New Law Requires Disclosure Statement...

New Law Requires Disclosure Statement for Lyme Disease Testing

There are 20 comments on the NBC29 Charlottesville story from Mar 22, 2013, titled New Law Requires Disclosure Statement for Lyme Disease Testing. In it, NBC29 Charlottesville reports that:

A new state law will require doctors and labs to warn patients of the limitations of Lyme disease testing.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at NBC29 Charlottesville.

randomthoughts

Atlanta, GA

#1 Mar 25, 2013
I wonder if there will ever be an @ home test for lime ?

I seen a new one for Hiv , seems complicated turned easy.

Is the "western tilt" or whatever it's called complicated beyond the feasable home test for lyme.
huck

Charlottesville, VA

#2 Mar 25, 2013
randomthoughts wrote:
I wonder if there will ever be an @ home test for lime ?
I seen a new one for Hiv , seems complicated turned easy.
Is the "western tilt" or whatever it's called complicated beyond the feasable home test for lyme.
Haven't you watched Star Trek?
huck

Charlottesville, VA

#3 Mar 25, 2013
What's next, a law regarding a disclaimer that that 64-oz slurpee will may make you fat?
randomthoughts

Atlanta, GA

#4 Mar 25, 2013
huck wrote:
<quoted text>
Haven't you watched Star Trek?
Never in my life , nor anything else sci-fi.
huck

Charlottesville, VA

#5 Mar 25, 2013
randomthoughts wrote:
<quoted text>
Never in my life , nor anything else sci-fi.
the tricorder is in your future
JBM

Alexandria, VA

#6 Mar 25, 2013
huck wrote:
What's next, a law regarding a disclaimer that that 64-oz slurpee will may make you fat?
You've obviously never had misdiagnosed Lyme or have known or loved someone who has. Physicians are negligently diagnosing people using a test that is over 50% inaccurate. How about we just 'keep it secret,' because who needs another law, right? Perhaps if we had transparency and honesty within the medical community, we wouldn't need another law. In the meantime, this one will save lives.
randomthoughts

Atlanta, GA

#7 Mar 25, 2013
huck wrote:
<quoted text>
the tricorder is in your future
STOP IT , you know damn well I will (OCD)have to go see what it is you refrenced.

I cannot grasp sci-fi... video games and reality TV.

Maybe I will someday, I hope not .
randomthoughts

Atlanta, GA

#8 Mar 25, 2013
Yes , I need one.

Holy Batman, Talking about the truth being stranger than fiction.

How in the hell have I made it this far without hearing of Moonblink , Scanadu or even this tech . Negroponte , now I know of him , if I believed in genius; I would loath his.

I even used a spectrometer or color meter when they were the size of a fridge, I have one in my camera Bag now.

Fascinating . Let me at it.

My Achilles “heal”
JBM

Alexandria, VA

#9 Mar 25, 2013
Ah, huck, judging me so harshly. May you never meet an infected tick and have to visit one of those physicians who fought so hard against this bill. Really. Even you do not deserve that.
Jodie Donnelly

Villawood, Australia

#10 Mar 26, 2013
They are still undoing so much of this good by throwing in the myth and talking about false positives as if they are anywhere near as common as false negatives. If false positives exist at all it would be about as likely as you and I winning lotto twice in the same week. This means that for all the good of finally making people aware that Lyme/Borrelia infections usually go unrecognised and are extremely hard to detect and that it should be a clinical diagnoses, which is the truth of it. Then when a sufferer gets through the major barriers of not only so many myths designed to shift the focus off this disease but also the barriers that Borrelia put up against detection and when one gets a confirmation of their debilitating, torturous disease, they are forced backwards again with further denial and myths added to the numerous ones already surrounding this horrendous disease. The perpetrators of these dangerous and deadly myths go down fighting and attempt to make you believe that one has produced antibodies to an infection to which one has not been exposed? It makes no sense, but false negatives fill medical literature. I would like to know who feels that they are so God like, that they can dismiss all of your Borrelia symptoms, often following a bite or bites from known vectors of Borrelia which are usually off birds and decide to announce that your test results confirming all of this are just a coincidence and mean nothing. It is really scary that we have allowed them to programme us for so long and that we would buy yet another illogical and absurd myth. This is one of the top ten most ridiculous myths and is nearly as ridiculous as the one suggesting that Borrelia, which is transported by migrating birds all around the world and then disseminated locally by ground foraging birds, stops just short of one’s continent, country, suburb or street.
A search on Lyme disease/Borrelia and co-infections and sea, migrating and ground foraging birds, tick, mites, lice and fleas. Using key words such as reservoirs, hosts, vectors. Instead of using the key words you have been programmed to look up, such as Deer and hard blood engorged tick, can make us all feel very silly.
huck

Charlottesville, VA

#11 Mar 26, 2013
JBM wrote:
Ah, huck, judging me so harshly. May you never meet an infected tick and have to visit one of those physicians who fought so hard against this bill. Really. Even you do not deserve that.
I don't use topix judging. My mom contracted Lyme disease three decades ago in MA. It took quite a while for doctors to figure out her condition. Now the disease is well known, just google Lyme disease; as everyone given the test should do. Doctors who prescribe it are aware of the test's limitations. I just think legislating medical advice can be a slippery slope.
Ashamed of Virginia

Charlottesville, VA

#12 Mar 26, 2013
The Virginia legislature needs to stop practicing medicine and science. If the legislators wanted to play doctor, they should have gone to med school.

The Virginia legislature voted to force all women to undergo a medically unnecessary trans-vaginal ultrasound so as to intimidate, humiliate, and dissuade them from getting an abortion regardless of it's medical necessity.

Now, Virginia passes a law to dictate to physicians that they must engage in what should be standard practice and private discussions between themselves and their patients.

This law will have the effect of misleading patients toward those physicians who advertise and allege to specialize in diagnosing and treating Lyme disease and other alleged chronic tick-borne infections. Check out the backgrounds of such specialists - check out their medical board charges; look at their litigation history and patient complaints; look at the dubious diagnostic procedures they are using; investigate thoroughly the horrifically dangerous treatment protocols they are experimenting with on their patients which involve much more than mere antibiotics.

This law is not about informing patients and doctors about Lyme disease. The ulterior and subversive intent of this bit of legislation is to shift medical care to alternative medicine practitioners, and allow them to gain insurance coverage for their dubious practices.

Alternative medicine practices have no place in science-based medicine. Unless they can demonstrate that their diagnostic and treatment protocols work through legitimate clinical trials, peer review, and other science, then such practices remain dubious.

This legislation was proposed and passed in lieu of the failed HB 512 of 2010. That bill was known as the "Lyme doctor protection bill". Again, these are subversive bits of legislation being proposed towards an end means of gaining protection to practice medicine for alternative medicine practitioners. These laws are not in the best interest of patients; they are to protect their medical businesses freedom to practice, and not to protect the patients.

Investigate the treatments and diagnostic methods of those who purport to be Lyme disease and tick-borne infection specialists. They use Applied Kinesiology, muscle testing, herbs which have never been scientifically evidenced to have any efficacy. They purport to infuse bioenergy field into water, turning it into medicine.

Many of these dubious practitioners have been indicted by the FBI and several have or are currently serving jail time for serious offenses involving health and medical fraud, accepting kickbacks from home infusion companies, and falsly diagnosing patients with pseudo medical conditions so as to prolong their dubious treatments as an income generating source for their unethical medical practices.

What has come of Virginia? It is home to many military bases and the Pentagon. Virginians should be proud to be home to many of the best experts in science and technology that the United States has to offer. Yet we are passing laws which are founded by subversive attempts to push pseudoscience into the mainstream.
Frank

Charlottesville, VA

#13 Mar 26, 2013
huck wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't use topix judging. My mom contracted Lyme disease three decades ago in MA. It took quite a while for doctors to figure out her condition. Now the disease is well known, just google Lyme disease; as everyone given the test should do. Doctors who prescribe it are aware of the test's limitations. I just think legislating medical advice can be a slippery slope.
The disease is well known but still there are skeptics that the disease is real. If creating a law to force people to stop denying the disease, then so be it. I have too many friends and relatives who have life debilitating illnesses from Lymes. And many of these folks like your Mom had the disease but the drs denied it. One had a spinal tap because the drs didn't get it and inadvertently introduced the spirochete into the brain.
JBM

Alexandria, VA

#14 Mar 26, 2013
It's the 'pseudo-science' of the govt (CDC) that has led to the explosion of misdiagnosing Lyme disease from the ELISA test. A CDC representative sat in the Lyme Disease Task Force meeting and stated that the ELISA is over 50% inaccurate, and yet, the CDC refuses to change guidelines that allow for clinical diagnosis and ELISA testing.

I'm not sure whom you work for, but you sound like a government/pharma employee or medical doctor. No one in their right mind accepts ALL scientific research (particularly govt-based) as gospel truth. It's also interesting how you start out bashing the Virginia legislature, yet you want everyone to get in line behind the federal govt guidelines.
JBM

Alexandria, VA

#15 Mar 26, 2013
My last comment (above) was for Ashamed of Virginia. I'd hate for you to miss my reply.
Ashamed of Virginia

Charlottesville, VA

#16 Mar 26, 2013
JBM, You are confused. The CDC does not set any guidelines for clinical diagnosis or ELISA testing. Doctors are not being sanctioned or investigated for treating any infectious diseases with reasonable amounts of medications or other therapies, including antibiotics.

Provide reputable scientific evidence to support the dubious, unscientific treatments being sold to patients who are being clinically diagnosed with "chronic Lyme disease", and you will gain more support within the medical community. No evidence = no support.

Anyone who questions this issue should carefully investigate the practices of those who purport to diagnose and treat what they have dubbed "chronic Lyme disease".
JBM

Alexandria, VA

#17 Mar 26, 2013
Ashamed of Virginia wrote:
JBM, You are confused. The CDC does not set any guidelines for clinical diagnosis or ELISA testing. Doctors are not being sanctioned or investigated for treating any infectious diseases with reasonable amounts of medications or other therapies, including antibiotics.
Provide reputable scientific evidence to support the dubious, unscientific treatments being sold to patients who are being clinically diagnosed with "chronic Lyme disease", and you will gain more support within the medical community. No evidence = no support.
Anyone who questions this issue should carefully investigate the practices of those who purport to diagnose and treat what they have dubbed "chronic Lyme disease".
I am not mistaken -- I've spoken with CDC reps. And you are speaking of 'chronic Lyme disease,' about which there is controversy. Where there SHOULD BE little controversy is diagnosis at the time of infection. BUT, lo and behold, the CDC says run an ELISA to check for Lyme, and perhaps even a Western Blot, but you must have 5 out of the magical 8 bands to be given a positive Lyme diagnosis -- even if one positive band is the flagella of the Lyme bacteria. Yes, I know there are scant other bacterium that may flag that, but taken into account with other symptoms, the diagnosis SHOULD BE a no-brainer -- but no, it is not, BECAUSE OF CDC GUIDELINES. In addition, the CDC says 28 days of antibiotics -- MAXIMUM. You can have acne and receive years of antibiotics, but ask for 6-8 weeks of antibiotics for Lyme and everyone screams, "Antibiotic resistance!!" I'm not sure what science you want, but anyone interested can google Lyme and research and find out what the CDC chooses to ignore (as well as most doctors these days). I was misdiagnosed (even though I had a rash) from a 'negative' ELISA, and my son was misdiagnosed even though he had SEVEN bulls-eye rashes. Your pseudo-science may tell you one thing about Lyme, but I'd love to introduce you to about 200 of my friends in Loudoun County. Better yet, let's find you one of our deer ticks, let it attach and feed for a few hours, and then, we'll send you to one of our outstanding local docs following those CDC guidelines. THEN, let's talk about Lyme tests, diagnosis and treatment.

Sure, the science may not be settled on "Chronic Lyme Disease," but that's not what this legislation is about. It's to help prevent false negatives at the TIME of INFECTION -- to try to prevent acute Lyme from becoming late-stage disseminated Lyme disease.

You are so busy trying to insult Lyme doctors and those 'crazy' Lyme patients, that you cannot see how much damage people like you inflict. It's because of you that so many of us have late-stage Lyme --- your ranting about *crazy Lyme people* and *alternative treatments* leads to MISDIAGNOSIS at time of infection and a lack of understanding of EFFECTIVE TREATMENT.
Concerned Mom

Charlottesville, VA

#18 Apr 19, 2013
If you think you have a tick borne illness I would advise you to seek medical attention outside of Central Virginia. It is disgraceful that two major medical facilities continue to misdiagnose, or even worse, refuse to diagnose, tick borne illnesses in this area. Lyme disease is only one disease that these ticks carry. Most physicians in this area DO NOT even test for co-infections because 1. they very negligently don't even know some of them exist, and 2.they believe all tick borne illness can be treated with he same antibiotics. NOT TRUE. Ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (or ANY rickettsial infection) require doxycycline REGARDLESS of the patient's age. Babesiosis requires an anti-parasitic medication because antibiotics will not treat babesiosis. Do your own research and educate yourself because you are your family's first line of defense. This year is supposed to be the worst so far for tick borne illness. It should be on everyone's radar at the onset of ANY illness, whether it be physical or mental, yet it is not so many go untreated. This should not be happening in 2013 and it sure should not be happening in Charlottesville, VA. UVA is NOT the expert on tick borne illness by a long shot. Wake up people. Our vetinarians are diagnosing our pets with more accurate testing than humans are offered. Ask your vet. Then ask your vet how they would treat your animal for Lyme. They give double the length of antibiotics. What is wrong with this picture?
Gnu

Charlottesville, VA

#19 Apr 19, 2013
huck wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't use topix judging. My mom contracted Lyme disease three decades ago in MA. It took quite a while for doctors to figure out her condition. Now the disease is well known, just google Lyme disease; as everyone given the test should do. Doctors who prescribe it are aware of the test's limitations. I just think legislating medical advice can be a slippery slope.
Prevention is the key.
40% DEET is a great deterrent. When gardening, hiking, etc., hose down.
JBM

Alexandria, VA

#20 Apr 24, 2013


Take a moment to watch this physician who HAS Lyme disease and his journey to healing -- and see if some of the comments on this page (i.e.; Ashamed in VA) are agenda-driven or just plain misleading and even dangerous.

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