Vt. companies say speciality jobs har...

Vt. companies say speciality jobs hard to fill

There are 6 comments on the Brattleboro Reformer story from Jul 26, 2010, titled Vt. companies say speciality jobs hard to fill. In it, Brattleboro Reformer reports that:

A number of Vermont businesses say they're having trouble finding people to fill certain jobs that demand specific sets of skills.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Brattleboro Reformer.

Is this humane treatment

Nashua, NH

#1 Jul 27, 2010
Perhaps this shortsighted policy of the State of Vermont that occurred during the Douglas administration MIGHT be a negative factor for companies trying to attract new talent to Vermont. This policy allows the owners of manufacturing facilities to operate without controlling the temperature inside the facility. While I was in the bank recently, a customer complained of working at FiberMark, a paper mill, in temperatures up to 93 degrees. The employer did not provide cold drinks or rest periods. The Vermont Department of Health does not have authority to stop this practice because this area of workplace environment is covered by the Department of Labor and Industry.
But in a recent article in the Brattleboro Reformer, the Vermont Department of Health issued these warnings to avoid heat stroke, including instructions for pet care. "The Vermont Department of Health suggests going to places with air conditioning, such as libraries, theaters, shopping malls and other community facilities that may offer refuge during the warmest times of the day, between noon and 6 p.m.
Heat cramps and heat exhaustion typically occur when people overexert themselves in a warm, humid place, said Mark Bosma, public information officer for Vermont Emergency Management. Symptoms may include headache, muscle pains, cramps and or nausea, Bosma said. The person may also be experiencing dizziness so it's important to treat the person promptly so the condition doesn't intensify into heat stroke, a life-threatening condition."
Vermont is a state-plan state and creates its own safety guidelines while not adhering to the national OSHA standards. A Letter of Interpretation in 2003 changed the standards for regulating temperatures in the manufacturing workplace allowing owners to eliminate air conditioning, as a cost issue. To relieve the heat build up in the plants, it was recommended that windows be opened to provide ventilation when possible. Owners are required to provide cold drinks and rest periods to employees. Until a worker collapses from heat stress and has to be hospitalized, and a Worker’s Compensation Claim is filed, then the worker(s) can report the incident and make a complaint.
How is it possible in forward thinking Vermont that the Legislature voted twice since 2003 to defeat legislation that would have reversed this policy? This policy places workers’ lives in jeopardy of death from heat stroke while the employer benefits from lowered operating costs. From a purely logistical viewpoint, the worker is not performing to his/her fullest potential while fatigued, and workplace safety is compromised. A lethargic worker is not alert and will cause an accident. The production levels diminish, as one is not able to perform at peak levels. This cannot serve the best interests of the employer, or the State of Vermont that is seeking to attract new business. The cost of operating coolant equipment offsets the possibility of an employee succumbing to heat stroke or death. To subject workers to such environments reveals a base disregard for the lives lost to obtain workplace reform over the past 120 years.
Office environments are regulated and must be maintained to 68 – 74 degrees. Where is the equal treatment for factory workers? Older workers working toward retirement have to worry about possible heat stroke, brain damage or death when they report for their shift. Moreover, plant temperatures in the winter months need only be maintained to 60 degrees. If a worker feels cold, he/she is advised to wear more clothing. In many plants, however, operating machinery while wearing gloves poses a work hazard.
The State of Vermont possesses a population of unique workers and entrepreneurs. It is in the best interest of all concerned to protect the basic human rights of the workers and ensure a safe work environment, an environment that does expose the worker to health risks from heat stroke. Where is the humane treatment of the factory worker?
jway

Tuscumbia, AL

#2 Jul 27, 2010
What world or office have you been in. Blaming Douglas.I have seen it well over a 100 many times while making repairs at Fiber Mark Book Press and GP.in the past 30 yrs.The two jobs mentioned are tit jobs must have been created by obumas stimalus// but who wants to pay high property taxes inflated real estate prices while over 10.000 young VITERS leave a yr. But there is a silver lining the new 167 million dollar train service will bribg more flatlanders commuting daily, creating lots of air conditioned service jobs.
jway

Nashua, NH

#3 Jul 27, 2010
Only civil discourse will be recognized for response.
grizzly

Rochester, VT

#4 Jul 27, 2010
How many times so far has it been pointed out that "speciality" isn't a word?
BS isnt from cows only

Dover, NH

#5 Jul 27, 2010
grizzly wrote:
How many times so far has it been pointed out that "speciality" isn't a word?
The words "saved or created" are real words but impossible to prove, hence employment is on the upswing..........Riiiiiiiight. .........
stanleystanley

Dover, NH

#6 Jul 27, 2010
Is this humane treatment wrote:
Perhaps this shortsighted policy of the State of Vermont that occurred during the Douglas administration MIGHT be a negative factor for companies trying to attract new talent to Vermont. This policy allows the owners of manufacturing facilities to operate without controlling the temperature inside the facility. While I was in the bank recently, a customer complained of working at FiberMark, a paper mill, in temperatures up to 93 degrees.
But in a recent article in the Brattleboro Reformer, the Vermont Department of Health issued these warnings to avoid heat stroke, including instructions for pet care. "The Vermont Department of Health suggests going to places with air conditioning, such as libraries, theaters, shopping malls and other community facilities that may offer refuge during the warmest times of the day, between noon and 6 p.m.
Heat cramps and heat exhaustion typically occur when people overexert themselves in a warm, humid place, said Mark Bosma, public information officer for Vermont Emergency Management. Symptoms may include headache, muscle pains, cramps and or nausea, Bosma said. The person may also be experiencing dizziness so it's important to treat the person promptly so the condition doesn't intensify into heat stroke, a life-threatening condition."
Vermont is a state-plan state and creates its own safety guidelines while not adhering to the national OSHA standards. A Letter of Interpretation in 2003 changed the standards for regulating temperatures in the manufacturing workplace allowing owners to eliminate air conditioning, as a cost issue. To relieve the heat build up in the plants, it was recommended that windows be opened to provide ventilation when possible. Owners are required to provide cold drinks and rest periods to employees. Until a worker collapses from heat stress and has to be hospitalized, and a Worker’s Compensation Claim is filed, then the worker(s) can report the incident and make a complaint.
How is it possible in forward thinking Vermont that the Legislature voted twice since 2003 to defeat legislation that would have reversed this policy? This policy places workers’ lives in jeopardy of death from heat stroke while the employer benefits from lowered operating costs. From a purely logistical viewpoint, the worker is not performing to his/her fullest potential while fatigued, and workplace safety is compromised. A lethargic worker is not alert and will cause an accident. The production levels diminish, as one is not able to perform at peak levels. This cannot serve the best interests of the employer, or the State of Vermont that is seeking to attract new business. The cost of operating coolant equipment offsets the possibility of an employee succumbing to heat stroke or death. To subject workers to such environments reveals a base disregard for the lives lost to obtain workplace reform over the past 120 years.
Office environments are regulated and must be maintained to 68 – 74 degrees. Where is the equal treatment for factory workers? Older workers working toward retirement have to worry about possible heat stroke, brain damage or death when they report for their shift. Moreover, plant temperatures in the winter months need only be maintained to 60 degrees. If a worker feels cold, he/she is advised to wear more clothing. In many plants, however, operating machinery while wearing gloves poses a work hazard.
The State of Vermont possesses a population of unique workers and entrepreneurs. It is in the best interest of all concerned to protect the basic human rights of the workers and ensure a safe work environment, an environment that does expose the worker to health risks from heat stroke. Where is the humane treatment of the factory worker?
Boo hoo it is hot inside. If you don't like it quit. Someone else might appreciate the opportunity to have a good job.

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