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21 - 40 of 42 Comments Last updated Sep 13, 2013

Since: Jun 12

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#21
Sep 3, 2013
 

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I'll check those out. It was a little disturbing but a book titled "the unit" was an interesting read about organ harvesting from people after they turned 50 in a government mandated program.
just me

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#22
Sep 7, 2013
 
Miss E Font wrote:
I need some new reading material. I just finished
"water for Elephants" it was a good novel and I enjoyed the imagery and the flashback to a traveling train carnival in the early depression years
I also recently read
"Alas, Babylon" it's the SHTF fiction and its like the godfather of all post-apocalyptic novels
"The Warbirds". The Warbirds is the breakthrough novel that captures the saga of the F-4 Phantom and the men who made it a legend

What are you reading or have read that I might check out
Thanks!
If you are a parent, the book called, "parents wanted" is a good book. Def keeps your attention and kinda funny.

Since: Jun 12

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#23
Sep 7, 2013
 
just me wrote:
<quoted text>If you are a parent, the book called, "parents wanted" is a good book. Def keeps your attention and kinda funny.
I'll check it out. I just got the Cuckcoo Calling. It's a murder mystery written by JK Rowlings under a nom du plume
Inexcusable Me

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#24
Sep 7, 2013
 
Take a walk on the wild side and try Shades of Grey....

Since: Jun 12

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#25
Sep 7, 2013
 
Inexcusable Me wrote:
Take a walk on the wild side and try Shades of Grey....
I tried reading it but I was bored. Fifty shades of grey has to lived not read
hmmm

Westmoreland, TN

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#26
Sep 7, 2013
 
Bared to you. Good books. By Sylvia Day . Their a series. Also good self help " Boundaries ".
Mackie

Campbellsville, KY

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#27
Sep 7, 2013
 
Have you read "50 ways to leave your lover" by P. Simon?

Since: Jun 12

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#28
Sep 7, 2013
 
Mackie wrote:
Have you read "50 ways to leave your lover" by P. Simon?
Slip out the back jack?
Inexcusable Me

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#29
Sep 9, 2013
 
Miss E Font wrote:
<quoted text>I tried reading it but I was bored. Fifty shades of grey has to lived not read
Lol... Good one

Since: Jun 12

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#30
Sep 9, 2013
 
Inexcusable Me wrote:
<quoted text>Lol... Good one
People always try to shock me with the details of 50 shades of grey. I was reading the "Story of O" when I was in college, there is nothing new under the sun they say.
trial

Alliance, OH

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#31
Sep 9, 2013
 
Miss E Font wrote:
<quoted text>People always try to shock me with the details of 50 shades of grey. I was reading the "Story of O" when I was in college, there is nothing new under the sun they say.
Have you read the beauty series by Anne rice. She wrote it under the name rolequaire. It was recently listed on a survey as a book people had read but embarrassed to admit lol
Inexcusable Me

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#32
Sep 9, 2013
 
Miss E Font wrote:
<quoted text>People always try to shock me with the details of 50 shades of grey. I was reading the "Story of O" when I was in college, there is nothing new under the sun they say.
I agree, been there, done that!
Marke Twane

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#33
Sep 11, 2013
 
Miss E Font wrote:
I need some new reading material. I just finished
"water for Elephants" it was a good novel and I enjoyed the imagery and the flashback to a traveling train carnival in the early depression years
I also recently read
"Alas, Babylon" it's the SHTF fiction and its like the godfather of all post-apocalyptic novels
"The Warbirds". The Warbirds is the breakthrough novel that captures the saga of the F-4 Phantom and the men who made it a legend
What are you reading or have read that I might check out
Thanks!
I probably would enjoy reading the warbirds. The F-4 Phantom II was relatively new and a really hot plane back in the sixties when I was in the military. It was one of the most versatile fighters ever built. It had a top speed nearly twice the speed of sound. The Marines, Navy, and Air Force all had the F-4 Phantom in a variety of slightly different versions.

I was once at a military airshow. At one point a little HH43B rescue helicopter came chop chopping across the airfield at around 100 knots airspeed or slightly more. An F-4 Phantom was behind the helicopter flying, I'd guess at close to it's stall speed.

About halfway across the field the F-4 pilot nosed up the front of his plane and kicked in the afterburners. The noise level was unbelievable as the F-4 went almost straight up like a rocket. In about a minute he was out of our sight. That was a very impressive sight.

When I was in Vietnam of course they were using Phantom jets and a lot of other modern aircraft, but also a surprising number of older planes from the Korean war or even WWII era.

Old B-26s were made into A-26s (attack aircraft). They were used very effectively against truck traffic coming down the Ho Chi Minh trail.

Another very useful plane was the A-1 Skyraider made by Douglas. It was piston powered. It was originally a Navy - Marine Corps aircraft and had been designated the AD, signifying Attack Douglas.

The A-1 was used a lot for close air support to escort helicopters into hostile fire zones. It could fly low and slow and stay near the helicopters, thus it could stay in the target area with the choppers much better than the faster jets.

The A-1 also had the advantage of being able to haul more than it's own weight in bombs, rockets, napalm, and machine gun ammo. So it was sorta like a flying dump truck. It could just keep on dumping stuff on the bad guys.

They took a few of the old C-47 cargo planes (civilian DC-3)and installed mini guns along one side. They had a guidance system that allowed then to fly in a circle and focus their fire on a area about the size of a football field. Everything in that area was obliterated by bullets from their machine guns. I believe those gunships were nicknamed "Spooky" by the American GIs. Next to the B-52s they were the plane the VC feared the most.

Later, I think they built some gunships using the old C-119 Flying Boxcars and even later they used C-130 cargo planes.

We would get in replacement helicopters, two at a time, hauled in inside the old C-124 Globemaster cargo planes.

The Globemaster was big. It had two passenger decks. The top one could be folded upward and the two halves secured to the planes outer wall.

They had to raise the upper floor like this when hauling our helicopters since they were pretty tall. They put one in head first then another in tail first, with the tail sections overlapping each other, side by side.

Back in those days we were supposedly just "advisors" to the Vietnamese forces. There's very little difference in being an adviser and a combat soldier. Ether way, if you are killed, you are just as dead.

My four month stay in Vietnam in the late summer and early fall of 1963 was rather interesting. I saw a lot of things I'd never seen before, haven't seen since -- and will never see again.
Marke Twane

United States

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#34
Sep 11, 2013
 
Miss E Font wrote:
I need some new reading material. I just finished
"water for Elephants" it was a good novel and I enjoyed the imagery and the flashback to a traveling train carnival in the early depression years
I also recently read
"Alas, Babylon" it's the SHTF fiction and its like the godfather of all post-apocalyptic novels
"The Warbirds". The Warbirds is the breakthrough novel that captures the saga of the F-4 Phantom and the men who made it a legend
What are you reading or have read that I might check out
Thanks!
I probably would enjoy reading the warbirds. The F-4 Phantom II was relatively new and a really hot plane back in the sixties when I was in the military. It was one of the most versatile fighters ever built. It had a top speed nearly twice the speed of sound. The Marines, Navy, and Air Force all had the F-4 Phantom in a variety of slightly different versions.

I was once at a military airshow. At one point a little HH43B rescue helicopter came chop chopping across the airfield at around 100 knots airspeed or slightly more. An F-4 Phantom was behind the helicopter flying, I'd guess at close to it's stall speed.

About halfway across the field the F-4 pilot nosed up the front of his plane and kicked in the afterburners. The noise level was unbelievable as the F-4 went almost straight up like a rocket. In about a minute he was out of our sight. That was a very impressive sight.

When I was in Vietnam of course they were using Phantom jets and a lot of other modern aircraft, but also a surprising number of older planes from the Korean war or even WWII era.

Old B-26s were made into A-26s (attack aircraft). They were used very effectively against truck traffic coming down the Ho Chi Minh trail.

Another very useful plane was the A-1 Skyraider made by Douglas. It was piston powered. It was originally a Navy - Marine Corps aircraft and had been designated the AD, signifying Attack Douglas.

The A-1 was used a lot for close air support to escort helicopters into hostile fire zones. It could fly low and slow and stay near the helicopters, thus it could stay in the target area with the choppers much better than the faster jets.

The A-1 also had the advantage of being able to haul more than it's own weight in bombs, rockets, napalm, and machine gun ammo. So it was sorta like a flying dump truck. It could just keep on dumping stuff on the bad guys.

They took a few of the old C-47 cargo planes (civilian DC-3)and installed mini guns along one side. They had a guidance system that allowed then to fly in a circle and focus their fire on a area about the size of a football field. Everything in that area was obliterated by bullets from their machine guns. I believe those gunships were nicknamed "Spooky" by the American GIs. Next to the B-52s they were the plane the VC feared the most.

Later, I think they built some gunships using the old C-119 Flying Boxcars and even later they used C-130 cargo planes.

We would get in replacement helicopters, two at a time, hauled in inside the old C-124 Globemaster cargo planes.

The Globemaster was big. It had two passenger decks. The top one could be upward and the two halves secured to the planes outer wall.

They had to raise the upper floor like this when hauling our helicopters since they were pretty tall. They put one in head first then another in tail first, with the tail sections overlapping each other, side by side.

Back in those days we were supposedly just "advisors" to the Vietnamese forces. There's very little difference in being an adviser and a combat soldier. Ether way if you are killed you are just as dead.

My four month stay in Vietnam in the late summer and early fall of 1963 was rather interesting. I saw a lot of things I'd never seen before, haven't seen since -- and will never see again.
Marke Twane

United States

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#35
Sep 11, 2013
 
Miss E Font wrote:
I need some new reading material. I just finished
"water for Elephants" it was a good novel and I enjoyed the imagery and the flashback to a traveling train carnival in the early depression years
I also recently read
"Alas, Babylon" it's the SHTF fiction and its like the godfather of all post-apocalyptic novels
"The Warbirds". The Warbirds is the breakthrough novel that captures the saga of the F-4 Phantom and the men who made it a legend
What are you reading or have read that I might check out
Thanks!
I posted this once already but it didn't show up, so if turns up on here twice "it ain't my fault"

I probably would enjoy reading the warbirds. The F-4 Phantom II was relatively new and a really hot plane back in the sixties when I was in the military. It was one of the most versatile fighters ever built. It had a top speed nearly twice the speed of sound. The Marines, Navy, and Air Force all had the F-4 Phantom in a variety of slightly different versions.

I was once at a military airshow. At one point a little HH43B rescue helicopter came chop chopping across the airfield at around 100 knots airspeed or slightly more. An F-4 Phantom was behind the helicopter flying, I'd guess at close to it's stall speed.

About halfway across the field the F-4 pilot nosed up the front of his plane and kicked in the afterburners. The noise level was unbelievable as the F-4 went almost straight up like a rocket. In about a minute he was out of our sight. That was a very impressive sight.

When I was in Vietnam of course they were using Phantom jets and a lot of other modern aircraft, but also a surprising number of older planes from the Korean war or even WWII era.

Old B-26s were made into A-26s (attack aircraft). They were used very effectively against truck traffic coming down the Ho Chi Minh trail.

Another very useful plane was the A-1 Skyraider made by Douglas. It was piston powered. It was originally a Navy - Marine Corps aircraft and had been designated the AD, signifying Attack Douglas.

The A-1 was used a lot for close air support to escort helicopters into hostile fire zones. It could fly low and slow and stay near the helicopters, thus it could stay in the target area with the choppers much better than the faster jets.

The A-1 also had the advantage of being able to haul more than it's own weight in bombs, rockets, napalm, and machine gun ammo. So it was sorta like a flying dump truck. It could just keep on dumping stuff on the bad guys.

They took a few of the old C-47 cargo planes (civilian DC-3)and installed mini guns along one side. They had a guidance system that allowed then to fly in a circle and focus their fire on a area about the size of a football field. Everything in that area was obliterated by bullets from their machine guns. I believe those gunships were nicknamed "Spooky" by the American GIs. Next to the B-52s they were the plane the VC feared the most.

Later, I think they built some gunships using the old C-119 Flying Boxcars and even later they used C-130 cargo planes.

We would get in replacement helicopters, two at a time, hauled in inside the old C-124 Globemaster cargo planes.

The Globemaster was big. It had two passenger decks. The top one could be upward and the two halves secured to the planes outer wall.

They had to raise the upper floor like this when hauling our helicopters since they were pretty tall. They put one in head first then another in tail first, with the tail sections overlapping each other, side by side.

Back in those days we were supposedly just "advisors" to the Vietnamese forces. There's very little difference in being an adviser and a combat soldier. Ether way if you are killed you are just as dead.

My four month stay in Vietnam in the late summer and early fall of 1963 was rather interesting. I saw a lot of things I'd never seen before, haven't seen since -- and will never see again.
Marke Twane

United States

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#36
Sep 11, 2013
 
Miss E Font

I probably would enjoy reading the warbirds. The F-4, Phantom II was relatively new and a really hot plane back in the sixties when I was in the military. It was one of the most versatile fighters ever built. It had a top speed nearly twice the speed of sound. The Marines, Navy, and Air Force all had the F-4 Phantom in a variety of slightly different versions.

I was once at a military airshow. At one point a little HH43B rescue helicopter came chop chopping across the airfield at around 100 knots airspeed or slightly more. An F-4 Phantom was behind the helicopter flying, I'd guess at close to it's stall speed.

About halfway across the field the F-4 pilot nosed up the front of his plane and kicked in the afterburners. The noise level was unbelievable as the F-4 went almost straight up like a rocket. In about a minute he was out of our sight. That was a very impressive sight.

When I was in Vietnam of course they were using Phantom jets and a lot of other modern aircraft, but also a surprising number of older planes from the Korean war or even WWII era.

Old B-26s were made into A-26s (attack aircraft). They were used very effectively against truck traffic coming down the Ho Chi Minh trail.

Another very useful plane was the A-1 Skyraider made by Douglas. It was piston powered. It was originally a Navy - Marine Corps aircraft and had been designated the AD, signifying Attack Douglas.

The A-1 was used a lot for close air support to escort helicopters into hostile fire zones. It could fly low and slow and stay near the helicopters, thus it could stay in the target area with the choppers much better than the faster jets.

The A-1 also had the advantage of being able to haul more than it's own weight in bombs, rockets, napalm, and machine gun ammo. So it was sorta like a flying dump truck. It could just keep on dumping stuff on the bad guys.

They took a few of the old C-47 cargo planes (civilian DC-3)and installed mini guns along one side. They had a guidance system that allowed then to fly in a circle and focus their fire on a area about the size of a football field. Everything in that area was obliterated by bullets from their machine guns. I believe those gunships were nicknamed "Spooky" by the American GIs. Next to the B-52s they were the plane the VC feared the most.

Later, I think they built some gunships using the old C-119 Flying Boxcars and even later they used C-130 cargo planes.

We would get in replacement helicopters, two at a time, hauled in inside the old C-124 Globemaster cargo planes.

The Globemaster was big. It had two passenger decks. The top one could be upward and the two halves secured to the planes outer wall.

They had to raise the upper floor like this when hauling our helicopters since they were pretty tall. They put one in head first then another in tail first, with the tail sections overlapping each other, side by side.

Back in those days we were supposedly just "advisors" to the Vietnamese forces. There's very little difference in being an adviser and a combat soldier. Ether way if you are killed you are just as dead.

My four month stay in Vietnam in the late summer and early fall of 1963 was rather interesting. I saw a lot of things I'd never seen before, haven't seen since -- and will never see again.
Noah Webster

Cameron, WV

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#37
Sep 11, 2013
 
I suggest that you read The Oxford English Dictionary because it has millions of books of all types and genres inside it.

Since: Jun 12

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#38
Sep 11, 2013
 
Marke Twane wrote:
<quoted text>I probably would enjoy reading the warbirds. The F-4 Phantom II was relatively new and a really hot plane back in the sixties when I was in the military. It was one of the most versatile fighters ever built. It had a top speed nearly twice the speed of sound. The Marines, Navy, and Air Force all had the F-4 Phantom in a variety of slightly different versions.

I was once at a military airshow. At one point a little HH43B rescue helicopter came chop chopping across the airfield at around 100 knots airspeed or slightly more. An F-4 Phantom was behind the helicopter flying, I'd guess at close to it's stall speed.

About halfway across the field the F-4 pilot nosed up the front of his plane and kicked in the afterburners. The noise level was unbelievable as the F-4 went almost straight up like a rocket. In about a minute he was out of our sight. That was a very impressive sight.

When I was in Vietnam of course they were using Phantom jets and a lot of other modern aircraft, but also a surprising number of older planes from the Korean war or even WWII era.

Old B-26s were made into A-26s (attack aircraft). They were used very effectively against truck traffic coming down the Ho Chi Minh trail.

Another very useful plane was the A-1 Skyraider made by Douglas. It was piston powered. It was originally a Navy - Marine Corps aircraft and had been designated the AD, signifying Attack Douglas.

The A-1 was used a lot for close air support to escort helicopters into hostile fire zones. It could fly low and slow and stay near the helicopters, thus it could stay in the target area with the choppers much better than the faster jets.

The A-1 also had the advantage of being able to haul more than it's own weight in bombs, rockets, napalm, and machine gun ammo. So it was sorta like a flying dump truck. It could just keep on dumping stuff on the bad guys.

They took a few of the old C-47 cargo planes (civilian DC-3)and installed mini guns along one side. They had a guidance system that allowed then to fly in a circle and focus their fire on a area about the size of a football field. Everything in that area was obliterated by bullets from their machine guns. I believe those gunships were nicknamed "Spooky" by the American GIs. Next to the B-52s they were the plane the VC feared the most.

Later, I think they built some gunships using the old C-119 Flying Boxcars and even later they used C-130 cargo planes.

We would get in replacement helicopters, two at a time, hauled in inside the old C-124 Globemaster cargo planes.

The Globemaster was big. It had two passenger decks. The top one could be upward and the two halves secured to the planes outer wall.

They had to raise the upper floor like this when hauling our helicopters since they were pretty tall. They put one in head first then another in tail first, with the tail sections overlapping each other, side by side.

Back in those days we were supposedly just "advisors" to the Vietnamese forces. There's very little difference in being an adviser and a combat soldier. Ether way if you are killed you are just as dead.

My four month stay in Vietnam in the late summer and early fall of 1963 was rather interesting. I saw a lot of things I'd never seen before, haven't seen since -- and will never see again.
Have you ever been to the military air museum in Ohio?
Agree

Elizabethtown, KY

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#39
Sep 11, 2013
 
I agree with the mo who recommended the Game Of Thrones series. 5 books so far and yes they are long but very good reads, I am not so patiently awaiting the 6th book!:)
Marke Twane

Pelham, TN

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#40
Sep 11, 2013
 
Miss E Font wrote:
<quoted text>
Have you ever been to the military air museum in Ohio?
No I'm sorry to say I haven't.

Also -- apologies for posting that one post multiple times. I'd post it wait around several minutes and it wouldn't show up, so I did it over --more than once. I don't know what was going on.

"Miss E Font", I'd love to visit the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) facility, spreads across 2,600 acre site, with a collection of over 4,200 retired aircraft worth $35 billion.

That's located in Tucson, Arizona, on the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base and is the world's largest military aircraft cemetery.

That would be awesome to see.

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