Considering relocating to Sedona..wha...
curious mother

Brockton, MA

#21 Sep 25, 2009
my 28 year old son is moving to Sedona this weekend from San Francisco because his employer is relocating his business there. I am a little concerned that there is "no life" for a young, single in Sedona....please tell me I'm wrong!
Kristi

Phoenix, AZ

#22 Oct 14, 2009
carljackson wrote:
<quoted text>
tough to find good paying job. also, a bit isolated 2 hours north of phoenix.
we found a great home down the road in Cornville- new homes called Verde Santa Fe that are affordable and close enough to enjoy Sedona's beauty. There are a lot of retiress here and it's great for that but not for employment as pay is very poor here. There are a lot of poor families in nearby Cottonwood also. Many white out of state people are here and people are friendly. There is a large recover population also here as there are many half way houses. Except for the wind and overzealous traffic ticketing officers we arent disappointed we came here from California. Being from LA I sometimes miss all a big city offers and we are 2 hours from Phoenix. If I had my druthers I would have choses Scottsdale AZ is it is upscale and pretty with the palm trees & sagauro cactuses that dont grow here, as well as all the events a bigger city offers. COme visit & see for yourself as it isnt a bad area at all to retire. In fact I condider it a little hidden slice of heaven!
SedonaFan

New Smyrna Beach, FL

#23 Nov 13, 2009
Sedona, like any place, is what you make it. I've been there many times over the years and a previous poster made a huge issue out of homeless folks in Sedona. Coming from Florida, I can tell you this: live in any state where the weather is warm to hot all year with a mild winter and you will have a large problem with the homeless. Sedona is no different. There are low-wage paying jobs that the affluent that live in Sedona certainly aren't going to do, so who will be there to do those jobs? The "poor" that some keep referring to. If it wasn't for those folks, there would be no housekeepers at the hotels, no waiters, no cooks, etc.

Sedona is beautiful, but I wouldn't recommend it for a single person. It may not be a great place for young families also, however, I have ALWAYS had a great experience with the folks in Sedona. Always super friendly, super helpful, and never a negative experience. If you are intimidated by money and affluence, you could make a lot of assumptions about this beautiful place.

Personally, out of all the places in Arizona to live, I would have to agree with a previous poster that Tucson is the absolute ideal. Sedona would be a drive of several hours away if you want to visit, but Tucson is beautiful, doesn't have the terrible pollution problem that Phoenix and its suburbs have, and it has a great cross section of young to old, singles to families, schools, restaurants, great views, clean air, etc. And it also has some of the artsy feel of Sedona and Santa Fe along with the spas and new age healing stuff if you are up for that. Tucson would be my pick to live with a second home in Sedona for regular visits and vacations!

“insight for me is past tense”

Since: Feb 08

Clarkdale/Phoenix/Sedona

#24 Nov 18, 2009
SedonaFan wrote:
Sedona, like any place, is what you make it. Sedona is beautiful, but I wouldn't recommend it for a single person. It may not be a great place for young families also, however, I have ALWAYS had a great experience with the folks in Sedona. Always super friendly, super helpful, and never a negative experience. If you are intimidated by money and affluence, you could make a lot of assumptions about this beautiful place.
Personally, out of all the places in Arizona to live, I would have to agree with a previous poster that Tucson is the absolute ideal. Sedona would be a drive of several hours away if you want to visit, but Tucson is beautiful, doesn't have the terrible pollution problem that Phoenix and its suburbs have, and it has a great cross section of young to old, singles to families, schools, restaurants, great views, clean air, etc. And it also has some of the artsy feel of Sedona and Santa Fe along with the spas and new age healing stuff if you are up for that. Tucson would be my pick to live with a second home in Sedona for regular visits and vacations!
Tucson,NAU,alike,university settings..OK OK..understood..although,i see the progressiveness here,as well..But,,
Guys,guys..a 28 y/o from san fran..is a perfect fit for Sedona.
if active outdoorsie?...life could be ideal...in Sedona.
yeah..the night life or party eves would be limited..but there's alot of activities for active singles here(really)..
plus..we need all the relaxed persons we can muster since the conserv-stiff-right has a strong presence here.(or at least administratively)
any real good circle of friends ..ya make on your own choice.
i've found many fun folks Here, Have,a large array of EQ..makes for intelligent conversation and found,few uncomfortable moments with people that just cannot lie down their social radar for one moment..just, Too High profile etc.
sure it's here..with SOME grandeur;social hierarchy but thats everywhere..(except- detroit)
also..we're.., wha?...45 minutes from North Phoenix..on,,any friday..less time,than one Larry King episode your in the stew for social "Meetups".
at age 28...i believe He's prepared for the obvious Social exchange.just search the web..there's plenty here.
Move Foward

Orland Park, IL

#25 Nov 19, 2009
So, Sedona needs to reassess who they are targeting for tourism and potential relocation. I mean I love the place, but as a 32 year old male, the hiking and nature are awesome aspects obviously, but the dining and shopping mainly appeals to the 50 and over crowd. I know they are the money spenders, but give the 18-34 crowd more to do, and they will come in masses. Personally, I would move there if there was improvement in this area. I'll still visit a few times a year, but till the scene becomes a bit hipper, I'll wait til later in life. Hike on!
W3slinger

Woodland Hills, CA

#26 Nov 23, 2009
Move Foward wrote:
So, Sedona needs to reassess who they are targeting for tourism and potential relocation. I mean I love the place, but as a 32 year old male, the hiking and nature are awesome aspects obviously, but the dining and shopping mainly appeals to the 50 and over crowd. I know they are the money spenders, but give the 18-34 crowd more to do, and they will come in masses. Personally, I would move there if there was improvement in this area. I'll still visit a few times a year, but till the scene becomes a bit hipper, I'll wait til later in life. Hike on!
Move,
I completely understand where you are coming from.

I have to admit that from my last few years of visiting Sedona, the general impression is of a slower paced existence catering to a more sedate lifestyle. This is exactly the reason I continue to make trips to Sedona.

This being said, I pose a question back: Why would anyone want or need to change Sedona? The point of going to a place you like, is that you like it the way it is, not the way you can evolve it to be. In this thread we have already read that Flagstaff, Tucson, Santa Fe are all accessible in the area, and cater to a much broader choice for lifestyle. I would much rather see the Sedona vibe and atmosphere stay unique rather than have yet another homogenous "destination" where college kids go during spring break.

I look forward to your response :)
Move Foward

Orland Park, IL

#27 Nov 24, 2009
W3, I, personally, can not evolve Sedona, however, every place needs to evolve, lest it become a shanty town. Now, clearly Sedona most likely will not suffer such a fate, but that is because it has been evolving. Some people may dislike the road projects going on now, and I'm not sure I myself care for the round abouts, but it shows a desire to move forward. Now, I want Sedona to remain quaint, don't get me wrong, but throw us younger folks a bone. Some better restaurants would be a start. Maybe fewer kitchy souveneir shops. I just think Sedona is great, so why have to go to Flag or Sante Fe!
W3slinger

Northridge, CA

#28 Nov 26, 2009
Move Foward wrote:
W3, I, personally, can not evolve Sedona, however, every place needs to evolve, lest it become a shanty town. Now, clearly Sedona most likely will not suffer such a fate, but that is because it has been evolving. Some people may dislike the road projects going on now, and I'm not sure I myself care for the round abouts, but it shows a desire to move forward. Now, I want Sedona to remain quaint, don't get me wrong, but throw us younger folks a bone. Some better restaurants would be a start. Maybe fewer kitchy souveneir shops. I just think Sedona is great, so why have to go to Flag or Sante Fe!
Move,

Of course you can't eveolve Sedona yourself :)

Of course Sedona must evolve, but my meaning is that it should not just evolve for the sake of growth (without plan).

In California (been here 55 years) I have lived in 3 distinct cities all of which were absorbed by the Urban Sprawl that comes with development. In all cases, this growth came as a response to a percieved "need" to grow. In Oxnard, the population has doubled in the last 6 years. However, the infrastructure supporting this population is lagging behind ...leaving us with horrible traffic, crowded shopping areas, and a diminished lifestyle. The collective "need" to grow has left us in a new city which has evolved into what we left behind.

I would hope that even the "younger" folks who are thinking of moving to an area such as Sedona realize that there is a trade-off with convenience giving way to a much less cluttered lifestyle. Evolution does not equate to growth, it equates to the kind of maturation that enriches and perpetuates the best of what we like. I would much prefer the occasional outing to CoffeePot restaurant, or Area 51, than eating out every night (yes convenient!) at Taco Bell, McDonald', and Panda Express. I have watched all of the quaint restaurants and businesses here In my howmetown give way to the chain institutions; the large chains can afford to absorb a loss where the entrepreneurial endeavors cannot. As the smaller enterprises fail, they close and leave use with the androgenous convenience, which in my opinion is a horrible loss.

I would like to close with a personal philosophy, that while I like to be "near" the action, I want to live far enough away that I can retreat from the action when desired. Once you have opened the door to those who are less inclined to look out for everyone's best intersts (greedy developers and city planners), it is a downhill run. We each have the ability to choose where we live, it is also up to each of us to make that choice intelligently. We each need to protect those interests by making informed decisions, and consideering the consequences (both good and bad) for our decisions.

The question should not be about the growth itself, but about "what kind of growth".
W3slinger

Northridge, CA

#29 Nov 26, 2009
pardon my typos, I had to re-post the step above *eveolve = evolve
*consideering = considering
buttered bread

Schuylkill Haven, PA

#30 Nov 26, 2009
W3slinger wrote:
<quoted text>
Move,
Of course you can't eveolve Sedona yourself :)
Of course Sedona must evolve, but my meaning is that it should not just evolve for the sake of growth (without plan).
In California (been here 55 years) I have lived in 3 distinct cities all of which were absorbed by the Urban Sprawl that comes with development. In all cases, this growth came as a response to a percieved "need" to grow. In Oxnard, the population has doubled in the last 6 years. However, the infrastructure supporting this population is lagging behind ...leaving us with horrible traffic, crowded shopping areas, and a diminished lifestyle. The collective "need" to grow has left us in a new city which has evolved into what we left behind.
I would hope that even the "younger" folks who are thinking of moving to an area such as Sedona realize that there is a trade-off with convenience giving way to a much less cluttered lifestyle. Evolution does not equate to growth, it equates to the kind of maturation that enriches and perpetuates the best of what we like. I would much prefer the occasional outing to CoffeePot restaurant, or Area 51, than eating out every night (yes convenient!) at Taco Bell, McDonald', and Panda Express. I have watched all of the quaint restaurants and businesses here In my howmetown give way to the chain institutions; the large chains can afford to absorb a loss where the entrepreneurial endeavors cannot. As the smaller enterprises fail, they close and leave use with the androgenous convenience, which in my opinion is a horrible loss.
I would like to close with a personal philosophy, that while I like to be "near" the action, I want to live far enough away that I can retreat from the action when desired. Once you have opened the door to those who are less inclined to look out for everyone's best intersts (greedy developers and city planners), it is a downhill run. We each have the ability to choose where we live, it is also up to each of us to make that choice intelligently. We each need to protect those interests by making informed decisions, and consideering the consequences (both good and bad) for our decisions.
The question should not be about the growth itself, but about "what kind of growth".
I miss the coffee pot... I have been in and out of Sedona for 15 years now and still have many of the same friends that I did back then still living there. I guess I would be more the younger generation, I fell in love with the musicians,artists and poet's. The sense of community is strong in that circle and it is very friendly, I always felt welcome.

My fist month's in Sedona were enchanting, I had a job but chose to live camping in different areas around Sedona...Sleep one place 14 day's then move to another then another...ahhh the good ole days.
You can't do that anymore of course =( seems the wealthy don't like folks living for free. Quite a few of my good friends that camped around with me now own their own houses, they loved it they persevered and were able to find nice houses for good prices.

It's not the same anymore on many levels but there are good folk living there and if thats your scene you will find em and enjoy yourself too.
TheRealPlan

Orangeburg, SC

#31 Nov 27, 2009
Amazingrace wrote:
Presently I reside in NE Tennessee. Always been curious about Sedona. If possible provide me some 'inside information'(other than what I can find on the net) about residing there. Since I am a single woman my main concerns include - crime, demographics, jobs, places of interest, etc. Thanking everyone for their input.
So now Amazing Grace, I guess all that you have read is probably a shock to you, especially if you have only lived in NE TN or the surrounding states even.

Especially the Real Estate prices- OUTRAGEOUS!! No one in my circumstance can even think of trying to move out west anywhere really, land is so "prime" and unaffordable. We own our "home" a double wide outright but it's worth nadda and to find something out in the 4 corners area, NOWAY! I should know a little about both circumstances since I lived in S UT 30 yrs and in SC about 7 miserable years now. I have thought of upgrading to NE Tennesse in fact!! Hope you the best.
Lelle

Parksville, Canada

#32 Nov 28, 2009
Hi, I lived in Sedona for 24 years. Now that's a long time. It is a beautiful place, though very small. The town practically buttons up at night. Crime, not much. You hear more of tourist's cars getting broken into, than much of anything else. It's still a very transitional place for a lot of people. They fall in love with the place, move there. Then find how small it really is and move away again. Also if you have allergies it's the pits, as my friends who have allergies will attest. Work, low wages, not much selection, unless you start your own business, and many of them are sinking. Sp, very definite pros and cons. It's situated far from a commercial airport, so consider this too. Good Luck in your decision.
Lelle

Parksville, Canada

#33 Nov 28, 2009
Midwest Ghost wrote:
Gosh Just Me! That sounds horrible. HUD housing and the homeless hanging out at Starbucks. I sure hope that this isn't true, I just bought a 2nd home there. I knew that there is a huge hippie and new-ager problem but all the rest-jeez.
Seriously-as long as Sedona is home to some of the most expensive real estate in the nation that is the way it is going to stay. I don't think that at 500K per acre there is going to be any low income housing going up any time soon. Luckily this is still a capitalist society and the market will dictate. When the employers run out of unskilled labor you will see low income housing going up. It will probably be in Cottonwood though. As I understand it there is a rumor that Cottonwood is trying to annex some of the land between Sedona and cottonwood along 89A. I am not sure what they plan on doing with this but again I am sure it will not be low income housing.
As far as the trailer park goes though you neglected to mention how many of those living there are illegal aliens.
I think that I would be more inclined to agree with smb's description of the city. I feel very safe there and as a single woman I think you will find living there pleasant. My biggest problem with the place is that they roll up the streets at 9PM and the small town politics seem to be a little amplified. Luckily phoenix and flagstaff are not far away for entertainment.
There seems to be plenty of work available but it is all in the service or hospitality industry. If you are in the medical industry you should have no problem finding a good paying job in either Cottonwood or Flagstaff.
HUGE HIPPIE and NEW AGE ''PROBLEM''...now, that's a problem...yicks.
Howard Green

Sedona, AZ

#34 Dec 1, 2009
Sedona is a great place to live if you love nature and quite. Crime is almost non-existant(I never lock my car or house) and the quality of life is good. On the down side, if you like arts and culture, Sedona is a bit lacking. Moreover, the job market can be tough to break into.

www.redstonetours.com
Move Foward

Orland Park, IL

#35 Dec 10, 2009
People say Sedona has a low crime rate. Is this true, or is it kept under cover? Thoughts?
Mom of two

Lombard, IL

#36 Dec 12, 2009
hymmn,sounds like sedona is a cheaper version of California, which I personally hate.thanks for the info.
me rval-you not

Caledonia, MI

#37 Dec 17, 2009
Have no idea. Never been there.
Ellie

Caledonia, MI

#38 Dec 17, 2009
I think it sounds like a nice town.
W3slinger

Woodland Hills, CA

#39 Dec 21, 2009
Mom of two wrote:
hymmn,sounds like sedona is a cheaper version of California, which I personally hate.thanks for the info.
I am confused on this one. I live in Cali now, been here for over 50 years. We have living environments spanning the spectrum in Calif. There are small towns with laid back lifestyle, and large cities where you have all the variety anyone could possibly want. Most of the locations in Calif will have a higher cost of living.

Sedona is much like some of the smaller towns in Northern Calif yes, but not at all like the urban sprawl that exists in Los Angeles. Furthermore, in the context of this conversation, Sedona is not necessarily cheaper, but more an ideal place to settle based on lifestyle choice.
wishing

Mount Vernon, KY

#40 Dec 22, 2009
I wish I could afford to live in Sedona.It's so beautiful and peaceful.

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