own curriculum... kind of like a Montessori education.
2 - Inspire curiosity. When forced to read rubbish you don't want to read, Kentucky history, or other subjects, hurts. Education shouldn't hurt. It should be liberating.
3 - Dialogue. Encourage the students to stand up and speak up, and let them know that in our capitalistic country, it's sink or swim, and it's up to the individual to command their own futures. If you haven't planned your life out, don't think others have either.
4 - Sugata Mitra and his "Hole in the Wall" experiment shows how education is a self-emergent, self-organizing phenomenon... so if the teacher just put a computer in the middle of the classroom, and said, and did NOTHING, education would happen on it's own. So traditional education is actually anti-education. We need an unschooling movement. School is preventing education from happening, which is remarkable, since education is a self-emergent, self-organizing phenomenon.
5 - Get the students to teach. The Learning Pyramid shows that we retain 5% of lectures, so when Professors, like my Democracy Professor, or Black studies professor at UofL
6 - More real world applications. Einstein said Experience is Education, and that everything else is information. The Learning Pyramid shows that Teaching others has the highest retention rates, just as Doing Education does. The worst way to teach, is to lecture.
There's a few ideas. I've got lots more, but those would serve as a good foundation for teaching something useful. I had a Professor at Spalding University tell me that when my "radical" ideas I shouldn't teach... but I'm wondering, if she's against a Real Education... then perhaps, she's the one who shouldn't be teaching.
You have fallen into the same trap that your teachers did in assuming that there is a one teaching style that works best for all. There isn't. If you'd actually studied the history of education you'd have noticed the pendulum. People ;earn differently in different environments. Sometimes lecture is better. Sometimes an open forum is better. It depends on the student, the other students, the teacher and the environment. There are too many variables to say that this or that technique is better than another.
Old

Beattyville, KY

#14 Jan 23, 2013
John Masters wrote:
I'm actually constituted the opposite. I'm more likely to believe a child, since they haven't learned how to lie yet, and are generally truthful people, and to doubt the adult, who has every reason in the world to doubt.
The average child learns to lie by the age of 4, about the same time that someone outside the family can understand what they are saying. Analyze everything and everyone, but do it respectfully at least until you have determined that someone is unworthy of any trust at all.
John Masters

Lexington, KY

#15 Jan 23, 2013
I presented 6 different teaching strategies, and I presented evidence that proves retention rates are low for only listening. And if you've ever presented any material, you'd know, that in order to teach, you must really know what you're talking about. http://stephenslighthouse.com/wp-content/uplo...

Retention Rates:

5%- Lecture
10%- Reading
20%- Audio Visual
30%- Demonstration
50%- Discussion
75%- Practice Doing
90%- Teach others

I've quoted Einstein, I've showed my sources, and all I was asked, was to provide alternatives. You crapped on me w/o presenting any alternatives... basically u said, "There's too many variables, so let's all just swallow lectures our whole life." I'm nearly $60,000 in debt, and I want a real education. I want to be learning useful knowledge, or useful experiences, or trades, instead of the worthless dribble I'm being shovel-fed now. I'm 31 years old, working on being a teacher, and I really want to offer my students something. Dont just listen to me b/c I'll punish you if you don't, but because I actually have information you want to hear about, or activities which make learning fun... but so far, I have no got that from my American education.

You're also against democracy? I hate how unthoughtful ur response was. I say, "Think outside the box." U say, "Get back inside." Yeah... thx for ur contribution. Not

Here's those retention rates again. Look at them. Memorize them. They're right. Class is boring for everybody, and Sugata Mitra knows a million times more than ... "Old"... lol.

Retention Rates:

5%- Lecture
10%- Reading
20%- Audio Visual
30%- Demonstration
50%- Discussion
75%- Practice Doing
90%- Teach others
John Masters

Lexington, KY

#16 Jan 23, 2013
Old wrote:
<quoted text>The average child learns to lie by the age of 4, about the same time that someone outside the family can understand what they are saying. Analyze everything and everyone, but do it respectfully at least until you have determined that someone is unworthy of any trust at all.
Do u beat ur kids too ? Oppressors are one step away from being Molesters.

Cognitive Dissonance. It hurts your head to lie. I still would believe a child who says abuse is happening, over an adult who denies it. Could they be lying. Sure. But do we want to chance that? I like the Rule of 3. As long as there's 3 folks in a room, then there's a witness, and that serves as a check. And when a child comes up to me, and says their father is beating them, I believe them. I believe it's pervasive, and all over the place, esp in KY and WV. I have Vermont friends who were absolutely appalled about the things KY and WV consider "acceptable"... b/c it's not. Not by anybody's standards. Fk BF Skinner. I'm no Behaviorialist. That's justifying Hitler's tactics too.
Old

Beattyville, KY

#17 Jan 23, 2013
John Masters,
You aren't worth my time. Take your meds.
Strawman
Moving Goal Posts
Ad Hominem
Take a class in symbolic logic and then get back to us.
Grey Boxer

London, KY

#19 Jan 23, 2013
John Masters wrote:
......Sugata Mitra and his "Hole in the Wall" experiment shows how education is a self-emergent, self-organizing phenomenon...
That experiment inspired the movie Slumdog Millionaire. Enjoyed your post.
John Masters

Lexington, KY

#20 Jan 23, 2013
Thx. I put a lot into it.
John Masters

Lexington, KY

#21 Jan 23, 2013
I also didnt know about Slumdog Millionaire.
Grey Boxer

London, KY

#22 Jan 23, 2013
John Masters wrote:
I also didnt know about Slumdog Millionaire.
I think it inspired a book that inspired the movie. I know the two are connected in some way.

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