Coffee, tea culture in Santa Fe and b...

Coffee, tea culture in Santa Fe and beyond

There are 18 comments on the The Santa Fe New Mexican story from Mar 31, 2009, titled Coffee, tea culture in Santa Fe and beyond. In it, The Santa Fe New Mexican reports that:

A few weeks ago, at a competition held in Portland, Ore., the Specialty Coffee Association of America crowned the 2009 United States Barista Champion.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Santa Fe New Mexican.

pam

Gulfport, MS

#1 Apr 1, 2009
America runs on Dunkin Donuts!

End of comment.
j d stafford

Albuquerque, NM

#2 Apr 1, 2009
Very well-written and conceived, I'd say.
chatterbox87501

Los Alamos, NM

#3 Apr 1, 2009
My friend brought some Kona coffee beans back from the Islands, I'm not going back to the Starbucks I've been drinking.
Rudy Sandoval

Santa Fe, NM

#4 Apr 1, 2009
There's a reason Starbucks rhymes with "sucks."
Judge Roy Bean

Bloomington, IN

#5 Apr 1, 2009
Juan Valdez has been my "baristo" for 30+ years.
schip666

Albuquerque, NM

#6 Apr 1, 2009
If anyone knows where one can get a real espresso in the greater NM area, please reveal your secret...I'm of the belief that no sugar should be required, after the initial shock at least. Ohori's on Paso in S.Fe almost passed the test but pales in comparison to even the Rome Airport.

Coffee: black as hell, strong as death, sweet as love
Judge Roy Bean

Bloomington, IN

#7 Apr 1, 2009
If you can't float a horseshoe in it, don't bother drinking it...

PC Chavez

“Hee-hee-hee, snort!”

Since: Sep 08

Laguna Beach/Santa Fe

#8 Apr 1, 2009
What happened to The French Pastry shop’s expresso. They were one of the first to serve it in Santa Fe. Back then, it would have passed the horseshoe test. Are there new owners? Did they go down hill? Did they dummy-it-down for Americans?
Juliette

San Jose, CA

#9 Apr 1, 2009
Until restaurants and cafes in this country start paying their workers a TRUE living wage (more like $17 an hour) the public is going to have to tip. In countries where workers are paid adequately tipping is 10% or less, and is truly a tip - not a wage subsidy.
why so wacked on wages

Tijeras, NM

#10 Apr 1, 2009
Baristas generally take home $15/hr with tips. Don't know how that compares now with the 'living wage' law.
I don't subsidize baristas in SF unless I get a genuinely decent cup of coffee. So I don't tip before I get my java unless it is a place I know and trust.
I would love it if baristas would learn that a cappuccino is not an 'extra foamy latte' with overly hot steamed milk.....No, you silly baristas,
a cappuccino should be lightweight in the cup and if it's too hot to hold you made me a bad drink!
pam

Gulfport, MS

#11 Apr 1, 2009
Oh, the sophistication of it all!!!*sigh*

Think of it this way...it is made from a bean from a tree...dried and roasted...then ground and hot water poured over it. Presto...black "stuff".

Ever wonder who came up with THAT?(Gee, guys, let's pick some beans, dry 'em out, grind 'em up, pour lots of hot water over the powder and DRINK it!")

It really isn't a big deal...quit making a cup of strained water through a grouond bean some sort of sophistication...it's a primitive idea at best and 95% of you couldn't tell the difference between Maxwell House and $100 a pound beans!(Especailly after watering the sludge down with milk, sugar, flavored syrups and whipped cream out of a can!)

Just have a cup of coffee from McDonald's, Dunkin', or a machine! Get over yourselves!
Judge Roy Bean

Bloomington, IN

#12 Apr 2, 2009
There is an old school coffee vending machine at one of the buildings here which, I'll be damned, makes the best coffee. For 50 cents, a paper paper cup drops behind the lift up plastic window, whirr, whirr, and there is your steaming cup of awesomeness. I want to buy this machine if they ever choose to get rid of it.
Honestly

Alameda, CA

#13 Apr 3, 2009
pam wrote:
Oh, the sophistication of it all!!!*sigh*
Think of it this way...it is made from a bean from a tree...dried and roasted...then ground and hot water poured over it. Presto...black "stuff".
Ever wonder who came up with THAT?(Gee, guys, let's pick some beans, dry 'em out, grind 'em up, pour lots of hot water over the powder and DRINK it!")
It really isn't a big deal...quit making a cup of strained water through a grouond bean some sort of sophistication...it's a primitive idea at best and 95% of you couldn't tell the difference between Maxwell House and $100 a pound beans!(Especailly after watering the sludge down with milk, sugar, flavored syrups and whipped cream out of a can!)
Just have a cup of coffee from McDonald's, Dunkin', or a machine! Get over yourselves!
I heard that! There is good coffee and there is pouring millions of dollars into the hands of people willing to rip you off for $3 a cup! Get over yourselves is right. You can get great coffee at Costco without having to pay executive salaries!
Honestly

Alameda, CA

#14 Apr 3, 2009
chatterbox87501 wrote:
My friend brought some Kona coffee beans back from the Islands, I'm not going back to the Starbucks I've been drinking.
Don't buy the Starbucks Kona, not that great and way overpriced.
Kona

Santa Fe, NM

#15 Apr 3, 2009
Honestly wrote:
<quoted text>Don't buy the Starbucks Kona, not that great and way overpriced.
is very overated. It has to be blended with something that has more body to even be drinkable.

PC Chavez

“Hee-hee-hee, snort!”

Since: Sep 08

Laguna Beach/Santa Fe

#16 Apr 3, 2009
I always thought Kona coffee was overated too. I like piñon coffee way better.
deborah

Minneapolis, MN

#17 Apr 4, 2009
I've always been a tea-drinker, fascinated with all things tea. Now I've come across this curious coffee-flavored tea http://tinyurl.com/coffeeT and wonder what pure coffee drinkers think of it. Or is there such a thing as tea-flavored coffee?
Zorkon 756

Honolulu, HI

#20 Apr 4, 2009
Chatterbox:

I tend to agree with PC. Kona is a bit over-rated. I have some now which I mixed with Decaf because the decaf had no punch.

The best coffee I've had was in Montego Bay, Jamaica, and elsewhere in that country. It is of a quality that is NOT exported.

Here in Hawaii, a 5th grade of it sells for 55.00. I think you can get it for a lot less at Safeway, and even that lower grade is, in my opinion far better than Kona.

Try it, you'll like it.

Otherwise, try Yuban, common at the grocery stores, but ticklish to get just right. A half teaspoon too much or too little makes a big difference. Get it just right, add a little Hazlenut creamer if you prefer and it beats anything else for a cheap price.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

First Hill Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Review: I Love Kickboxing - Kirkland (Dec '15) Jan 17 Danielle Edvalds 22
Loud Jet Noise over Bellevue/Redmond (Sep '10) Jan 10 Klaus ristau 10
High School Students React to Climate Change Dec 27 sympathyforthedevil8 9
News Pacific Cargo Services sells in bankruptcy auct... (Aug '13) Dec '16 Rob 3
News Seattle Old Spaghetti Factory closing in Decemb... Oct '16 Dawn 1
Saving!!! Discounted gift cards from various st... (Jun '16) Oct '16 zyklon B giftgas 2
Mercer Island Music Emporium (Oct '12) Oct '16 zipperhead 16

First Hill Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

First Hill Mortgages