Lack of rain takes toll on region

Lack of rain takes toll on region

There are 12 comments on the Alamogordo Daily News story from Apr 30, 2011, titled Lack of rain takes toll on region. In it, Alamogordo Daily News reports that:

Today marks the 88th consecutive day without measurable precipitation in the Otero County-Do a Ana County lowlands a situation taking its toll on the JCJ Ranch in Do a Ana.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Alamogordo Daily News.

Since: Oct 08

.

#1 May 1, 2011
It's global warming!
Michael Morris

Carrizozo, NM

#2 May 1, 2011
Well, that's okay. As in the past we will subsidize his business losses.

http://farm.ewg.org/persondetail.php...
Charlie

Alamogordo, NM

#3 May 1, 2011
Michael Morris wrote:
Well, that's okay. As in the past we will subsidize his business losses.
http://farm.ewg.org/persondetail.php...
You get a boner when you post that, don't you?!
Michael Morris

Carrizozo, NM

#4 May 1, 2011
Charlie wrote:
<quoted text>
You get a boner when you post that, don't you?!
nope. I get pretty angry when these guys come in making it sound like they are the ones harmed by this when, in fact, the taxpayers will pick up the lion's share of the cost. It just seems as though a little truth might help even out his self serving statement. You may not understand it, but most small business bears the brunt of changing conditions. We have no government subsidy to keep us going. But under socialism we have come to believe that subsidy and rescue from hard times for these businesses is somehow not only acceptable, but somehow very American.
Charlie

Alamogordo, NM

#5 May 1, 2011
Michael Morris wrote:
<quoted text>
nope. I get pretty angry when these guys come in making it sound like they are the ones harmed by this when, in fact, the taxpayers will pick up the lion's share of the cost. It just seems as though a little truth might help even out his self serving statement. You may not understand it, but most small business bears the brunt of changing conditions. We have no government subsidy to keep us going. But under socialism we have come to believe that subsidy and rescue from hard times for these businesses is somehow not only acceptable, but somehow very American.
I seem to remember your name coming up as an attendee at a Las Vegas, NV IT conference that was funded with stimulus money.
Michael Morris

Carrizozo, NM

#6 May 1, 2011
Charlie wrote:
<quoted text>
I seem to remember your name coming up as an attendee at a Las Vegas, NV IT conference that was funded with stimulus money.
Actually that was one of 2 rulemaking hearings out west regarding the distribution of "stimulus" funds relating to broadband infrastructure. If you read the minutes most of my comments there regarded the fact that Qwest should be cut off from rural broadband funding since they pulled out of the state program aimed at that. My main theme was why was everyone looking to fund the wire carriers when obviously technology is moving towards wireless. I concluded by questioning the basic premise that enough "unserved" areas exist to justify the wild funding being offered.

In the end the rules for the program look a lot like my testimony and it is one of the few "stimulus" programs not immediately depleted of their funds.

By the next hearing in Flagstaff 2 days later the discussions had turned to the real problems facing rural carriers such as refusals of rights of way by federal land management agencies and non-stop rulemaking in the industry.

Here was my comment:

"Mike Morris with Sirius Group. We serve as the technology provider especially for rural areas in southern New Mexico. And there seems to be throughout the panel here an axiomatic belief that somehow the wire line area carriers that are already there are somehow going to be more qualified to run this. In New Mexico two years ago, we had a company [I actually said Qwest, but PC...] demand that our Public Regulation Commission relieve them of a contract they made with the state. So part of that sustainability is going to be how are they going to sustain it because the statements may request money or not, but we do not want anything to do with any further out than we are. We have small providers who are building out. And without looking at that, how are you going to support it locally? There's a possibility possible that you go and support people that are going to run right behind the ones that are already invested in the community by handing out money to companies who may just make a profit off the installations and walk away from it or support it with a call center in India or in Central America which is the case with several of the wire line carriers in it country now."
http://www.ntia.doc.gov/broadbandgrants/09031...

The very last comment of the night.

Now stop the story hour. BTW the only government costs associated with this meeting held in an obscure community theater in a neighborhood on the west of LV was travel and expenses for the 5 or so government employees running the 2 hour meeting.
Charlie

Alamogordo, NM

#7 May 1, 2011
It would be like going to work and making personal phone calls on your bosses dime, right?
Michael Morris

United States

#8 May 1, 2011
Charlie wrote:
It would be like going to work and making personal phone calls on your bosses dime, right?
What would? Me placing my own money where my mouth is to confront corporate welfare and wasteful spending at the obscure meetings where government and big business were dividing up the fruits of the labor of the rest of us? They hear you better when you get right up in their face. In this case the host closed the meeting due to a change in climate. They edited my comments and striped the comment, the reactions of the local businessmen attending as well as as the Qwest executive from the video. That was a great week.

Or did I misunderstand your comment?
SamIAm

Albuquerque, NM

#10 May 1, 2011
So back to the topic on hand...is Alamogordo initiating water restrictions like northern Las Vegas, New Mexico had to? Or is everyone out to get theirs???

My other question is what does this do the neighbors who plant a vegetable garden to survive on? And how about those who have trophy lawns?
Carrot

Alamogordo, NM

#11 May 1, 2011
Didn't put a garden in this year.
Starvin Marvin

Albuquerque, NM

#12 May 1, 2011
There's nothing new about drought conditions in the Chihuahuan desert. But there is arrogance in irrigating landscapes here just like in Phoenix and the Sonoran desert, where aridity is the norm and green lawns,swimming pools and large public fountains are ridiculous. Johns should sell off his herds like all responsible ranchers did during the last drought, and stop whining about how tough he's got it.
old timer

Alamogordo, NM

#13 May 31, 2011
So does anyone have a good link that keeps track of the days since the last rain or measurable precripation, we must be around 109-111 days.

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